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Definitions of dry

  1. become dry or drier; "The laundry dries in the sun" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a reformer who opposes the use of intoxicating beverages Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. practicing complete abstinence from alcoholic beverages; "he's been dry for ten years"; "no thank you; I happen to be teetotal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. lacking warmth or emotional involvement; "a dry greeting"; "a dry reading of the lines"; "a dry critique" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. having a large proportion of strong liquor; "a very dry martini is almost straight gin" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. without a mucous or watery discharge; "a dry cough"; "that rare thing in the wintertime; a small child with a dry nose" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. humorously sarcastic or mocking; "dry humor"; "an ironic remark often conveys an intended meaning obliquely"; "an ironic novel"; "an ironical smile"; "with a wry Scottish wit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. suffering from fluid deprivation; "his mouth was dry" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. having no adornment or coloration; "dry facts"; "rattled off the facts in a dry mechanical manner" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. not producing milk; "a dry cow" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. used of solid substances in contrast with liquid ones; "dry weight" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. remove the moisture from and make dry; "dry clothes"; "dry hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. lacking interest or stimulation; dull and lifeless; "a dry book"; "a dry lecture filled with trivial details"; "dull and juiceless as only book knowledge can be when it is unrelated to...life"- John Mason Brown Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. (of food) eaten without a spread or sauce or other garnish; "dry toast"; "dry meat" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. unproductive especially of the expected results; "a dry run"; "a mind dry of new ideas" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. (of wines) not sweet because of decomposition of sugar during fermentation; "a dry white burgundy" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. not shedding tears; "dry sobs"; "with dry eyes" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. free from liquid or moisture; lacking natural or normal moisture or depleted of water; or no longer wet; "dry land"; "dry clothes"; "a dry climate"; "dry splintery boards"; "a dry river bed"; "the paint is dry" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. opposed to or prohibiting the production and sale of alcoholic beverages; "the dry vote led by preachers and bootleggers"; "a dry state" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. Of vegetable matter: Free from juices or sap; not succulent; not green; as, dry wood or hay. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Of animals: Not giving milk; as, the cow is dry. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Of persons: Thirsty; needing drink. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Of the eyes: Not shedding tears. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Of certain morbid conditions, in which there is entire or comparative absence of moisture; as, dry gangrene; dry catarrh. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Destitute of that which interests or amuses; barren; unembellished; jejune; plain. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Characterized by a quality somewhat severe, grave, or hard; hence, sharp; keen; shrewd; quaint; as, a dry tone or manner; dry wit. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Exhibiting a sharp, frigid preciseness of execution, or the want of a delicate contour in form, and of easy transition in coloring. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To make dry; to free from water, or from moisture of any kind, and by any means; to exsiccate; as, to dry the eyes; to dry one's tears; the wind dries the earth; to dry a wet cloth; to dry hay. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To grow dry; to become free from wetness, moisture, or juice; as, the road dries rapidly. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To shrivel or wither; to lose vitality. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Free from moisture; having little humidity or none; arid; not wet or moist; deficient in the natural or normal supply of moisture, as rain or fluid of any kind; - said especially: (a) Of the weather: Free from rain or mist. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To evaporate wholly; to be exhaled; - said of moisture, or a liquid; - sometimes with up; as, the stream dries, or dries up. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Free from moisture or wetness; not yielding juices; without interest; unintentionally humorous or quaint; without sweetness or fruity flavor; thirsty; solid, as opposed to liquid; as, dry measure. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. To free from moisture or juice; stop the flow of; parch. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. To lose or be deprived of moisture. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. Dryly, drily. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Dryness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Drier. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Driest. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. Free from moisture: deficient in moisture: without sap: not green: not giving milk: thirsty: uninteresting: frigid, precise. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. To free from water or moisture: to exhaust. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To become dry: to become free from juice: to evaporate entirely:-pr.p. drying; pa.p. dried'. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Thirsty. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. Dryly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To make dry. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. Without moisture; without rain; not giving milk; uninteresting; precise; sarcastic. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. To make or become dry; evaporate; wither; often followed by up. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Lacking moisture; not fresh; not green. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. Lacking interest; lifeless; dull. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. Slyly jocose or satirical. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. Destitute of moisture; free from rain or mist; free from juice, sap, oraqueous matter; without tears; not giving milk; thirsty; jejune; without interest; severe; sarcastic; formally cold or precise; sharply or frigidly precise in execution, or wanting a delicate contour in form. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To free from or deprive of water or moisture; to deprive of natural juice, sap, or greenness; to scorch or parch with thirst; to drain; to exhaust. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. To grow dry; to evaporate wholly; to be exhaled. To dry up, to deprive wholly of water; to wither; to suspend talking for want of matter. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. Free from water or moisture; not rainy not juicy; arid; thirsty; barren; void of interest, as applied to persons; sarcastic; severe; humorous. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. To free from water or moisture, as by wiping; to lose moisture. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  56. [Anglo-Saxon] Appl. achenial, capsular, and schizocarpic fruits. Opp. succulent. na
  57. Free from moisture; having little humidity or none; arid; not wet or moist; deficient in the natural or normal supply of moisture, as rain or fluid of any kind; -- said especially: a Of the weather: Free from rain or mist. mso.anu.edu.au
  58. To evaporate wholly; to be exhaled; -- said of moisture, or a liquid; -- sometimes with up; as, the stream dries, or dries up. mso.anu.edu.au
  59. dr[=i], adj. free from, deficient in, moisture, sap: not green: not giving milk: thirsty: uninteresting: (obs.) hard: frigid, precise: free from sweetness and fruity flavour (of wines, &c.).--v.t. to free from water or moisture: to exhaust.--v.i. to become dry, to evaporate entirely--both used also with prep. up:--pr.p. dry'ing; pa.p. dried.--n. and adj. DRY'ASDUST, the pretended editor or introducer of some of Scott's novels--a synonym for a dull and pedantic though learned person.--v.t. DRY'-BEAT (Shak.), to beat severely, or so as to be dry.--ns. DRY'-BOB, a slang name used at Eton for boys who play cricket, football, &c.--opp. to the Wet-bob, who makes rowing his recreation; DRY'-DOCK (see DOCK).--adj. DRY'-EYED, tearless.--n. DRY'-FOOT (Shak.), like a dog which pursues game by the scent of its foot.--n.pl. DRY'-GOODS, drapery, &c., as distinguished from groceries, hardware, &c.--n. DRY'-LIGHT, a clear, unobstructed light: an unprejudiced view.--advs. DRY'LY, DR[=I]'LY.--ns. DRY'-MEAS'URE (see MEASURE); DRY'NESS; DRY'-NURSE, a nurse who feeds a child without milk from the breast; DRY'-PLATE, a sensitised photographic plate, with which a picture may be made without the preliminary use of a bath; DRY'-POINT, a sharp needle by which fine lines are drawn in copperplate engraving; DRY'-ROT, a decay of timber caused by fungi which reduce it to a dry, brittle mass: (fig.) a concealed decay or degeneration.--v.t. DRY'-SALT, to cure meat by salting and drying.--ns. DRY'SALTER, a dealer in gums, dyes, drugs, &c.: (obs.) or in salted or dry meats, pickles, &c.; DRY'SALTERY.--adj. DRY'-SHOD, without wetting the shoes or feet.--n. DRY'-STEAM, steam containing no unevaporated water.--adj. DRY'-STONE, built of stone without mortar, as some walls.--n. DRY'-STOVE, a kind of hot-house for preserving the plants of dry, warm climates.--CUT AND DRIED (see CUT).--HIGH AND DRY (see HIGH). [A.S. dr['y]ge; cf. Dut. droog, Ger. trocken.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  60. Not wet or moist; accomplished without the use of liquids, as D. treatment of wounds; unaccompanied by moisture or liquid exudation, as D. cough, D. gangrene, D. pleurisy; not associated with bleeding, as D. cupping. D. caries, rarefying osteitis. na
  61. (drier, -est). Without moisture (d. eyes, free from tears); not rainy, with deficient rainfall; parched, dried up, (colloq.) thirsty, (of liquid) having disappeared by evaporation, draining, wiping, &c.; not yielding water, milk, &c. (cow, well, is d.); not submerged (d. land, tide leaves it d.); without butter (d. bread, toast); solid, not liquid, (d. goods, see below; d. measure, measure of capacity for these); (of wine) free from sweetness& fruity flavour; unconnected with liquid (die a d. death, not by drowning or bloodshed; d. cough, without phlegm; d.-BOB); impassive, unsympathetic, stiff, hard, cold, (d. jest, sarcasm, humour, expressed in matter-of-fact tone with show of unconsciousness); meagre, plain, bare, not enlarged upon, (d. facts, thanks); uninteresting, dull, unprofitable; untinged by prejudice or interest (d. light); d.-bulb thermometer, one of pair in hygrometer with wet& d. bulbs; d. cooper, maker of casks for d. goods; d.-cure, cure (meat &c.) without pickling in liquid; d.-DOCK; d.-fly a. & v.i., (fish) with fly dangled just over water; d. goods, non-liquid goods, as corn, also (esp. United States) drapery, mercery, haberdashery; d. lodging, without board; d.-nurse, tending but not suckling child, (v.t.) bring up by hand; d. pile, electric pile or battery in which no liquid is used; d.-plate, photographic plate with sensitized film hard& d. for convenience of keeping, developing at leisure, &c.; d.-point, needle for engraving without acid on bare copper plate (also v.i., use this process, & n., engraving produced so); d.-rot, decayed state of wood not exposed to air caused, by fungi, also the fungi, (fig.) unsuspected moral or social decay; d.-salt v.t., =d. -cure; dry-salter (y), dealer, dealing or shop that deals, in drugs, dyes, gums, oils, pickles, tinned meats, &c.; d.-shod a. or adv., without wetting the feet. Hence dryish a., drily (or dryly) adv. (esp. in fig. senses), dryness n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  62. Make or become d. by wiping, evaporation, draining, &c.; cause (cow) to cease giving milk; d. up, make utterly d., (of moisture) disappear utterly, (of well &c.) cease to yield water, (colloq., esp. in imperat.) cease talking or doing something. Hence drier (1,2) (also dryer) n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  63. Free from moisture. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  64. Unaccompanied by a flow of liquid or a pathological discharge. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  65. Free from an excess of sugar. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  66. Thirsty. [Ang.-Sax.] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  67. Arid, not wet, not moist; without rain; not succulent, not juicy; without tears; thirsty, athirst; jejune, barren, unembellished. Complete Dictionary

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