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Definitions of tar

  1. cover with tar or asphalt, of roads Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a man who serves as a sailor Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. coat with tar, as of roofs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any of various dark heavy viscid substances obtained as a residue Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. coat with tar; "tar the roof"; "tar the roads" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. A sailor. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. A sailor; a seaman. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A thick, black, viscous liquid obtained by the distillation of wood, coal, etc., and having a varied composition according to the temperature and material employed in obtaining it. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To smear with tar, or as with tar; as, to tar ropes; to tar cloth. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A thick, dark-brown, oily, sticky substance obtained from pine or fir trees, coal, etc.; a sailor or seaman. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To smear with, or as with, tar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. Tarred. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. Tarring. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. A thick, semisolid, blackish brown mass, of complex composition, obtained by the destructive distillation of the wood of various species of pine; pix liquida. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  15. See Pix Liquida. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  16. A thick, dark-colored, viscid product obtained by the destructive distillation of organic substances and bituminous minerals, as wood, coal, peat, shale, etc. Wood-tar, such as the Archangel, Stockholm, and American tars of commerce, is generally prepared by a very rude process. A conical cavity is dug in the ground, with a cast-iron pan at the bottom, from which leads a funnel. Billets of wood (such as pine or fir) are thrown into this cavity, and being covered with turf are slowly burned without flame. The tar which exudes during combustion is conducted off through the funnel. In England wood-tar is chiefly obtained as a by-product in the destructive distillation of wood for the manufacture of wood-vinegar (pyroligneous acid) and wood-spirit (methyl alcohol). It has an acid reaction, and contains various liquid matters of which the principal are methyl-acetate, acetone, hydrocarbons of the benzene series, and a number of oxidized compounds, as carbolic acid. Paraffin, anthracene, naphthalene, chrysene, etc., are found among its solid products. It possesses valuable antiseptic properties, owing to the creasote it contains, and is used extensively for coating and preserving timber and iron in exposed situations, and for impregnating ships’ ropes and cordage. Coal-tar is also extensively obtained in the process of gas manufacture. It is a very valuable substance, in as much as the compounds obtained from it form the starting-points in so many chemical manufactures: a sailor is called a tar from his tarred clothes, hands, etc. "Hearts of oak are our ships, jolly tars are our men."-Sea song. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To smear with tar; as, to tar ropes:-pr.p. tarring; pa.t. and pa.p. tarred. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. Dark, resinous substance obtained from the wood of pine-trees by baking in a kiln; a sailor. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. Tarry. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To smear with tar. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To cover with tar. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. A dark, viscid, oily liquid obtained from resinous woods, coal, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A thick, impure resinous substance, of a dark colour, obtained from pine trees, &c.; a sailor, so-called from his tarred clothes. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To smear with tar. Mineral tar, a soft native bitumen. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. A thick, impure, resinous substance, of a blackish colour, obtained from pine and fir trees, and from common coal; a sailor-so called from his clothes having been often seen bedaubed with tar. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. To smear or daub with tar. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. tär, v.t. to set on, incite to fight. [M. E. tarien, to irritate--A.S. tergan, to provoke.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. tär, n. a viscous, liquid, resinous substance of a dark colour, obtained from pine-trees: a sailor, so called from his tarred clothes.--v.t. to smear with tar:--pr.p. tar'ring; pa.t. and pa.p. tarred.--ns. TAR'HEEL, a North Carolinian; TAR'HOOD, sailors collectively.--TAR AND FEATHER, to smear with tar and then cover with feathers.--BE TARRED WITH THE SAME BRUSH, or STICK, to have the same faults as another; HAVE A TOUCH OF THE TAR-BRUSH, to have an infusion of negro blood in the veins. [A.S. teoro, teru; Dut. teer.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  29. Dark viscid liquid got by dry distillation of wood, coal, &c., & used as preservative of timber& iron, antiseptic, &c.; a touch of the t.-brush, admixture of negro blood as shown by colour of skin; t.-board, stout millboard of tarred rope &c.; t.-water, cold infusion of t. used as medicine, also, tarry ammoniacal water obtained in gas-manufacture. (Vb) cover with t.; t. & feather, smear with tar& then cover with feathers as punishment. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. (Also Jack t.) sailor. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. tarred with the same brush or stick, having the same faults. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. A viscid substance obtained mainly by roasting the wood of various species of pine; another kind is obtained from bituminous coal. American pocket medical dictionary.
  33. A highly complex material produced by the destructive distillation of various organic substances. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  34. Of the U. S. Ph. and Br. Ph., a product obtained by the destructive distillation of the wood of different species of pine. On distillation it yields oil of t. and an acid liquid (impure pyroligneous acid), the residue being pitch. T. yields a small proportion of its constituents, especially pyrocatechin, to water, imparting to it an acid reaction and a peculiar taste. It is readily soluble in alcohol, in ether, and in solutions of the caustic alkalis. In medicinal properties it resembles the turpentines, but is much less irritant. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  35. n. [Anglo-Saxon, Icelandic, German] A thick, impure, resinous substance of a dark colour, obtained from pine and fir-trees by burning the wood with a close, smothering heat or by distillation ; -a similar substance obtained from pit coal ; coal tar ;-a bituminous substance found native in coal seams; mineral tar;-a sailor-so called from his tarred clothes. Cabinet Dictionary

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