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Definitions of tight

  1. (slang) very drunk Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. in an attentive manner; "he remained close on his guard" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (of a contest or contestants) evenly matched; "a close contest"; "a close election"; "a tight game" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. pressed tightly together; "with lips compressed" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. firmly or tightly; "held fast to the rope"; "her foot was stuck fast"; "held tight" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. exasperatingly difficult to handle or circumvent; "a nasty problem"; "a good man to have on your side in a tight situation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. demanding strict attention to rules and procedures; "rigorous discipline"; "tight security"; "stringent safety measures" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. pulled or drawn tight; "taut sails"; "a tight drumhead"; "a tight rope" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. set so close together as to be invulnerable to penetration; "in tight formation"; "a tight blockade" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (economics) affected by scarcity and expensive to borrow; "tight money"; "a tight market" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. packed closely together; "the stood in a tight little group"; "hair in tight curls"; "the pub was packed tight" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. closely constrained or constricted or constricting; "tight skirts"; "he hated tight starched collars"; "fingers closed in a tight fist"; "a tight feeling in his chest" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. securely or solidly fixed in place; rigid; "the bolts are tight" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. affected by scarcity and expensive to borrow; "tight money"; "a tight market" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. very drunk Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. of such close construction as to be impermeable; "a tight roof"; "warm in our tight little house" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. of textiles; "a close weave"; "smooth percale with a very tight weave" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. A quantity having an intermediate value between several others, from which it is derived, and of which it expresses the resultant value; usually, unless otherwise specified, it is the simple average, formed by adding the quantities together and dividing by their number, which is called an arithmetical mean. A geometrical mean is the square root of the product of the quantities. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Somewhat intoxicated; tipsy. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. of Tie Webster Dictionary DB
  21. p. p. of Tie. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Firmly held together; compact; not loose or open; as, tight cloth; a tight knot. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Fitting close, or too close, to the body; as, a tight coat or other garment. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Not ragged; whole; neat; tidy. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Close; parsimonious; saving; as, a man tight in his dealings. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Handy; adroit; brisk. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To tighten. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; - often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Not slack or loose; firmly stretched; taut; - applied to a rope, chain, or the like, extended or stretched out. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Pressing; stringent; not easy; firmly held; dear; - said of money or the money market. Cf. Easy, 7. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Not loose; fastened firmly together; close; closely built; as, a tight barrel; fitting close to the body; as, a tight shoe; not leaky; as, a water-tight ship; taut or stretched; as, a tight rope; scarce, as money. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Closely fitting garments for the lower limbs, worn by actors, acrobats, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. Tightly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Tightness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Close: compact: not leaky: fitting closely: not loose. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Close; compact; firmly drawn; firm; not leaky. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. Not leaky; impervious. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Closely drawn or fastened; stringent. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Fitting closely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Close; compact; not loose or open; net admitting much air; fitting close to the body, as clothes; tense; parsimonious; saving. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. Close-fitting pantaloons. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. Not loose or slack; compact; not leaky; not having holes; sitting very close to the body, as clothes; ill supplied or stringent, as the money-market. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. Close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; -- often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. Not slack or loose; firmly stretched; taut; -- applied to a rope, chain, or the like, extended or stretched out. mso.anu.edu.au
  45. Pressing; stringent; not easy; firmly held; dear; -- said of money or the money market. Cf. Easy, 7. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. Close, so as not to admit the passage of a liquid or other fluid; not leaky; as, a tight ship; a tight cask; a tight room; often used in this sense as the second member of a compound; as, water-tight; air-tight. dictgcide_fs
  47. Not slack or loose; firmly stretched; taut; applied to a rope, chain, or the like, extended or stretched out. dictgcide_fs
  48. Pressing; stringent; not easy; firmly held; dear; said of money or the money market. Cf. Easy, 7. dictgcide_fs
  49. t[=i]t, adj. close: compact: rigid: hampered from want of money: snug, trim: not leaky: fitting closely, also too closely: scarce, not easily obtainable: (coll.) unwilling to part with money: tipsy: not loose or free in treatment.--v.t. TIGHT'EN, to make tight or tighter: to straiten.--v.i. to grow tight or tighter.--n. TIGHT'ENER, one who, or that which, tightens: (anat.) a tensor: (slang) a heavy meal.--adv. TIGHT'LY.--ns. TIGHT'NESS; TIGHT'ROPE, a tightly-stretched rope on which rope-dancers perform.--n.pl. TIGHTS, a garment often of silk, closely fitting the body, or at least the legs, worn by acrobats, dancers, &c. [Scand., Ice. þéitr; cf. Dan. tæt, Dut. digt, Ger. dicht.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  50. t[=i]t (Spens.), pa.t. and pa.p. of tie. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  51. Closely& firmly put together, as t. ship; impermeable, impervious, esp. (in comb.) to specified thing, as air, gas, water, wind, -t.; closely held, drawn, fastened, fitting, &c., as t. knots, cork is too t., corn caused by a (too) t. shoe; neat, trim, compact, as a t. lass, t. little island; tense, stretched so as to leave no slack, as t. rope (esp. one on which rope-dancers &c. perform); (colloq.) drunk; money is t. (not easily obtainable), a t. money-market (in which money is t.); produced by, requiring, great exertion or pressure, as a t. squeeze, am in a t. place (usu. fig., difficult situation); (n. pl.) close-fitting garments as used by acrobat &c.; (adv.) tightly, as squeeze it, hold it, t. Hence tighten v.t. & i., tightener (1, 2), tightness, nn., tightly adv. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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