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Definitions of reason

  1. present reasons and arguments Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a justification for something existing or happening; "he had no cause to complain"; "they had good reason to rejoice" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion; "We reasoned that it was cheaper to rent than to buy a house" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a rational motive for a belief or action; "the reason that war was declared"; "the grounds for their declaration" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination; "we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the state of having good sense and sound judgment; "his rationality may have been impaired"; "he had to rely less on reason than on rousing their emotions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a fact that logically justifies some premise or conclusion; "there is reason to believe he is lying" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an explanation of the cause of some phenomenon; "the reason a steady state was never reached was that the back pressure built up too slowly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. think logically; "The children must learn to reason" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. A thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; a just ground for a conclusion or an action; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation; the efficient cause of an occurrence or a phenomenon; a motive for an action or a determination; proof, more or less decisive, for an opinion or a conclusion; principle; efficient cause; final cause; ground of argument. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The faculty or capacity of the human mind by which it is distinguished from the intelligence of the inferior animals; the higher as distinguished from the lower cognitive faculties, sense, imagination, and memory, and in contrast to the feelings and desires. Reason comprises conception, judgment, reasoning, and the intuitional faculty. Specifically, it is the intuitional faculty, or the faculty of first truths, as distinguished from the understanding, which is called the discursive or ratiocinative faculty. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Ratio; proportion. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To exercise the rational faculty; to deduce inferences from premises; to perform the process of deduction or of induction; to ratiocinate; to reach conclusions by a systematic comparison of facts. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Hence: To carry on a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to formulate and set forth propositions and the inferences from them; to argue. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To converse; to compare opinions. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss; as, I reasoned the matter with my friend. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To support with reasons, as a request. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To persuade by reasoning or argument; as, to reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons; - with down; as, to reason down a passion. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To find by logical processes; to explain or justify by reason or argument; - usually with out; as, to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The ability to form conclusions and know right from wrong; right judgment; intellect or thinking power; sanity or sane opinions; cause for opinion or act. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. To exercise the power of thinking logically or drawing conclusions; to argue. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. To persuade by argument; to prove or explain by means of the intellect; as, to reason out a solution. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. That which supports or justifies an act, etc.: a motive: proof: excuse: cause: the faculty of the mind by which man draws conclusions, and determines right and truth: the exercise of reason: just view of things: right conduct: propriety: justice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. To exercise the faculty of reason: to deduce inferences from premises: to argue: to debate: (B.) to converse. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. To examine or discuss: to debate: to persuade by reasoning. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. REASONER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Intelligence; faculty of judging; motive; argument; ground; right conduct; justice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. To discuse; persuade by reasoning. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To judge; debate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To prove or influence by reasoning; argue; persuade or dissuade. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. To use the reason; give reasons; argue. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A proof, argument; motive; priciple. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. A cause or condition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Mind; intellect; rational condition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Reasonable conduct or speech. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. The cause, ground, principle or motive of anything said or done; efficient cause; final cause; the faculty of intelligence in man; specially the faculty by which we arrive at necessary truth; the exercise of reason; the premise, specially the minor, of an argument what is according to reason; right; justice; moderation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. To examine or discuss; to persuade by reasoning. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To exercise the faculty of reason; to infer conclusions from premises; to argue; to debate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. That power or faculty in man which eminently distinguishes him from the other animals, and the possession of which enables him to deduce inferences from facts or propositions, and to distinguish good from evil, and truth from falsehood; a thought or a consideration as bearing on a question; cause; ground; motive; that which justifies or supports a determination, or a plan, &c.; final cause; end or object sought; justice; moderation; purpose; design. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. To debate or discuss; to persuade by argument; to deduce inferences justly from premises. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. Due exercise of the reasoning faculty; accordance with, or that which is accordant with and ratified by, the mind rightly exercised; right intellectual judgment; clear and fair deductions from true principles; that which is dictated or supported by the common sense of mankind; right conduct; right; propriety; justice. mso.anu.edu.au
  43. To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons; -- with down; as, to reason down a passion. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. To find by logical processes; to explain or justify by reason or argument; -- usually with out; as, to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon. mso.anu.edu.au
  45. A faculty of the mind by which it distinguishes truth from falsehood, good from evil, and which enables the possessor to deduce inferences from facts or from propositions. Webster. Also an inducement, motive, or ground for action, as in the phrase "reasons for an appeal." See Nelson v. Clongland, 15 Wis. 393; Miller v. Miller, 8 Johns. (N. Y.) 77. REASONABLE 994 REBUTTER thelawdictionary.org
  46. To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons; with down; as, to reason down a passion. dictgcide_fs
  47. To find by logical processes; to explain or justify by reason or argument; usually with out; as, to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon. dictgcide_fs
  48. r[=e]'zn, n. an idea which supports or justifies an act or belief: a motive: proof: excuse: cause: an explanation: the faculty of the mind by which man draws conclusions, and determines right and truth: the exercise of reason: just view of things: right conduct: propriety: justice: that which is conformable to reason: (logic) a premise placed after its conclusion.--v.i. to exercise the faculty of reason: to deduce inferences from premises: to argue: to debate: (B.) to converse.--v.t. to examine or discuss: to debate: to persuade by reasoning.--adj. REA'SONABLE, endowed with reason: rational: acting according to reason: agreeable to reason: just: not excessive: moderate.--n. REA'SONABLENESS.--adv. REA'SONABLY.--ns. REA'SONER; REA'SONING, act of reasoning: that which is offered in argument: course of argument.--adj. REA'SONLESS.--n. REA'SON-PIECE, a wall plate.--BY REASON OF, on account of: in consequence of; PRINCIPLE OF SUFFICIENT REASON, the proposition that nothing happens without a sufficient reason why it should be as it is and not otherwise; PURE REASON, reason absolutely independent of experience. [Fr. raison--L. ratio, rationis--r[=e]ri, ratus, to think.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  49. Same etymon as Ratio. The faculty or property of the mind by means of which man perceives the distinction between right and wrong, in physics as well as in morals. Reason is a just conclusion resulting from the comparison of two ideas, by virtue of which we form a judgment. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  50. (Fact adduced or serving as) argument, motive, cause, or justification (give rr. for; prove with rr.; the woman\'s r., repetition of fact as its own explanation, as in I love him because I love him; for no other reason than that I forgot, but this; there is no r. to suppose; r. of State, political justification esp. for immoral proceeding; the r. of your isolation, of eclipses, is that-; failed by r. of its bad organization; there was r. to believe; I saw r. to suspect him; he complains with r., not unjustifiably); (Log.) one of premisses of syllogism, esp. minor premiss when given after conclusion; the intellectual faculty characteristic esp. of human beings by which conclusions are drawn from premisses (whether dogs have r. is really a question of definition; there can be no opposition between r. & common sense); intellect personified (God& r. are identical); (as transl. of German Vernunft in Kant) faculty transcending the understanding (Verstand) & providing a priori principles, intuition; sanity (has lost his, is restored to, r.); sense, sensible conduct, what is right or practical or practicable, moderation, (without rhyme or r.; bring to r., induce to cease from vain resistance; will do anything in r., within the bounds of moderation; it stands to r., cannot be denied without paradox, would be generally admitted; hear or listen to r., suffer oneself to be persuaded; as r. was, as good sense bade; have r. archaic or transl. of F, be right; there is r. in what you say). Hence reasonless a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. Use argument with person by way of persuasion; form or try to reach conclusions by connected thought silent or expressed (from premisses; about, of, upon, subject), whence reasoner n.; discuss what, whether, why, &c.; conclude, assume as step in argument, say by way of argument, that (or parenth.); express in logical or argumentative form (a reasoned exposition, manifesto, article); persuade by argument out of, into (tried to r. him out of his fears; reasoned himself into perplexity); think out (consequences &c.). Hence reasoning (1) n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  52. a reasoned amendment (parl.), one in which, with a view to directing the course of debate, the reasons for the proposal are embodied. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. n. [French] The gift or exercise of thought; understanding; intelligent;-the faculty which draws inferences from facts and premises, apprehends the relation between causes and effects, and devises means towards ends : - in English philosophy, the cognitive and perceptive faculties; the logical understanding:--in German philosophy, the intuitive or direct apprehension of mental or moral truth; the critical faculty, called pure reason, which judges of the conclusions of the logical understanding:- the cause or ground of an action;- the fundamental idea or principle of doctrinal or other system:- also, the alleged or ostensible cause; consideration: motive :-purpose; object;-ultimate end or design:- that which common sense or general opinion dictates; justice; right : -a proper or reasonable claim; moderation; - a fair or true account of a matter; rationale;-the exercise of the reasoning powers; ratiocination. Cabinet Dictionary

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