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Definitions of life

  1. the condition of living or the state of being alive; "while there's life there's hope"; "life depends on many chemical and physical processes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an account of the series of events making up a person's life Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the period from the present until death; "he appointed himself emperor for life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. living things collectively; "the oceans are teeming with life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. animation and energy in action or expression; "it was a heavy play and the actors tried in vain to give life to it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the experience of living; the course of human events and activities; "he could no longer cope with the complexities of life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a living person; "his heroism saved a life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the organic phenomenon that distinguishes living organisms from nonliving ones; "there is no life on the moon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the course of existence of an individual; the actions and events that occur in living; "he hoped for a new life in Australia"; "he wanted to live his own life without interference from others" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the period during which something is functional (as between birth and death); "the battery had a short life"; "he lived a long and happy life" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a motive for living; "pottery was his life" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. a characteristic state or mode of living; "social life"; "city life"; "real life" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. the period between birth and the present time; "I have known him all his life" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. a prison term lasting as long as the prisoner lives; "he got life for killing the guard" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. The state of being which begins with generation, birth, or germination, and ends with death; also, the time during which this state continues; that state of an animal or plant in which all or any of its organs are capable of performing all or any of their functions; -- used of all animal and vegetable organisms. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The potential principle, or force, by which the organs of animals and plants are started and continued in the performance of their several and cooperative functions; the vital force, whether regarded as physical or spiritual. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Figuratively: The potential or animating principle, also, the period of duration, of anything that is conceived of as resembling a natural organism in structure or functions; as, the life of a state, a machine, or a book; authority is the life of government. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A certain way or manner of living with respect to conditions, circumstances, character, conduct, occupation, etc.; hence, human affairs; also, lives, considered collectively, as a distinct class or type; as, low life; a good or evil life; the life of Indians, or of miners. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Animation; spirit; vivacity; vigor; energy. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. That which imparts or excites spirit or vigor; that upon which enjoyment or success depends; as, he was the life of the company, or of the enterprise. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The living or actual form, person, thing, or state; as, a picture or a description from the life. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A person; a living being, usually a human being; as, many lives were sacrificed. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The system of animal nature; animals in general, or considered collectively. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. An essential constituent of life, esp. the blood. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A history of the acts and events of a life; a biography; as, Johnson wrote the life of Milton. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Enjoyment in the right use of the powers; especially, a spiritual existence; happiness in the favor of God; heavenly felicity. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Subsistence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Something dear to one as one's existence; a darling; - used as a term of endearment. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The state that distinguishes organisms from inorganic matter, manifested by growth, metabolism, reproduction, and adaptation. It includes the course of existence, the sum of experiences, the mode of existing, or the fact of being. Over the centuries inquiries into the nature of life have crossed the boundaries from philosophy to biology, forensic medicine, anthropology, etc., in creative as well as scientific literature. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division) Medical Dictionary DB
  30. The state of being alive; living existence; vitality; union of soul and body; a living person; as, but one life was saved; living beings collectvely; as, animal life; period between birth and death; as, all the years of a man's life; manner of living; as, a life of pleasure; a biography; as, the life of Tennyson; animation; as, to be full of life; the moving spirit; as, he was the life of the housebold. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. 1. Vitality, the essential condition of existence of animals and plants; the state of existence characterized by metabolism. 2. The period of utility of any object, as of an electric battery, for example. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  32. State of existence. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  33. State of living: animate existence: union of soul and body: the period between birth and death: present state of existence: manner of living: moral conduct: animation: a living being: system of animal nature: social state: human affairs: narrative of a life: eternal happiness, also He who bestows it: a quickening principle in a moral sense:-pl. LIVES, livz. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. Animate existence; manner of living; animation; human affairs; biography. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. The state of being alive; vital principle; vitality. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Animate existence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Human affairs. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A biography. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. That state of an animal and a plant in which it is capable of performing its natural functions; animate existence; the union of soul and body; the present state of existence; the time from birth to death; period of existence; manner of living; conduct in regard to morals; course of living; source of living; soul; blood, the supposed vehicle of animation; animals in general; animal being; system of animal nature; spirit; animation; resolution; the living form; general state of man, or of social manners; rank in society; human affairs; a person; biographical narration; supreme felicity; the Author and Giver of supreme felicity; a quickening principle. See Live. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Of human beings: The union of the soul and body; also, the duration of their union; sometimes, the deathless quality or existence of the soul; as, man is a creature having an immortal life. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. The vital force or state of an organised being; manner of living; human affairs; course of things; conduct; period of existence; time between birth and death; spirit or animation; living form, as opposed to a copy; general state of man; a narrative or history of a person; animated existence; eternal happiness in heaven; position or rank in society. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. That state of animals and plants, or of an organized being, in which its natural functions and motions are performed, or in which its organs are capable of performing their functions. Webster. The sum of the forces by which death is resisted. Richat. thelawdictionary.org
  43. Something dear to one as one's existence; a darling; -- used as a term of endearment. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. generally of physical life ( Genesis 2:7 ; Luke 16:25 , etc.); also used figuratively (1) for immortality ( Hebrews 7:16 ); (2) conduct or manner of life ( Romans 6:4 ); (3) spiritual life or salvation ( John 3:16 John 3:17 John 3:18 John 3:36 ); (4) eternal life ( Matthew 19:16 Matthew 19:17 ; John 3:15 ); of God and Christ as the absolute source and cause of all life ( John 1:4 ; John 5:26 John 5:39 ; 11:25 ; 12:50 ). biblestudytools.com
  45. The state of being which begins with generation, birth, or germination, and ends with death; also, the time during which this state continues; that state of an animal or plant in which all or any of its organs are capable of performing all or any of their functions; used of all animal and vegetable organisms. dictgcide_fs
  46. Something dear to one as one's existence; a darling; used as a term of endearment. dictgcide_fs
  47. l[=i]f, n. state of living: animate existence: union of soul and body: the period between birth and death: present state of existence: manner of living: moral conduct: animation: a living being: system of animal nature: social state: human affairs: narrative of a life: eternal happiness, also He who bestows it: a quickening principle in a moral sense: the living form and expression, living semblance: (cricket) an escape, as by a missed or dropped catch:--pl. LIVES (l[=i]vz).--interj. used as an oath, abbreviated from God's life.--adj. LIFE'-AND-DEATH', critical: desperate.--ns. LIFE'-ANN[=U]'ITY, a sum paid to a person yearly during life; LIFE'-ASSUR'ANCE, LIFE'-INSUR'ANCE (see INSURANCE); LIFE'-BELT, a belt either inflated with air, or with cork attached, for sustaining a person in the water; LIFE'-BLOOD, the blood of an animal in the body: that which gives strength or life; LIFE'BOAT, a boat for saving shipwrecked persons, having air-chambers or the like, by which it is rendered specially buoyant and sometimes self-righting; LIFE'-BUOY, a buoy intended to support a person in the water till he can be rescued; LIFE'-ESTATE', an estate held during the life of the possessor.--adjs. LIFE'FUL (Spens.), full of vital energy; LIFE'-GIV'ING, imparting life: invigorating.--ns. LIFE'-GUARD, a guard of the life or person: a guard of a prince or other dignitary; LIFE'-HIS'TORY, LIFE'-CY'CLE, the series of vital phenomena exhibited by an organism in its passage from the ovum to full development; LIFE'HOLD, land held by lease for life; LIFE'-IN'TEREST, an interest lasting during one's life.--adj. LIFE'LESS, dead: without vigour: insipid: sluggish.--adv. LIFE'LESSLY.--n. LIFE'LESSNESS.--adj. LIFE'-LIKE, like a living person.--n. LIFE'-LINE, a rope stretched anywhere on board a vessel for support of the sailors in difficult operations or during wild weather: a line attached to a life-buoy or lifeboat for an immersed person to seize hold of.--adj. LIFE'LONG, during the length of a life.--ns. LIFE'-MOR'TAR, a mortar for throwing a shot of some kind to carry a rope from the shore to a ship in distress; LIFE'-PEER, a peer whose title is not hereditary; LIFE'-PEER'AGE; LIFE'-PRESERV'ER, an invention, as a buoyant belt or jacket, for the preservation of life in cases of shipwreck: a cane with a loaded head; LIFE'-RAFT, a raft-like structure for use in case of shipwreck; LIFE'-RATE, rate of payment on a policy of life-insurance.--adj. LIFE'-REN'DERING (Shak.), yielding up life.--ns. LIFE'RENT, a rent that continues for life; LIFE'RENTER, one who enjoys a liferent:--fem. LIFE'RENTRIX; LIFE'-ROCK'ET, a rocket for carrying a line from the shore to a ship in distress.--adjs. LIFE'-SAV'ING, designed to save life, esp. from drowning.--n. LIFE'-SCHOOL, a school where artists work from living models.--adjs. LIFE'-SIZE, similar in size to the object represented; LIFE'SOME, full of life: gay, lively.--ns. LIFE'-T[=A]'BLE, a table of statistics as to the probability of life at different ages; LIFE'-TEN'ANT, the owner of a life-estate: one who holds lands, &c., for the term of his own or another's life; LIFE'-TIME, continuation or duration of life.--adj. LIFE'-WEA'RY (Shak.), weary of life: wretched.--n. LIFE'-WORK, the work to which one's life is or is to be devoted.--LIFE-SAVING APPARATUS, all materials, appliances, &c. available for preserving life in cases of shipwreck or fire.--BRING TO LIFE, to restore to life one apparently dead; COME TO LIFE, to be reanimated; FOR LIFE, for the whole period of one's existence: so as to save life: very fast or strenuously; HIGH LIFE, the manner of living of those in high or fashionable society: the upper classes of society; LINE OF LIFE (see LINE); TO THE LIFE, very closely resembling the original: exactly drawn. [A.S. líf; Ice. líf, Sw. lif, Dut. lijf, body, life; Ger. leben, to live.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. The state of organized beiugs, during which, owing to the union of an unknown force with matter, they are capable of performing functions different from those that regulate other natural bodies; all of which functions, however numerous and diversified, work to one end. Life has only a limited duration; beyond which,-the organic functions ceasing to be executed,-the body is given up to the agency of chemical affinity. Hence Bichat has defined life to be- the aggregate of the functions which resist death. On account of the difference that exists among the vital functions, he applied the term Organic Life to the functions inservient to composition and decomposition ;-as digestion, respiration, circulation, calorification, absorption, secretion, and nutrition; and Animal Life, to the functions which connect man and animals with external bodies; as the understanding, sensations, locomotion and voice. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  49. The state in which an organized being exhibits some or all of its characteristic properties; the state in which an organism and its separate parts through their own inherent qualities perform assimilation and dis-assimilation, grow and decay. L. which is confined in its manifestations to the performance simply of those acts which are requisite for the maintenance of the existence of the individual and for the propagation of the species –namely, the acts of ingestion, digestion, assimilation, secretion, excretion, mechanical reflex action, and reproduction–is called Vegetative; which in addition comprises the employment of the senses, with locomotion and other spontaneous movements, is called Animal; while l. in which the reason, feelings, and conscious exercise of the will are called into play is called Mental (Psychic or Intellectual). The Feel l. is to feel the fetal movements. na
  50. (pl. -ves). State of ceaseless change& functional activity peculiar to organized matter, & esp. to the portion of it constituting an animal or plant before death, animate existence, being alive, (a matter of l. & death, something on which it depends whether one shall live or die; NECESSARY, STAFF, of l.; come, bring, to l., recover (i. & t.) from swoon; lose, save, lay down, one\'s l.; safe in, escape with, l. & limb; SELL one\'s l. dearly; great sacrifice of l., many killed; have no regard for human l., kill men or let them die recklessly; for one\'s, for dear, l., to escape death; cannot for the l. of me &c. by exag., could not if my l. depended on it; \'pon my l., asseveration); energy, liveliness, vivacity, animation; vivifying influence (was the l., or l. & soul, of the party; my l., voc. of affection); living things& their motions (very little l. to be seen); the living form or model, l.-size figure &c., (taken from the l.; as large as l., l.-size, also facet. as here he is as l. as l., i.e. in person; portray &c. to the l., with fidelity to the original), whence lifelike a.; period from birth to death, birth to present time, or present time to death (have done it all my l.; l. sentence, rent, annuity, to continue for rest of person\'s l.; lease for three &c. ll., to terminate with last of three &c. named persons\' ll.; l. ASSURANCE; INSURE one\'s l.; expectation of l., average period that person at specified age may expect to live; a good, bad, l., person likely to pass, fall short of, this average; new LEASE of l.), fresh start after narrowly escaped lit. or metaph. death (cat has nine ll., is hard to kill; batsman was given a l., not put out on giving a chance; pool-player has three ll., successive chances); individual\'s actions& fortunes, manner of existence, (with all the pleasure in l., greatest possible; nothing in l., at all; this l., that on earth; the other, future, eternal, everlasting, l., state of existence after death; the SIMPLE l.; has led a good &c. l.), written story of these, biography; active part of existence, business& pleasures of the world, (see life, mix freely with others); (Theol.) salvation, regenerate condition, (also cternal, everlasting, l., see above also). L.-belt, of buoyant material to support body in water; l.-blood, blood necessary to l., vitalizing influence, involuntary twitching of lip or eyelid; l.-boat, of special construction for saving l. in storms; l.-breath, inspiring influence, sustaining principle; l.-BUOY; l.-estate, property that one holds for l. but cannot dispose of further; l.- giving, that gives, sustains, or restores, physical or spiritual l.; l.-guard, body-guard of soldiers; Latin Guards, two regiments of household cavalry; Latin Guardsman, soldier of Latin Guards; l.-interest, right to l.-estate; l.-jacket, as l.-belt; l.-line, rope used for l.-saving, e.g. that attached to l.-buoy; lifelong, continued for a lifetime; l.-office, for l.-assurance; l.-peer-( age), with title lapsing at death; l.-preserver, short stick with heavily loaded end; l.-spring, source of l.; l.-strings, hold on l. (l.-s. are cut or broken, person dies); l.-table, statistics of expectation of l.; lifetime, duration of person\'s l.; l.-work, task pursued through l. Hence lifeless a., lifelessly adv., lifelessness n., (-) lived a. (esp. long-, short-). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  51. That existence which is characterized by the power an organized being (an animal or a plant) has to assimilate from its surroundings material for its support, to change its form by growth, and to reproduce its kind. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  52. The state of an organized being before permanent cessation of the distinctive vital functions. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  53. The condition or manner of living. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  54. n. [Anglo-Saxon] State of being; existence;— animation : vitality;— condition of organized bodies, as plants or animals, in which they exercise functional, active, and reproductive powers;— in man, the union of a living soul with the body the time from birth to death; period of living;— manner of living; conduct; deportment;— condition; course, as of prosperity or misery blood, as the supposed source of animation;— animal being;— the living form, as opposed to a copy; exact resemblance;— general state of man or of society;— position in society; status;— common occurrences; course daily events;— spirit; briskness; vivacity;— dissolution a quickening principle or power;— narrative of a person’s history; biography;— state of the blessed; eternal felicity Christ, the author and giver of life;— a term of endearment; darling;— pl. Lives, men; human beings souls, as in the phrase lives lost. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for life?

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