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Definitions of lift

  1. make off with belongings of others Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the component of the aerodynamic forces acting on an airfoil that opposes gravity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. fly people or goods to or from places not accessible by other means; "Food is airlifted into Bosnia" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. transportation of people or goods by air (especially when other means of access are unavailable) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. annul by recalling or rescinding; "He revoked the ban on smoking"; "lift an embargo"; "vacate a death sentence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. move upward; "The fog lifted"; "The smoke arose from the forest fire"; "The mist uprose from the meadows" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. raise from a lower to a higher position; "Raise your hands"; "Lift a load" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. raise in rank or condition; "The new law lifted many people from poverty" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the event of something being raised upward; "an elevation of the temperature in the afternoon"; "a raising of the land resulting from volcanic activity" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. lifting device consisting of a platform or cage that is raised and lowered mechanically in a vertical shaft in order to move people from one floor to another in a building Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. plastic surgery to remove wrinkles and other signs of aging from your face; an incision is made near the hair line and skin is pulled back and excess tissue is excised; "some actresses have more than one face lift" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. perform cosmetic surgery on someone's face Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. the act of raising something; "he responded with a lift of his eyebrow"; "fireman learn several different raises for getting ladders up" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. raise or haul up with or as if with mechanical help; "hoist the bicycle onto the roof of the car" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. rise up; "The building rose before them" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. the act of giving temporary assistance Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. a ride in a car; "he gave me a lift home" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. one of the layers forming the heel of a shoe or boot Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a device worn in a shoe or boot to make the wearer look taller or to correct a shortened leg Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. a powered conveyance that carries skiers up a hill Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. take without referencing from someone else's writing or speech; of intellectual property Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. invigorate or heighten; "lift my spirits"; "lift his ego" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. a wave that lifts the surface of the water or ground Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. remove from a surface; "the detective carefully lifted some fingerprints from the table" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. take off or away by decreasing; "lift the pressure" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. remove from a seedbed or from a nursery; "lift the tulip bulbs" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. remove (hair) by scalping Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. put an end to; "lift a ban"; "raise a siege" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. rise upward, as from pressure or moisture; "The floor is lifting slowly" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  30. call to stop the hunt or to retire, as of hunting dogs Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. make audible; "He lifted a war whoop" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. take (root crops) out of the ground; "lift potatoes" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. take hold of something and move it to a different location; "lift the box onto the table" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. move upwards; "lift one's eyes" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. take illegally; "rustle cattle" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. pay off (a mortgage) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. The sky; the atmosphere; the firmament. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To move in a direction opposite to that of gravitation; to raise; to elevate; to bring up from a lower place to a higher; to upheave; sometimes implying a continued support or holding in the higher place; -- said of material things; as, to lift the foot or the hand; to lift a chair or a burden. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To bear; to support. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To collect, as moneys due; to raise. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To steal; to carry off by theft (esp. cattle); as, to lift a drove of cattle. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To try to raise something; to exert the strength for raising or bearing. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. To rise; to become or appear raised or elevated; as, the fog lifts; the land lifts to a ship approaching it. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. To live by theft. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. Act of lifting; also, that which is lifted. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. The space or distance through which anything is lifted; as, a long lift. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. Help; assistance, as by lifting; as, to give one a lift in a wagon. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. That by means of which a person or thing lifts or is lifted Webster Dictionary DB
  49. A hoisting machine; an elevator; a dumb waiter. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. An exercising machine. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. A rise; a degree of elevation; as, the lift of a lock in canals. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. A lift gate. See Lift gate, below. Newage Dictionary DB
  53. One of the steps of a cone pulley. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. A layer of leather in the heel. Webster Dictionary DB
  55. That portion of the vibration of a balance during which the impulse is given. Webster Dictionary DB
  56. To raise, elevate, exalt, improve, in rank, condition, estimation, character, etc.; - often with up. Webster Dictionary DB
  57. A lift gate. See gate, below. Webster Dictionary DB
  58. A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below; - used for raising or supporting the end of the yard. Webster Dictionary DB
  59. To raise to a higher point; place in a higher position; to exalt. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  60. To exert strength in raising; to rise. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  61. The act of raising to a higher point; high position; as, the proud lift of her head; aid; help; assistance; as, to give anyone a lift in carrying a load; a machine for carrying up or down an elevator. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  62. To bring to a higher position: to elevate: to elate: to take and carry away. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  63. To try to raise. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  64. Act of lifting: that which is to be raised: that which assists to lift. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  65. Act of raising; contrivance for raising. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  66. To raise; exalt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  67. To raise; elevate; exalt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. To rise, or appear to rise, as mist. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. The act of lifting; that which is raised or hoisted. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  70. That which lifts or assists in lifting; an elevator, a hook for raising a window-sash, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  71. The act of lifting; that which is to be raised; assistance in lifting or otherwise; anything which lifts; a rise; a degree of elevation. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  72. To raise; to elevate; to exalt; to elate; to take and carry away. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  73. To try to raise. To lift up the eyes, to fix the eyes on; to direct the desires to God. To lift up the head, to raise from a low condition; to rejoice. To lift up the hand, to swear; to raise the hands in prayer; to rise in opposition to; to shake off sloth and engage in duty. To lift up the face, to look to with confidence, cheerfulness, and comfort. To lift up the heel against, to treat with insolence and contempt. To lift up the horn, to behave arrogantly or scornfully. To lift up the feet, to come speedily to one's relief. To lift up the voice, to call out either in grief or joy. See Loft. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  74. To raise from the ground; to elevate; to raise in dignity, intellect, or spirit; to strive to raise by strength. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  75. The act of lifting; assistance, as in lifting; that which is to be raised; anything that lifts. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  76. To raise; to take up. To "lift" a promissory note is to discharge its obligation by paying its amount or substituting another evidence of debt. To "lift the bar" of the statute of limitations, or of an estoppel. is to remove the obstruction which it interposes, by some sufficient act or acknowledgment thelawdictionary.org
  77. To raise, elevate, exalt, improve, in rank, condition, estimation, character, etc.; -- often with up. mso.anu.edu.au
  78. A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below; -- used for raising or supporting the end of the yard. mso.anu.edu.au
  79. To move in a direction opposite to that of gravitation; to raise; to elevate; to bring up from a lower place to a higher; to upheave; sometimes implying a continued support or holding in the higher place; said of material things; as, to lift the foot or the hand; to lift a chair or a burden. dictgcide_fs
  80. To raise, elevate, exalt, improve, in rank, condition, estimation, character, etc.; often with up. dictgcide_fs
  81. To steal; also, to live by theft. dictgcide_fs
  82. Help; assistance, as by lifting. dictgcide_fs
  83. A rope leading from the masthead to the extremity of a yard below; used for raising or supporting the end of the yard. dictgcide_fs
  84. A brightening of the spirits; encouragement; as, the campaign workers got a lift from the President's endorsement. dictgcide_fs
  85. lift, n. (Scot.) the air, heavens, sky. [A.S. lyft; Ger. luft, Ice. lopt, Goth. luftus, the air.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  86. lift, v.t. to bring to a higher position: to elevate or keep elevated: to elate: to take and carry away: (obs.) to bear, support: (slang) to arrest: to steal.--v.i. to rise: to try to rise.--n. act of lifting: that which is to be raised: that which assists to lift: a hoisting-machine: advancement.--adj. LIFT'ABLE.--ns. LIFT'ER, one who, or that which, lifts: (Shak.) a thief; LIFT'ING-BRIDGE, a drawbridge raised so as to allow ships to pass; LIFT'-PUMP, any pump which is not a force-pump.--LIFT THE HAND, to raise it in hostility; LIFT UP THE EYES, to look, direct one's eyes, or thoughts, to; LIFT UP THE FACE, to look upward, as in supplication; LIFT UP THE HAND, to make oath, swear: to pray; LIFT UP THE HEAD, to rejoice, exult; LIFT UP THE VOICE, to cry loudly.--DEAD LIFT (see DEAD). [Ice. lypta--lopt, the air.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  87. Raise to higher position, take up, hoist, (often up, off, out), elevate to higher plane of thought or feeling, give upward direction to (eyes, face), (l. up or l. one\'s hands or heart, in prayer &c.; l. one\'s hand, to take oath; never lifted a hand against one, struck him; l. up one\'s head, recover vigour after prostration, l. up another\'s head bibl., restore to liberty or dignity; l. up one\'s heel, kick; l. up one\'s horn, be ambitious or proud; l. up a cry, one\'s voice, cry out); hold or have on high (church lifts its spire); steal (esp. cattle), take (passage, information) in the way of plagiarism; remove (tents &c.); dig up (potatoes); hit (cricket-ball) into air; (of ship afloat) rise on wave; yield to a l. (window will not l.); (of cloud, fog, darkness) rise, disperse; (of floor) swell upwards, bulge. (N.) lifting (DEAD l.; give one a l., take him up into vehicle for part of way, also fig. give him helping hand); one layer of leather in boot-heel; apparatus for raising& lowering people or things to other floor of house, elevator, hoist; rise in the ground. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  88. n. Act of raising or lifting;— assistance in lifting, and hence assistance in general an elevator; a lifter;— a rise; a degree of elevation. Cabinet Dictionary

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