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Definitions of ring

  1. a toroidal shape; "a ring of ships in the harbor"; "a halo of smoke" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. jewelry consisting of a circular band of a precious metal worn on the finger; "she had rings on every finger" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. get or try to get into communication (with someone) by telephone; "I tried to call you all night"; "Take two aspirin and call me in the morning" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. be around; "Developments surround the town"; "The river encircles the village" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. (chemistry) a chain of atoms in a molecule that forms a closed loop Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. ring or echo with sound; "the hall resounded with laughter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an association of criminals; "police tried to break up the gang"; "a pack of thieves" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a rigid circular band of metal or wood or other material used for holding or fastening or hanging or pulling; "there was still a rusty iron hoop for tying a horse" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. make (bells) ring, often for the purposes of musical edification; "Ring the bells"; "My uncle rings every Sunday at the local church" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. make a ringing sound Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a square platform marked off by ropes in which contestants box or wrestle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a characteristic sound; "it has the ring of sincerity" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. the sound of a bell ringing; "the distinctive ring of the church bell"; "the ringing of the telephone"; "the tintinnabulation that so volumnously swells from the ringing and the dinging of the bells"--E. A. Poe Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a strip of material attached to the leg of a bird to identify it (as in studies of bird migration) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. jewelry consisting of a circlet of precious metal (often set with jewels) worn on the finger; "she had rings on every finger"; "he noted that she wore a wedding band" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. attach a ring to the foot of, in order to identify; "ring birds"; "band the geese to observe their migratory patterns" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. sound loudly and sonorously; "the bells rang" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. To cause to sound, especially by striking, as a metallic body; as, to ring a bell. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To make (a sound), as by ringing a bell; to sound. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body, particularly a metallic one. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To practice making music with bells. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To sound loud; to resound; to be filled with a ringing or reverberating sound. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To continue to sound or vibrate; to resound. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To be filled with report or talk; as, the whole town rings with his fame. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A sound; especially, the sound of vibrating metals; as, the ring of a bell. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Any loud sound; the sound of numerous voices; a sound continued, repeated, or reverberated. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A circle, or a circular line, or anything in the form of a circular line or hoop. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Specifically, a circular ornament of gold or other precious material worn on the finger, or attached to the ear, the nose, or some other part of the person; as, a wedding ring. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A circular area in which races are or run or other sports are performed; an arena. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. An inclosed space in which pugilists fight; hence, figuratively, prize fighting. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A circular group of persons. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. The plane figure included between the circumferences of two concentric circles. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. The solid generated by the revolution of a circle, or other figure, about an exterior straight line (as an axis) lying in the same plane as the circle or other figure. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. An instrument, formerly used for taking the sun's altitude, consisting of a brass ring suspended by a swivel, with a hole at one side through which a solar ray entering indicated the altitude on the graduated inner surface opposite. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. An elastic band partly or wholly encircling the spore cases of ferns. See Illust. of Sporangium. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A clique; an exclusive combination of persons for a selfish purpose, as to control the market, distribute offices, obtain contracts, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To surround with a ring, or as with a ring; to encircle. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To make a ring around by cutting away the bark; to girdle; as, to ring branches or roots. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To fit with a ring or with rings, as the fingers, or a swine's snout. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To rise in the air spirally. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. The sound made by a bell or by metals made to vibrate; a circle; a hoop or circular band; a small hoop of gold, etc., worn as an ornament, usually on the finger or attached to the ear; a space set off for contests or displays; as, a circus ring; a race course; a combination of men, usually for a selfish aim or purpose; as, a political ring. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. To sound, as a bell when struck; to sound loudly and clearly; as, his voice rang out; resound; as, the woods ring with song; to cause a bell to sound; as, to ring for a maid; to be filled with report or talk; as, the whole town rings with his fame. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  45. To cause to sound, as metal when struck; to produce (a sound), as by striking a bell; as, ring the alarm; proclaim aloud or abroad; as, ring in the year; to put a ring around; encircle; to fit or decorate with a ring. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  46. Rang. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. Rung. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  48. Ringing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  49. 1. A circular band surrounding a wide central opening. 2. In anatomy, annulus, any approximately circular structure surrounding an opening or a level area. 3. The chain of atoms in a closed-chain compound. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  50. A continuous substance inclosing a plane circular space, as femoral ring. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  51. A circle: a small hoop, usually of metal, worn on the finger as an ornament: a circular area for races, etc.: a circular group of persons: a clique or combination for selfish purposes in politics: the prize ring, the occupation of the pugilist. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  52. To encircle: to fit with a ring. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  53. To sound as a bell when struck: to tinkle: to practice the art of ringing bells: to continue to sound: to be filled with report. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  54. To cause to sound, as a metal: to produce by ringing:-pa.t. rang, rung; pa.p. rung. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  55. A sound, esp. of metals: the sound of many voices: a chime of many bells. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  56. A circle; hoop; circular figure or group; ares. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  57. Rang, rung. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  58. Sound, as of a bell. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  59. To cause to sound, as a bell. &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  60. To sound, as a bell; be filled with sound. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  61. To encircle; supply with rings. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. To sound, as a bell; announce or proclaim, as by sounding bells. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. A circular band, as of gold for the finger. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. A circular area or arena. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  65. A group of tthings or persons in a circle; combination of persons, as in politics. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. The sound of, or as of, a bell. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. A circle, or anything in the form of a circular line or hoop; a circular course or area; a group round; a combination for private ends; the pugilistic class. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  68. A sound, particularly the sound of metals; any loud sound, or sound continued, repeated, or reverberated; a chime or set of bells harmonically tuned. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  69. To encircle; to fit with a ring or rings. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  70. To cause to sound, particularly by striking a metallic body; to sound aloud. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  71. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body; to practise the art of ringing bells; to tinkle; to be filled with talk. To ring the changes upon, to use in various senses. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  72. Anything in the form of a circle; a small hoop of gold, variously ornamented, worn as on the finger; a hoop; a circular course; the betting arena on a race-course. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  73. To encircle; to fit or arm with a ring; to cut a ring of bark out of a tree. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  74. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body; to cause to sound; to tinkle; to be spread abroad, as, the whole town rang with the news. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  75. The sound as of a bell or a metallic body; the loud repeated sounds, as of voices in acclamation; a peal or chime of bells. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  76. The ring was regarded as an indispensable article of a Hebrews attire, inasmuch as it contained his signet. It was hence the symbol of authority. ( Genesis 41:42 ; Esther 3:10 ) Rings were worn not only by men, but by women. ( Isaiah 3:21 ) We may conclude from ( Exodus 28:11 ) that the rings contained a stone engraven with a device or with the owners name. The custom appears also to have prevailed among the Jews of the apostolic age. ( James 2:2 ) biblestudytools.com
  77. Used as an ornament to decorate the fingers, arms, wrists, and also the ears and the nose. Rings were used as a signet ( Genesis 38:18 ). They were given as a token of investment with authority ( Genesis 41:42 ; Esther 3:8-10 ; 8:2 ), and of favour and dignity ( Luke 15:22 ). They were generally worn by rich men ( James 2:2 ). They are mentioned by Isiah ( 3:21 ) among the adornments of Hebrew women. biblestudytools.com
  78. ring, n. a circle: a small hoop, usually of metal, worn on the finger or in the ear as an ornament: a circular area for races, &c.: a circular course, a revolution: a clique organised to control the market: an arena or prize-ring: the commercial measure of staves for casks: (archit.) a cincture round a column: (anat.) an annulus: a group or combination of persons.--v.t. to encircle: to fit with a ring: to surround: to wed with a ring: (hort.) to cut out a ring of bark from a tree.--v.i. to move in rings.--ns. RING'-AR'MATURE, an armature in which the coils of wire are wound round a ring; RING'-ARM'OUR, armour made of metal rings (see CHAIN-MAIL).--v.t. RING'-BARK, to strip a ring of bark round a tree to kill it.--ns. RING'BILL, the ring-necked duck; RING'-BOLT, an iron bolt with a ring through a hole at one end; RING'BONE, in farriery, a bony callus on a horse's pastern-bone, the result of inflammation: the condition caused by this; RING'-BUNT'ING, the reed-bunting; RING'-CARR'IER, a go-between; RING'-D[=I]'AL, a portable sun-dial; RING'-DOG, an iron apparatus for hauling timber; RING'-DOTT'EREL, the ringed plover; RING'DOVE, the cushat or wood-pigeon, so called from a white ring or line on the neck; RING'-DROP'PING, a trick practised by rogues upon simple people.--adj. RINGED, surrounded as with a ring, annulose, annulate: wearing a wedding-ring.--ns. RINGED'-CAR'PET, a British geometrid moth; RING'-FENCE, a fence continuously encircling an estate, a limit; RING'-FING'ER, the third finger of the left hand, on which women wear their marriage-ring.--adj. RING'-FORMED, annular.--ns. RING'-FRAME, any one of a class of spinning-machines with vertical spindles; RING'-GAUGE, a measure consisting of a ring of fixed size used for measuring spherical objects; RING'LEADER, the head of a riotous body: one who opens a ball; RING'LET, a little ring: a curl, esp. of hair.--adj. RING'LETED.--ns. RING'LOCK, a puzzle-lock; RING'-MAIL, chain-armour; RING'MAN, the third finger of the hand: one interested in the prize-ring; RING'-MAS'TER, one who has charge of a circus-ring and the performances in it; RING'-MON'EY, rudely formed rings anciently used for money; RING'-NECK, a kind of ring-plover: the ring-necked duck; RING'-NET, a net for catching butterflies; RING'-OU'SEL, a species of thrush, with a white band on the breast; RING'-PARR'OT, a common Indian parrot; RING'-PERCH, the perch of North America; RING'-PLOV'ER, a ring-necked plover; RING'-ROPE, a rope for hauling the cable in rough weather; RING'-SAW, a scroll-saw with annular web; RING'-SMALL, broken stones of such a size as to pass through a ring two inches in diameter; RING'-SNAKE, the collared snake, a harmless serpent of the United States; RING'STER, a member of a ring; RING'-STOP'PER, a piece of rope by which the ring of an anchor is secured to the cat-head.--adjs. RING'-STRAKED (B.), -STREAKED, streaked with rings.--n. RING'-TAIL (naut.), a studding-sail set upon the gaff of a fore-and-aft sail: a light sail set abaft and beyond the spanker: the female of the hen-harrier, named from a rust-coloured ring formed by the tips of the tail-feathers when expanded.--adj. RING'-TAILED, having the tail marked with bars or rings of colour, as a lemur: having a tail curled at the end.--ns. RING'-THRUSH, the ring-ousel; RING'-TIME (Shak.), time for marrying; RING'-VALVE, a hollow cylindrical valve; RING'-WORK, a material composed of rings interlinked; RING'WORM, a skin disease in which itchy pimples appear in rings.--RING THE CHANGES (see CHANGE).--RIDE, or TILT, AT THE RING, to practise the sport of riding rapidly, spear in hand, and carrying off with it a ring hung up; THE RING, pugilism and the persons connected with it. [A.S. hring; Ice. hring-r, Ger., Dan., and Sw. ring.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  79. ring, v.i. to sound as a bell when struck: to tinkle: to practise the art of ringing bells: to continue to sound: to be filled with report: to resound: to echo.--v.t. to cause to sound, as a metal: to produce by ringing:--pa.t. rang, rung; pa.p. rung.--n. a sound, esp. of metals: the sound of many voices: a chime of many bells.--ns. RING'ER; RING'ING, the act of causing to sound, as music-bells: resounding.--adv. RING'INGLY.--RING BACKWARD, to change the order of ringing; RING DOWN, to conclude; RING IN (theat.), to signal the conductor to begin; RINGING OF THE EARS, a sound in the ears; RING UP, to rouse by the ringing of a bell. [A.S. hringan; cog. with Ice. hringja, to ring bells, hringla, to clink, Dan. ringle, to tinkle.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  80. A name given to natural, circular, or roundish apertures, with muscular or aponeurotic parietes, which serve for the passage of some vessel or canal: - as the umbilical ring, inguinal ring, etc. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  81. Circlet usu. of precious metal& often set with gem (s) worn round finger as ornament or token (esp. of betrothal or marriage) or signet, or (usu. nose, arm, &c., -r.) hung to or encircling other part of body; circular appliance of any material& any (but esp., cf. hoop, no great) size; raised or sunk or otherwise distinguishable line or band round, rim of, cylindrical or circular object; circular fold, coil, bend, structure, part, or mark (rr. of tree, concentric bands of wood corresponding in number to tree\'s years; has livid rr. round his eyes; puffing out rr. of smoke; rr. in water, circular ripples expanding from centre of agitation); persons, trees, &c., disposed in a circle, such disposition, (Commerc. &c.) combination of traders or politicians acting together for control of market or policy; circular enclosure or space for circus-riding, prize-fighting (PRIZE-r.), betting at races (the r., bookmakers), showing of cattle, &c.; circular or spiral course (make rr. round, go or do things incomparably quicker than); r.-bark v.t., cut r. in bark of (tree) to kill it or to check its growth& bring it into bearing; r.-bolt, bolt with r. attached for fastening rope to &c.; r.-bone, (horse-disease with) deposit of bony matter on pastern-bones; r.-cartilage, CRICOID; r.-dove, wood-pigeon; r.-fence, completely enclosing estate &c.; r.-finger, third esp. of left hand; r.-goal, game in which light hoop is thrown towards goal with sticks; r.-hunt, in which beasts are driven inwards by r. of fire; ringleader, (one of) chief instigator (s) in mutiny, riot, &c.; r.-lock, opened by right adjustment of several grooved rr.; r.-man, bookmaker; r.-master, manager of circus performance; r.-neck, r.-necked plover or duck; r.-necked, with band (s) of colour round neck; r.-net, kind of salmon net, also of lace; r.-ouzel, kind of bird allied to blackbird; r.-snake, common European grass-snake (from coiling); r.-stand, for keeping finger-rr. on; r.-straked (bibl.), marked with rr. of colour round body; r.-tail, female of henharrier, also golden eagle till its third year, also r.-tailed opossum or phalanger; r.-tailed, with tail ringed in alternate colours, also (of phalanger) with tail curled at end; r.-taw, game with marbles in r.; r.-wall, as r.-fence; ringworm, skin-disease esp. of children in circular patches; hence (-)ringed, ringless, aa. (Vb): (of hawk &c.) rise in spirals; (of hunted fox) take circular course; encompass (usu. round, about, in; often in p.p.), hem in (game, cattle) by riding or beating in circle round them; put r. upon, put r. in nose of (pig, bull), (r.-the-bull, game with r. to be thrown or swung on to hook); =r.-bark above; cut (onions, apples) into rr. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  82. (rang, now rarely rung; rung), & n. Give forth clear resonant sound (as) of vibrating metal (bell, trumpet, coin, sound, rings, often out, &c.; with a ringing laugh; a shot rang out; a ringing frost, in which ground rings under foot; r. true, false, of coin tested by throwing on counter, & fig. of sentiments &c.), (of bell) r. to or for prayers, dinner, &c., convey summons by ringing; (of place) resound, re-echo, (with sound, to sound or its cause, with fame &c. or its theme, with talk of; often again); (of utterance or other sound) r. in one\'s ears, heart, &c., linger in one\'s hearing, haunt the memory; (of ears) be filled with sensation as of bell-ringing (so has a ringing in the ears) or with sound; make (bell) r. (r. the bell, esp. as summons to servant; r. up bell, raise church bell over beam& r. it there; ringing engine, pile-driver worked by ropes like peal of bells), throw (coin) on counter to test it; r. bell as summons (r. at door, to get admittance &c.; r. for servant, coffee, one\'s boots, &c.; did you r., sir?); sound (peal, knell, BOB-major, the CHANGES) on bells (or with bell or bells as subj.; r. the knell of, announce or herald abolition &c. of); announce (hour &c.) by sound of bell (s); summon up &c. by ringing bell (r. up on telephone, get or seek communication with; r. off, terminate telephone interview; r. curtain up or down in theatre, direct it by bell to be raised or lowered); usher in, out, with bell-ringing. (N.) set of (church) bells; ringing sound, ringing tone in voice &c., resonance of coin or vessel; act of ringing bell, sound so produced, (three rr. for the hall-porter; give bell a r.; heard a loud r. at the door). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  83. A circular band or hoop; a structure surrounding a circular opening. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  84. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A circle or circular line, or any thing in the form of a circular line or hoop;— a circle of gold or other substance worn as an ornament;— a circle of iron or other metal to which things are attached, or by which a hold for a purchase is obtained;—a circle of persons formed for a dance or other sports; also, the area within the circle for wrestling, boxing, &c.; hence, the ring, pugilism; prize-fighting. Cabinet Dictionary
  85. V.t. To surround with a ring or as with a ring; to encircle;- to out out a ring of, as bark. To cause to sound, especially by striking, as a metallic body;- to produce by ringing, as a sound or peal;— to repeat often, loudly, or earnestly;— v.i. To sound, as a bell or other sonorous body;— to chime;— to resound; to continue to sound or vibrate; to tinkle;— to be filled with report or talk;- imp. rang or rung: pp. rung: ppr. ringing. Cabinet Dictionary
  86. n. A sound; especially, the sound of metals;— any loud sound or sound continued, repeated, or reverberated;- a chime or set of bells harmonically tuned. Cabinet Dictionary

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