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Definitions of use

  1. put into service; make work or employ (something) for a particular purpose or for its inherent or natural purpose; "use your head!"; "we only use Spanish at home"; "I can't make use of this tool"; "Apply a magnetic field here"; "This thinking was applied to many projects"; "How do you utilize this tool?"; "I apply this rule to get good results"; "use the plastic bags to store the food"; "He doesn't know how to use a computer" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. avail oneself to; "apply a principle"; "practice a religion"; "use care when going down the stairs"; "use your common sense"; "practice non-violent resistance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (economics) the utilization of economic goods to satisfy needs or in manufacturing; "the consumption of energy has increased steadily" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the act of using; "he warned against the use of narcotic drugs"; "skilled in the utilization of computers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (law) the exercise of the legal right to enjoy the benefits of owning property; "we were given the use of his boat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. what something is used for; "the function of an auger is to bore holes"; "ballet is beautiful but what use is it?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a pattern of behavior acquired through frequent repetition; "she had a habit twirling the ends of her hair"; "long use had hardened him to it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. take or consume (regularly or habitually); "She uses drugs rarely" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. exerting shrewd or devious influence especially for one's own advantage; "his manipulation of his friends was scandalous" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. seek or achieve an end by using to one's advantage; "She uses her influential friends to get jobs"; "The president's wife used her good connections" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a particular service; "he put his knowledge to good use"; "patrons have their uses" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. habitually do something (use only in the past tense); "She used to call her mother every week but now she calls only occasionally"; "I used to get sick when I ate in that dining hall"; "They used to vacation in the Bahamas" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. use up, consume fully; "The legislature expended its time on school questions" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. Custom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. The act of employing anything, or of applying it to one's service; the state of being so employed or applied; application; employment; conversion to some purpose; as, the use of a pen in writing; his machines are in general use. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Occasion or need to employ; necessity; as, to have no further use for a book. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Yielding of service; advantage derived; capability of being used; usefulness; utility. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Continued or repeated practice; customary employment; usage; custom; manner; habit. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Common occurrence; ordinary experience. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The special form of ritual adopted for use in any diocese; as, the Sarum, or Canterbury, use; the Hereford use; the York use; the Roman use; etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The premium paid for the possession and employment of borrowed money; interest; usury. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The benefit or profit of lands and tenements. Use imports a trust and confidence reposed in a man for the holding of lands. He to whose use or benefit the trust is intended shall enjoy the profits. An estate is granted and limited to A for the use of B. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. A stab of iron welded to the side of a forging, as a shaft, near the end, and afterward drawn down, by hammering, so as to lengthen the forging. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To make use of; to convert to one's service; to avail one's self of; to employ; to put a purpose; as, to use a plow; to use a chair; to use time; to use flour for food; to use water for irrigation. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To behave toward; to act with regard to; to treat; as, to use a beast cruelly. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To practice customarily; to make a practice of; as, to use diligence in business. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The benefit or profit of lands and tenements. imports a trust and confidence reposed in a man for the holding of lands. He to whose use or benefit the trust is intended shall enjoy the profits. An estate is granted and limited to A for the use of B. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To accustom; to habituate; to render familiar by practice; to inure; - employed chiefly in the passive participle; as, men used to cold and hunger; soldiers used to hardships and danger. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To be wont or accustomed; to be in the habit or practice; as, he used to ride daily; - now disused in the present tense, perhaps because of the similarity in sound, between use to, and used to. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To be accustomed to go; to frequent; to inhabit; to dwell; - sometimes followed by of. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Serviceableness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. The act of employing something; state of being employed; application of anything to a particular purpose; employment; custom or practice; practical worth; treatment; reason for employing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To employ; to apply to a special purpose; for a time, as property; to treat; to make accustomed: chiefly in the passive voice and followed by to; as, the dog is used to kind treatment. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. To be accustomed: only in past; as, they used to go to the mountains. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Used. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. Using. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To put to some purpose: to avail one's self of: to habituate: to treat or behave toward. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To be accustomed. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  39. Act of using or putting to a purpose: convenience: employment: need: advantage: practice: custom. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. Act of using; employment; need; advantage; practice; custom. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To put to a purpose; employ; avail one's self of; consume; habituate; treat. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To make use of; put into practise; treat; accustom. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. The act of using; application to an end. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. Necessity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. Purpose; employment; application of anything to a purpose, good or bad; utility; occasion to employ; continued practice; premium paid for borrowed money; the benefit or profit of lands and tenements. In use, in employment; in customary practice or observance. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  46. To make use of or employ; to waste or exhaust by employment; to accustom; to habituate; to treat; to practise systematically. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. To be accustomed to; to practise customarily; to be wont; to frequent; to inhabit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. State of being employed to any purpose; occasion or need to employ; the quality which makes a thing proper for a purpose; benefit; advantage; habit; in law, profit; benefit. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  49. To employ; to apply or handle for some purpose; to consume to accustom; to render familiar by practice; to be accustomed; to be wont. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. 1. The right you have to enjoy your property. 2. To make use of or to employ something. thelawdictionary.org
  51. To accustom; to habituate; to render familiar by practice; to inure; -- employed chiefly in the passive participle; as, men used to cold and hunger; soldiers used to hardships and danger. mso.anu.edu.au
  52. To be wont or accustomed; to be in the habit or practice; as, he used to ride daily; -- now disused in the present tense, perhaps because of the similarity in sound, between "use to," and "used to." mso.anu.edu.au
  53. To be accustomed to go; to frequent; to inhabit; to dwell; -- sometimes followed by of. mso.anu.edu.au
  54. To accustom; to habituate; to render familiar by practice; to inure; employed chiefly in the passive participle; as, men used to cold and hunger; soldiers used to hardships and danger. dictgcide_fs
  55. To be wont or accustomed; to be in the habit or practice; as, he used to ride daily; now disused in the present tense, perhaps because of the similarity in sound, between use to,used to. dictgcide_fs
  56. To be accustomed to go; to frequent; to inhabit; to dwell; sometimes followed by of. dictgcide_fs
  57. [=u]z, v.t. to put to some purpose: to avail one's self of: to habituate: to treat or behave toward.--v.i. to be accustomed.--adj. U'SABLE, that may be used.--ns. U'SABLENESS; U'SEE, one for whose use a suit is brought in another's name; U'SER.--USE ONE'S SELF (Shak.), to behave; USE UP, to consume, to exhaust, to tire out. [Fr. user--L. uti, usus, to use.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. [=u]s, n. act of using or putting to a purpose: convenience: employment: need: advantage: practice: common occurrence: a distinctive form of public worship or service peculiar to a church, diocese, &c.: custom: interest for money.--n. US'ANCE (obs.), use, usage, employment: (Shak.) usury, interest for money: the time allowed by usage for the payment of a bill of exchange.--adj. USE'FUL, full of use or advantage: able to do good: serviceable.--adv. USE'FULLY.--n. USE'FULNESS.--adj. USE'LESS, having no use: answering no good purpose or the end proposed.--adv. USE'LESSLY.--n. USE'LESSNESS.--n.pl. US'ES, a form of equitable ownership peculiar to English law by which one person enjoys the profits of lands, &c., the legal title to which is vested in another in trust.--USE AND WONT, the customary practice.--HAVE NO USE FOR (U.S.), to have no liking for; IN USE, in employment or practice; MADE USE OF, to use, to employ; OF NO USE, useless; OF USE, useful; OUT OF USE, not used or employed. [L. usus--uti.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  59. Using, employment, application to a purpose, as should recommend the u. of a file, taught him the u. of the globes, put it to a good u., is meant for u. not ornament, is in daily u., becomes easier with u., worn& polished with u., made u. of (employed) a quibble, pray make u. of my telephone; right or power of using, as stipulated for the u. of the piano, lost the u. of his left arm; availability, utility, purpose for which thing can be used, as a blunt knife is of u. for this work, a foot-rule will be found of (great) u., it is (of) no u. talking or to talk, what is the u. of talking?, talking is no u., find a u. for banana-skins, I have no u. for it; custom, want, familiarity, as long u. has reconciled me to it, in such matters u. is everything, according to his u. in emergencies, u. & wont; ritual& liturgy of a church, diocese, &c., as Sarum, Anglican, Roman, u.; (Law) benefit or profit of lands& tenements in the possession of another who holds them solely for the beneficiary. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Employ for a purpose, handle as instrument, consume as material, exercise, put into operation, avail oneself of, as seldom u. a knife, should u. oil for frying, we seem to u. a great deal of butter, never u. a dictionary, learn to u. your hands, u. your wits, must u. the services of an agent, shall u. every means, must u. your opportunities, u. your discretion, should at least u. some moderation, may I u. your name (quote you as authority, reference, &c.).?, do not fail to u. (in argument, pleading, &c.) this damaging fact, has used my absence to poison everyone against me; treat in specified manner, as has used me like a dog, how did he u. you?, used me ill, illused me; (now only in past, usu. pron. ust, esp. when followed immediately by to) be accustomed, have as one\'s constant or frequent practice, as I used to take the bus, does not come as often as he used (to), bell used always to ring at one, what used he to say?, used not (colloq. didn\'t u.) to answer; (now only in p.p., pron. as last sense) accustomed, as am not used to this sort of thing, to being called a liar, have become used to a vegetarian diet; u. up, consume the whole of (material &c.). find a use for (remaining material &c.), exhaust, wear out e.g. with overwork. Hence usable a., user n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  61. [L.] (Eccl.) The mode of performing the divine offices in churches, and more especially of celebrating the Eucharist. These Uses varied at different times and in different dioceses. The most important English Use was that of Sarum, instituted by Osmund, bishop of that see in 1078. This Use was generally adopted in England, Wales, and Ireland ; and the Bishop of Salisbury thus received the title of precentor of the college of bishops. There were also the Uses of York, Bangor, Hereford, and Lincoln ; but their differences were slight, being confined in some cases to musical notation. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  62. in Law, is a word, whose history must be studied in law-books, and cannot be given concisely. Originally it was simply = the benefit or beneficial enjoyment of land ; an ecclesiastical invention, as is generally believed ; out of which arose many advantages, immunities, abuses. Eventually it became = seisin or legal estate. Charitable uses are enumerated in Statute 43 Elizabeth, and these now, in accordance with its spirit, include all gifts in aid of religion, of education, of the poor, of the young who need help in life, of public utility or order or improvement, etc. ; so long as the Use be not Superstitious, e.g. Masses for the dead. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  63. n. [Latin] Act of employing any thing or of applying it in any manner or for any purpose, but especially for a profitable purpose; handlings practical exercise; application; employment occasion or need to employ; necessity; —advantage derived; usefulness; utility;—continued or repeated practice; customary employment; usage; custom;- the benefit or profit of lands and tenements. Cabinet Dictionary

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