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Definitions of lever

  1. to move or force, esp. in an effort to get something open; "The burglar jimmied the lock", "Raccoons managed to pry the lid off the garbage pail" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a rigid bar pivoted about a fulcrum Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a flat metal tumbler in a lever lock Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a simple machine that gives a mechanical advantage when given a fulcrum Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. to move or force, especially in an effort to get something open; "The burglar jimmied the lock", "Raccoons managed to pry the lid off the garbage pail" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. More agreeable; more pleasing. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Rather. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A rigid piece which is capable of turning about one point, or axis (the fulcrum), and in which are two or more other points where forces are applied; -- used for transmitting and modifying force and motion. Specif., a bar of metal, wood, or other rigid substance, used to exert a pressure, or sustain a weight, at one point of its length, by receiving a force or power at a second, and turning at a third on a fixed point called a fulcrum. It is usually named as the first of the six mechanical powers, and is of three kinds, according as either the fulcrum F, the weight W, or the power P, respectively, is situated between the other two, as in the figures. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A bar, as a capstan bar, applied to a rotatory piece to turn it. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. An arm on a rock shaft, to give motion to the shaft or to obtain motion from it. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A bar of metal, etc., turning on a support (fulcrum) and raising a weight. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. A bar of metal or other substance turning on a support called the fulcrum or prop, for raising weights. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. Bar turning on a fulcrum, for applying power. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. A bar, turning on a fulcrum, to apply power. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. A bar of metal, wood, or other substance, turning on a support called the fulcrum or prop, and contrived originally to raise heavy weights; a lever-watch. Lever-watch, a watch with a lever escapement. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. A strong bar of iron or wood, turning on a support or prop called a fulcrum; one of the mechanical powers. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. A rigid piece which is capable of turning about one point, or axis (the fulcrum), and in which are two or more other points where forces are applied; used for transmitting and modifying force and motion. Specif., a bar of metal, wood, or other rigid substance, used to exert a pressure, or sustain a weight, at one point of its length, by receiving a force or power at a second, and turning at a third on a fixed point called a fulcrum. It is usually named as the first of the six mechanical powers, and is of three kinds, according as either the fulcrum F, the weight W, or the power P, respectively, is situated between the other two, as in the figures. dictgcide_fs
  18. l[=e]'v[.e]r, n. a bar of metal or other substance turning on a support called the fulcrum or prop, for imparting pressure or motion from a source of power to a resistance--of three kinds, according to the relative positions of the power, weight, and fulcrum: (fig.) anything which exerts influence: any one of various tools on the principle defined above--in surgery, dentistry, &c.: a removable rod or bar inserted in a machine, to be operated by hand leverage.--ns. L[=E]'VERAGE, the mechanical power gained by the use of the lever: advantage gained for any purpose; L[=E]'VER-WATCH, a watch having a vibrating lever in the mechanism of the escapement. [Fr. levier--lever--L. lev[=a]re, to raise.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  19. l[=e]'v[.e]r, adv. an obsolete comp. of lief. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. An inflexible rod, turning round a fixed point, and used for moving bodies, bearing burdens, or raising them. The point on which the lever moves is called the Fulcrum, Hypomochlion. The force which moves the lever is called the power; and the weight to be moved, the resistance. There are three kinds of levers. A lever of the first kind has the fulcrum between the power and resistance. A lever of the second kind has the resintance between the fulcrum and power; whilst a lever of the third kind has the power between the fulcrum and resistance. In the locomotive system of the human body, we have examples of all the three kinds. The bones represent levers; the muscles of locomotion are powers; the weight of parts to be moved constitutes the resistance. The fulcra, are, at times, the joints; at others, the ground, etc. The head moves of the neck, as a lever of the first kind; the first cervical vertebra forming the fulcrum. We rise on tiptoe by a lever of the second kind, the fulcrum being the ground under the toes; and we have examples of a lever of the third kind in the flexion of the fore-arm on the arm, in the elevation of the arm, etc. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  21. (F.) Levier, is an instrument curved at the extremity, and having a fenestra. It is used to assist the extraction of the child's head, when instrumental aid is necessary. Levers are, also, used by the dentist for extracting stumps, etc. The Levier de l’ecluse, Langue de Carpe, Trivelin or Punch, is employed for extracting the molar teeth. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  22. [Latin] An appliance for lifting weights or otherwise exerting force, consisting of a straight bar turning upon a fixed support (fulcrum). The power employed and the resistance to be overcome are applied at different points of the arm; their respective distances from the fulcrum being called the arms of the l. na
  23. Bar used to prize up heavy or fixed object; (Mech.) straight bar or other rigid structure of which one point (fulcrum) is fixed, another is connected with the force (weight) to be resisted or acted upon, & a third is connected with the force (power) applied (l. of first order with fulcrum, of second order with weight, of third order with power, between the other two); piece by which barrel of breechloader is opened; =l.-watch; l.-, acting as or worked by l.; l.-escapement, with connexion between pallet& balance made by two ll.; l.-watch, with l.-escapement. (Vb) use l.; lift, move, act on, with l. (often along, away, out, over, up, &c.). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  24. [L.] A rod or bar (e.g. a crowbar or a poker) caused by a power to move round a fixed point (or fulcrum) and thereby overcome a resistance or raise a weight. The distances from the fulcrum to the points of application of power and weight are the arms of the lever. If the arms are not in a straight line it is a Bent L. Many simple machines consist of a combination of two levers (e.g. a pair of nut-crackers, a pair of scissors, etc.); these are called Double levers. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  25. n. [French] A bar of metal, wood, or other substance, used to exert a pressure or sustain a weight at one point of its length by receiving a force or power at a second, and turning at a third on a fixed point called a fulcrum. Cabinet Dictionary

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