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Definitions of lock

  1. a strand or cluster of hair Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. keep engaged; "engaged the gears" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a restraint incorporated into the ignition switch to prevent the use of a vehicle by persons who do not have the key Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. hold in a locking position; "He locked his hands around her neck" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. become engaged or intermeshed with one another; "They were locked in embrace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. pass by means through a lock in a waterway Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. any wrestling hold in which some part of the opponent's body is twisted or pressured Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a fastener fitted to a door or drawer to keep it firmly closed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. enclosure consisting of a section of canal that can be closed to control the water level; used to raise or lower vessels that pass through it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a mechanism that detonates the charge of a gun Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. become rigid or immoveable; of bones; "Don't lock your knees in this exercise" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. place in a place where something cannot be removed or someone cannot escape; "The parents locked her daughter up for the weekend"; "She locked her jewels in the safe" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. fasten with a lock; "lock the bike to the fence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. build locks in order to facilitate the navigation of vessels Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. become rigid or immoveable; "The therapist noticed that the patient's knees tended to lock in this exercise" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. hold fast (in a certain state); "He was locked in a laughing fit" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. A grapple in wrestling. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A tuft of hair; a flock or small quantity of wool, hay, or other like substance; a tress or ringlet of hair. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Anything that fastens; specifically, a fastening, as for a door, a lid, a trunk, a drawer, and the like, in which a bolt is moved by a key so as to hold or to release the thing fastened. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A fastening together or interlacing; a closing of one thing upon another; a state of being fixed or immovable. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A place from which egress is prevented, as by a lock. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The barrier or works which confine the water of a stream or canal. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. That part or apparatus of a firearm by which the charge is exploded; as, a matchlock, flintlock, percussion lock, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A device for keeping a wheel from turning. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To fasten with a lock, or as with a lock; to make fast; to prevent free movement of; as, to lock a door, a carriage wheel, a river, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To fasten in or out, or to make secure by means of, or as with, locks; to confine, or to shut in or out -- often with up; as, to lock one's self in a room; to lock up the prisoners; to lock up one's silver; to lock intruders out of the house; to lock money into a vault; to lock a child in one's arms; to lock a secret in one's breast. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To link together; to clasp closely; as, to lock arms. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To furnish with locks; also, to raise or lower (a boat) in a lock. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To seize, as the sword arm of an antagonist, by turning the left arm around it, to disarm him. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To become fast, as by means of a lock or by interlacing; as, the door locks close. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. An inclosure in a canal with gates at each end, used in raising or lowering boats as they pass from one level to another; - called also lift lock. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To prevent ingress or access to, or exit from, by fastening the lock or locks of; - often with up; as, to lock or lock up, a house, jail, room, trunk. etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A mechanical device furnished with a spring and bolt for fastening a door, etc., by means of a key; anything that fastens; an inclosure between gates in a canal, river, etc., used in raising or lowering boats as they pass from level to level; a mechanism for firing a gun; a tuft of hair or wool; ringlet. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. To fasten or secure with a lock; shut up; confine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. To become fast by a lock; entwine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. An instrument to fasten doors, etc.: an inclosure in a canal for raising or lowering boats: the part of a firearm by which it is discharged: a grapple in wrestling: a state of being immovable: any narrow confined place. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. To fasten with a lock: to fasten so as to impede motion: to shut up: to close fast: to embrace closely: to furnish with locks. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To become fast: to unite closely. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. A tuft or ringlet of hair: a flock of wool, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. Fastening for a door, &c.; inclosed space in a canal; contrivance for discharging a gun; tuft of hair. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To fasten with a lock; clasp closely. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To make fast; shut in or out securely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. To be securely closed; be held fast. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A device to fasten doors, drawers, etc., by means of a key. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A spring mechanism for discharging a firearm. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. An enclosure in a canal, with floodgates, to control the water level. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A tuft, as of hair. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Anything that fastens; an instrument to fasten doors, &c.; an enclosure or lock-up; the part of a fire-arm by which it is discharged; an inclosure in a canal, with gates at each end, for raising or lowering the boats; a state of being locked; a grapple in wrestling. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. A tuft of hair; a tuft of wool, hay, or other like substance; a ringlet of hair. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. To fasten with a lock; to fasten, so as to impede motion; to shut up or confine; to close fast; to embrace closely; to provide with locks; to seize the sword-arm of an antagonist by a peculiar movement. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. A machine for fastening doors, &c., by means of a key; the part of a gun or rifle by which it is discharged; the part of a canal confined by gates; any narrow confined place or enclosure. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  52. To fasten with a lock; to shut up or confine; to close fast; to embrace closely; to become fast. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  53. A tuft of hair; a small bunch or tuft of wool; ringlets or straggling tufts of hair around the forehead. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. Where European locks have not been introduced, the locks of eastern houses are usually of wood, and consist of a partly hollow bolt from fourteen inches to two feet long for external doors or gates, or from seven to nine inches for interior doors. The bold passes through a groove in a piece attached to the door into a socket in the door-post. biblestudytools.com
  55. An inclosure in a canal with gates at each end, used in raising or lowering boats as they pass from one level to another; -- called also lift lock. mso.anu.edu.au
  56. To prevent ingress or access to, or exit from, by fastening the lock or locks of; -- often with up; as, to lock or lock up, a house, jail, room, trunk. etc. mso.anu.edu.au
  57. The Hebrews usually secured their doors by bars of wood or iron ( Isaiah 45:2 ; 1 Kings 4:3 ). These were the locks originally used, and were opened and shut by large keys applied through an opening in the outside ( Judges 3:24 ). (See KEY .) Lock of hair ( Judges 16:13 Judges 16:19 ; Ezekiel 8:3 ; Numbers 6:5 , etc.). biblestudytools.com
  58. An inclosure in a canal with gates at each end, used in raising or lowering boats as they pass from one level to another; called also lift lock. dictgcide_fs
  59. To prevent ingress or access to, or exit from, by fastening the lock or locks of; often with up; as, to lock or lock up, a house, jail, room, trunk. etc. dictgcide_fs
  60. To fasten in or out, or to make secure by means of, or as with, locks; to confine, or to shut in or out often with up; as, to lock one's self in a room; to lock up the prisoners; to lock up one's silver; to lock intruders out of the house; to lock money into a vault; to lock a child in one's arms; to lock a secret in one's breast. dictgcide_fs
  61. lok, n. a device to fasten doors, &c.: an enclosure in a canal for raising or lowering boats: the part of a firearm by which it is discharged: a grapple in wrestling: a state of being immovable: any narrow, confined place.--v.t. to fasten with a lock: to fasten so as to impede motion: to shut up: to close fast: to embrace closely: to furnish with locks.--v.i. to become fast: to unite closely.--ns. LOCK'AGE, the locks of a canal: the difference in their levels, the materials used for them, and the tolls paid for passing through them; LOCK'-CHAIN, a chain for fastening the wheels of a vehicle by tying the rims to some part which does not rotate; LOCK'ER, any closed place that may be locked; LOCK'ET, a little ornamental case of gold or silver, usually containing a miniature.--adj. LOCK'FAST, firmly fastened by locks.--ns. LOCK'GATE, a gate for opening or closing a lock in a canal or river; LOCK'-HOS'PITAL (see HOSPITAL); LOCK'HOUSE, the lock-keeper's house; LOCK'-JAW, LOCKED'-JAW, a contraction of the muscles of the jaw by which its motion is suspended; LOCK'-KEEP'ER, one who keeps or attends the locks of a canal; LOCK'OUT, the act of locking out, esp. used of the locking out of a teacher by the pupils or vice versâ, or of the refusal of an employer to admit his workmen within the works as a means of coercion; LOCKS'MAN, a turnkey; LOCK'SMITH, a smith who makes and mends locks; LOCK'STITCH, a stitch formed by the locking of two threads together; LOCK'UP, a place for locking up or confining persons for a short time.--NOT A SHOT IN THE LOCKER (naut.), not a penny in the pocket. [A.S. loca, a lock; Ice. loka, a bolt, Ger. loch, a dungeon.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  62. lok, n. a tuft or ringlet of hair: a small quantity, as of hay: (Scots law) a quantity of meal, the perquisite of a mill-servant: (Shak.) a love-lock--n. LOCK'MAN, an officer in the Isle of Man who acts as a kind of under-sheriff to the governor. [A.S. locc; Ice. lokkr, Ger. locke, a lock.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  63. Portion of hair that hangs together, tress, (pl.) hair of head; tuft of wool or cotton. Hence-locked a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  64. n. appliance for fastening door, lid, &c., with bolt that requires key of particular shape to work it (under l. & key, locked up); appliance to keep wheel from revolving or slewing; mechanism for exploding charge of gun (l., stock, & barrel, whole of thing, completely); confined section of canal at point where level changes for raising& lowering boats by use of sluiced gates; ante-chamber to chamber in which engineering work is done in compressed air; interlocking, e.g. block or jam of carriages in street; extent to which fore-wheel\'s can be made to cross hind-wheel\'s plane; (also L.-Hospital) hospital for venereal disease; lockfast, secured with l.; lockman, coroner\'s summoner in I. of Man; locksman, keeper of canal l.; locksmith, maker& mender of ll. Hence lockless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  65. Fasten (door, box, &c.) with l., shut up (house &c.) by fastening doors thus, (of door &c.) admit of being so fastened, have a l.; shut (person, thing) up, in, or into; (of land, hills, &c.) hem in (usu. in pass.); (fig.) store (up or away) inaccessibly (facts locked up in hieroglyphics; capital locked up in land), imprison (senses locked in sleep); keep (person) out by locking door (esp. of employer coercing workmen by refusing them work; l.-out n., this procedure, of. STRIKE); bring or come into rigidly fixed position, engage, (make) catch, fasten by interlacing or fitting of corresponding parts, entangle, (p.p.) joined in hostile embrace; (mil., of rear rank) march so close to front rank that feet overlap; (of vehicle or wheels) (have forewheels that) admit of being slewed into different planes from those of hind-wheels; provide (river, canal) with ll., convey (boat) up or down through l., go through l.; l.-chain. for locking wheels of vehicle; l.-jaw, locked-jaw, (pop. name for) trismus, variety of tetanus, tonic spasm of muscles of mastication causing jaws to remain rigidly closed; l.-nut, extra nut screwed over another to prevent its starting; l.-spring, closing watch-case; l.-stitch, sewing-machine stitch by which two threads are firmly locked together; l.-up, (time of) locking up school &c. for night, unrealizable state of invested capital or amount of capital locked up, house or room for temporary detention of prisoners, (attrib.) that can be locked up (l.-up coach-house). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  66. l. the stable door after the horse has been stolen, take precautions too late. Concise Oxford Dictionary

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