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Definitions of exercise

  1. carry out or practice; as of jobs and professions; "practice law" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. systematic training by multiple repetitions; "practice makes perfect" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the act of using; "he warned against the use of narcotic drugs"; "skilled in the utilization of computers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a task performed or problem solved in order to develop skill or understanding; "you must work the examples at the end of each chapter in the textbook" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the activity of exerting your muscles in various ways to keep fit; "the doctor recommended regular exercise"; "he did some exercising"; "the physical exertion required by his work kept him fit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (usually plural) a ceremony that involves processions and speeches; "academic exercises" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. do physical exercise; "She works out in the gym every day" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. give a work-out to; "Some parents exercise their infants"; "My personal trainer works me hard"; "work one's muscles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. put to use; "exert one's power or influence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. learn by repetition; "We drilled French verbs every day"; "Pianists practice scales" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. The act or exercise of training soldiers in the military art, as in the manual of arms, in the execution of evolutions, and the like; hence, diligent and strict instruction and exercise in the rudiments and methods of any business; a kind or method of military exercises; as, infantry drill; battalion drill; artillery drill. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The act of exercising; a setting in action or practicing; employment in the proper mode of activity; exertion; application; use; habitual activity; occupation, in general; practice. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Exertion for the sake of training or improvement whether physical, intellectual, or moral; practice to acquire skill, knowledge, virtue, perfectness, grace, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Bodily exertion for the sake of keeping the organs and functions in a healthy state; hygienic activity; as, to take exercise on horseback. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The performance of an office, a ceremony, or a religious duty. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. That which is done for the sake of exercising, practicing, training, or promoting skill, health, mental, improvement, moral discipline, etc.; that which is assigned or prescribed for such ends; hence, a disquisition; a lesson; a task; as, military or naval exercises; musical exercises; an exercise in composition. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That which gives practice; a trial; a test. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To set in action; to cause to act, move, or make exertion; to give employment to; to put in action habitually or constantly; to school or train; to exert repeatedly; to busy. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To exert for the sake of training or improvement; to practice in order to develop; hence, also, to improve by practice; to discipline, and to use or to for the purpose of training; as, to exercise arms; to exercise one's self in music; to exercise troops. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To occupy the attention and effort of; to task; to tax, especially in a painful or vexatious manner; harass; to vex; to worry or make anxious; to affect; to discipline; as, exercised with pain. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To put in practice; to carry out in action; to perform the duties of; to use; to employ; to practice; as, to exercise authority; to exercise an office. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To exercise one's self, as under military training; to drill; to take exercise; to use action or exertion; to practice gymnastics; as, to exercise for health or amusement. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure. Medical Dictionary DB
  24. To train by use; exert; practice; employ actively; make anxious. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. To undergo training. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Bodily exertion; activity; labor; practice; a lesson or example for practice; the ceremony ending a course in school. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. A putting in practice: exertion of the body for health or amusement: discipline: a lesson or task. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To train by use: to improve by practice: to afflict: to put in practice: to use. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To take exercise. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To use; practice; train by practice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. use; practice; exertion; discipline; a lesson. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To exert; train by practise. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. To make anxious. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Activity; practise; training. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A putting in use or practice; exertion of the body for health, strength, or dexterity; performance; discipline; drill; a task appointed one to perform; act of divine worship; a lesson for practice; any composition calculated to improve the voice or fingers of the young practitioner. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To exert; to cause to act in any manner; to use; to use for improvement in skill; to perform the duties of; to discipline; to task; to employ; to busy; to afflict; to give anxiety to. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. To use action or exertion. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. Any labour or exertion of the body to promote health or for amusement; any exertion, as in a profession, business, or employment; practice; application of the mind; a lesson or example for practice. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  39. To exert; to cause to act in any manner; to train by use; to discipline; to use exertion for amusement, health, or proficiency; to keep employed. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  40. eks'[.e]r-s[=i]z, n. a putting in practice: exertion of the body for health or amusement: discipline: a lesson, task, academical disputation, &c.: (Shak.) skill: (pl.) military drill: an act of worship or devotion: a discourse, the discussion of a passage of Scripture, giving the coherence of text and context, &c.--the addition, giving the doctrinal propositions, &c.: the Presbytery itself.--v.t. to train by use: to improve by practice: to afflict: to put in practice: to use: to wield.--adj. EX'ERCISABLE. [O. Fr. exercice--L. exercitium--L. exerc[=e]re, -citum--ex, out, arc[=e]re, to shut up.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. Every motion of the body arising from the contraction of muscles subjected to the will. Also, the action of any organ whatever. Exercise may be active or passive. The passive are referred to, under the bead of Gestation. The chief active exercises are- walking, running, dancing, hunting, fencing, playing at ball, cricket, racket, quoits, swimming, declamation, and sing­ing. Exercise is an important prophylactic, particularly for those disposed to be plethoric. It improves the digestion; augments the secretions; and, when used in moderation, gives strength to the body; but when carried to excess, produces debility and disease. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  42. Employment (of organ, faculty, power, right); practice (of virtues, profession, functions, religious rites); exertion of muscles, limbs, &c., esp. for health\'s sake; bodily, mental, or spiritual training; task set for this purpose; (pl.) military drill, athletics, &c.; academical declamation &c. required for degree; composition set to pupils; act of worship. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. Employ (faculty, right, &c.); train (person &c.); tax the powers of; perplex, worry; discharge (functions); take exercise. Hence exercisable a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. The voluntary use of any power or faculty; as commonly used, systematic muscular exertion for the benefit of the health. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  45. n. [Latin] Act of exercising; labour; work; activity;—continued exertion; employment; application; use;—habitual exertion; performance; practice;—bodily exertion for the sake of health;—trial; training; discipline;—mental application; task; lesson;—discharge of official trust or duty; employment of official power;—public or private act of divine worship. Cabinet Dictionary
  46. Labour of the body for health or amusement; preparatory practice in order to skill; practice, outward performance; task, that which one is appointed to perform; act of divine worship, whether publick or private. Complete Dictionary
  47. To employ; to train by use to any act; to talk, to keep employed as a penal injunction; to practise or use in order to habitual skill. Complete Dictionary
  48. To use exercise, to labour for health. Complete Dictionary

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