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Definitions of perfect

  1. without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers; "an arrant fool"; "a complete coward"; "a consummate fool"; "a double-dyed villain"; "gross negligence"; "a perfect idiot"; "pure folly"; "what a sodding mess"; "stark staring mad"; "a thoroughgoing villain"; "utter nonsense" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. make perfect; bring to perfection Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. make perfect or complete; "perfect your French in Paris!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a tense of verbs used in describing action that has been completed (sometimes regarded as perfective aspect) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. precisely accurate or exact; "perfect timing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. being complete of its kind and without defect or blemish; "a perfect circle"; "a perfect reproduction"; "perfect happiness"; "perfect manners"; "a perfect specimen"; "a perfect day" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. Perfectly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. Brought to consummation or completeness; completed; not defective nor redundant; having all the properties or qualities requisite to its nature and kind; without flaw, fault, or blemish; without error; mature; whole; pure; sound; right; correct. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Well informed; certain; sure. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The perfect tense, or a form in that tense. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To make perfect; to finish or complete, so as to leave nothing wanting; to give to anything all that is requisite to its nature and kind. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Hermaphrodite; having both stamens and pistils; - said of flower. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Complete; without defect; pure: possessing every moral excellence; fully skilled; as, a perfect workman; in grammar, denoting a tense that expresses completed action. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. To make so as to be without fault or lack; complete. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. Perfecter, perfectness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Perfectibility. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Done thoroughly or completely: completed: not defective: unblemished: possessing every moral excellence: completely skilled or acquainted: (gram.) expressing an act completed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To make perfect or complete: to finish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. PERFECTER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. Complete; finished; having every excellence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. Perfection. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To make perfect; complete. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To make perfect; finish; complete. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. Perfectible. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Perfective. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Without defect or lack; complete. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Noting past or finished action. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. The perfect tense. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. Complete in all its parts; completely skilled; complete morally; faultless. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To instruct fully; to finish; to complete. Perfect tense, the tense that expresses completed action. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. Complete throughout; not defective or blemished; having all that is requisite to its nature and kind; completely skilled or informed; not liable to err; pure; blameless; in gram., applied to the tense of a verb which signifies an action done in past time, but connected by its continuance or effects with the present. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To complete; to finish thoroughly; to raise to a perfect state; to instruct fully; to make wholly skilful. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Hermaphrodite; having both stamens and pistils; -- said of flower. mso.anu.edu.au
  34. Complete; finished; executed ; enforceable. thelawdictionary.org
  35. p[.e]r'fekt, adj. done thoroughly or completely: completed: without blemish, fault, or error: having neither too much nor too little: entire, very great: in the highest degree: possessing every moral excellence: completely skilled or acquainted: (gram.) expressing an act completed: (bot.) having both stamens and pistils, hermaphrodite.--v.t. (or per-fekt') to make perfect: to finish: to teach fully, to make fully skilled in anything.--ns. PERFECT[=A]'TION (rare); PER'FECTER; PERFECT'I, a body of Catharists in the 12th and 13th centuries, of very strict lives; PERFECTIBIL'ITY, quality of being made perfect.--adj. PERFECT'IBLE, that may be made perfect.--ns. PERFEC'TION, state of being perfect: a perfect quality or acquirement: the highest state or degree; PERFEC'TIONISM (or PERFECTIBIL'ITY), the belief that man in a state of grace may attain to a relative perfection or a state of living without sin in this life; PERFEC'TIONIST, one who pretends to be perfect: one who thinks that moral perfection can be attained in this life: one of the Bible Communists or Free-lovers, a small American sect founded by J. H. Noyes (1811-86), which settled at Oneida in 1848, holding that the gospel if accepted secures freedom from sin.--adj. PERFECT'IVE, tending to make perfect.--advs. PERFECT'IVELY, PER'FECTLY, in a perfect manner: completely: exactly: without fault.--n. PER'FECTNESS, state or quality of being perfect: completeness: perfection: consummate excellence.--PERFECT INSECT, the imago or completely developed form of an insect; PERFECT METALS (see METAL); PERFECT NUMBER, a number equal to the sum of all its divisors, the number itself of course excepted, as 6 = 1 + 2 + 3, 28 = 1 + 2 + 4 + 7 + 14. [Fr.,--L. perfectus, pa.p. of perfic[)e]re--per, thoroughly, fac[)e]re, to do.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Complete, not deficient; faultless; (of lesson) thoroughly learned; thoroughly trained or skilled (in duties &c.); exact, precise, as a p. square, circle; entire, unqualified, as a p. stranger, p. nonsense; (Gram., of tense) denoting completed event or action viewed in relation to the present, future p., giving sense will have done; (Bot.) having all four whorls of the flower. Hence perfectly adv., perfectness n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. Complete, carry through; make perfect; improve. Hence perfectibility n., perfectible a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. n. A tense partly of past and partly of present time—it notes an action done in past time, but connected with the present by its effects or consequences. Cabinet Dictionary

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