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Definitions of general

  1. of worldwide scope or applicability; "an issue of cosmopolitan import"; "the shrewdest political and ecumenical comment of our time"- Christopher Morley; "universal experience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. command as a general; "We are generaled by an incompetent!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a fact about the whole (as opposed to particular); "he discussed the general but neglected the particular" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. prevailing among and common to the general public; "the general discontent" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. not specialized or limited to one class of things; "general studies"; "general knowledge" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. applying to all or most members of a category or group; "the general public"; "general assistance"; "a general rule"; "in general terms"; "comprehensible to the general reader" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. of national scope; "a general election" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (medicine) affecting the entire body; "a general anesthetic"; "general symptoms" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. somewhat indefinite; "bearing a general resemblance to the original"; "a general description of the merchandise" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a general officer of the highest rank Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. the head of a religious order or congregation Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. affecting the entire body; "a general anesthetic"; "general symptoms" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. Relating to a genus or kind; pertaining to a whole class or order; as, a general law of animal or vegetable economy. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Comprehending many species or individuals; not special or particular; including all particulars; as, a general inference or conclusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Not restrained or limited to a precise import; not specific; vague; indefinite; lax in signification; as, a loose and general expression. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Common to many, or the greatest number; widely spread; prevalent; extensive, though not universal; as, a general opinion; a general custom. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Having a relation to all; common to the whole; as, Adam, our general sire. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. As a whole; in gross; for the most part. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Usual; common, on most occasions; as, his general habit or method. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. One of the chief military officers of a government or country; the commander of an army, of a body of men not less than a brigade. In European armies, the highest military rank next below field marshal. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The roll of the drum which calls the troops together; as, to beat the general. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The chief of an order of monks, or of all the houses or congregations under the same rule. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The public; the people; the vulgar. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The whole; the total; that which comprehends or relates to all, or the chief part; - opposed to particular. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The whole; the commander of an army division or brigade. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. Relating to a whole genus, kind, class, order, or race; not special or particular; pertaining to the majority; usual; ordinary; extensive but not universal; indefinite; senior or highest; as, Postmaster-General. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. Generally. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Relating to a genus or whole class: including many species: not special: not restricted: common: prevalent r public: loose: vague. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. The whole or chief part: an officer who is head over a whole department: a military officer who commands a body of men not less than a brigade: the chief commander of an army in service: in the R. C. Church, the head of a religious order, responsible only to the Pope. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Common; prevalent; public; vague. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. Officer commanding not less than a brigade; chief commander of an army. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. Pertaining to a genus; relating to all of a class. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Large; sweeping; indefinite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Common; customary; wide-spread. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Viewed as a whole. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. An officer who commands any body of troops not less than a brigade. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A general principle, statement, or notion; totality. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Relating to a whole class; comprehending many species; not special; not restricted to a particular import, or not specific; common; not directed to a single object; vague; usual. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. The whole; the chief part; the commander of an army; also the second in rank, or lieutenant-general, the commander of a division, or major-general, and the commander of a brigade, or brigadier-general-all general officers being above the rank of colonel; particular beat of drum or march, which, in the morning, gives notice for the infantry to be in readiness to march; the chief of an order of monks, or of all the houses or congregations under the same rule. A general term, a term denoting a whole class. In general, in the main; for most part. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Relating to a whole class or order; not special or particular; public; common; extensive; usual. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. The whole; the total; the chief commander of an army; the commander of a division. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. The whole; the total; that which comprehends or relates to all, or the chief part; -- opposed to particular. mso.anu.edu.au
  43. Pertaining to, or designating, the genus or class, as distinguished fromthat which characterizes the spccics or individual. Universal, not particularized; as opposedto special. Principal or central; as opposed to local. Open or available to all, asopposed to select. Obtaining commonly, or recognized universally; as opposed to particular.Universal or unbounded; as opposed to limited. Comprehending the whole, ordirected to the whole; as distinguished from anything applying to or designed for a portion only.As a noun, the word is the title of a principal officer in the army, usually one whocommands a whole army, division, corps, or brigade. In the United States army, therank of "general'' is the highest possible, next to the commander in chief, and is onlyoccasionally created. The officers next in rank are lieutenant general, major general,and brigadier general. thelawdictionary.org
  44. This word has several meanings, namely: 1. A principal officer, particularly in the army. 2. Something opposed to special; as, a general verdict, the general issue, which expressions are used in contradistinction to special verdict, special issue. 3. Principal, as the general post office. 4. Not select, as a general ship. (q. v.) 5. Not particular, as a general custom. 6. Not limited, as general jurisdiction. 7. This word is sometimes annexed or prefixed to other words to express or limit the extent of their signification; as Attorney General, Solicitor General, the General Assembly, &c. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  45. jen'[.e]r-al, adj. relating to a genus or whole class: including many species: not special: not restricted: common: prevalent: public: loose: vague.--n. a class embracing many species: an officer who is head over a whole department: a military officer who commands a body of men not less than a brigade (often general officer): the chief commander of an army in service: (R.C. Church) the head of a religious order, responsible only to the Pope: (Shak.) the public, the vulgar.--n. GENERAL'[=E], esp. in pl. GENERALIA, general principles.--adj. GENERAL[=I]'SABLE.--n. GENERALIS[=A]'TION.--v.t. GENERAL[=I]SE', to include under a general term: to infer (the nature of a class) from one or a few instances.--v.i. to reason inductively.--n. GENERAL'ITY.--advs. GEN'ERALLY, GEN'ERAL (obs.), in a general or collective manner or sense: in most cases: upon the whole.--n. GEN'ERALSHIP, the position of a military commander: military tactics.--GENERAL ASSEMBLY (see ASSEMBLY); GENERAL EPISTLE, one addressed to the whole Church (same as CATHOLIC EPISTLE); GENERAL PRACTITIONER, a physician who devotes himself to general practice rather than to special diseases; GENERAL PRINCIPLE, a principle to which there are no exceptions within its range of application; GENERAL SERVANT, a servant whose duties are not special, but embrace domestic work of every kind.--IN GENERAL, mostly, as a general rule. [O. Fr.,--L. generalis--genus.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  46. [Latin] Of, pertaining to, or characterizing a class or set; diffused among many individuals or over many or all parts of a complex whole; not local, partial, or restricted; especially, affecting or applied to the whole body, as G. diseases, G. anaemia, G. anaesthesia, G. anaesthetic, G. electrization (including G. galvanization and G. faradization). G. anatomy, see Anatomy. G. paralysis, G. paresis, a variety of insanity, due to degeneration and atrophy of the nerve-fibres and neurons of the brain; marked by progressive dementia, which is characterized usually by delusions of grandeur, in which the patient exaggerates enormously his own rank, position, ability, or possessions, and which is accompanied earlier or later by progressive paresis, involving ultimately all the voluntary muscles. It is a common affection, popularly known as softening of the brain, and is almost invariably fatal in from a few months to five or six years. na
  47. Completely or approximately universal, including or affecting all or nearly all parts, not partial, particular, local, or sectional, (g. confession, to be made by whole congregation; g. council, summoned by invitation to the Church at large; g. ELECTION; German Post Office, head office in London; German Post, first morning delivery, also name of indoor game); prevalent, widespread, usual, (in a g. way, ordinarily); not limited in application, relating to whole class of objects, occasions, &c., true of all or (opp. universal) nearly all cases (as a g. rule, in most cases), including points common to individuals of a class& neglecting differences (g. word, term, notion); not restricted to one department, not specialized, (g. dealer, trader in many articles; g. practitioner, doctor treating cases of all kinds; g. servant, maid-of-all-work; g. reader, of miscellaneous literature); roughly corresponding or adequate, sufficient for practical purposes, (g. resemblance, idea); vague, indefinite, (spoke only in g. terms); (Mil., of officer) above rank of colonel; (appended to titles, as ADJUTANT-g., ATTORNEY-g., POSTmaster-g.) chief, head, with unrestricted authority or sphere, (also joc. with other nn., as lover-g., one who makes love to all women); in g., generally, in all ordinary cases, barring special exceptions, for the most part. (N.) the g. (archaic), the public; (pl.; now rare) g. principles, notions, or rules; chief of religious order, e.g. of Jesuits, Dominicans; (Mil.) officer next below Field-Marshal (also by courtesy of lieutenant-g. & major-g.); commander of army; tactician, strategist, of specified merit (a good, bad, great, g.; nog.); =g. servant above (colloq.). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. This grade was first created by Act of Congress March 3, 1799, and General Washington was appointed to fill it. The office was abolished in 1802. It was not revived again until 1866, when General Grant was appointed. On the election of Grant to the Presidency, William T. Sherman succeeded him in the grade of general. On the retirement of General Sherman, November 1, 1883, the office again became extinct. It was revived for a brief time (June to August, 1888), for Lieutenant-General Philip H. Sheridan. Since his death in 1888 the office has ceased to exist, as has that of lieutenant-general. Dictionary of United States history
  49. n. The whole; the total;—the main or chief part;—the public; the vulgar;—the chief or head of a body or community;—the commander of an army;—a military officer commanding a brigade or division of an army. Cabinet Dictionary
  50. Comprehending many species or individuals, not special; lax in signification, not restrained to any special or particular import; not restrained by narrow or distinctive limitations; relating to a whole class or body of men; publick, comprising the whole; extensive; though not universal; common, usual. Complete Dictionary
  51. The whole, the totality; the public, the interest of the whole; the vulgar; one that has the command over an army. Complete Dictionary

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