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Definitions of pitch

  1. an all-fours game in which the first card led is a trump Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. heel over; "The tower is tilting"; "The ceiling is slanting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. move sideways or in an unsteady way, as of a ship or a vehicle out of control Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. (baseball) the throwing of a baseball by a pitcher to a batter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. throw or toss with a light motion; "flip me the beachball"; "toss me newspaper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. set the level or character of; "She pitched her speech to the teenagers in the audience" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. sell or offer for sale from place to place Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. be at an angle; "The terrain sloped down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the action or manner of throwing something; "his pitch fell short and his hat landed on the floor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a high approach shot in golf Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the property of sound that varies with variation in the frequency of vibration Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. degree of deviation from a horizontal plane; "the roof had a steep pitch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. promotion by means of an argument and demonstration Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. (British) a vendor's position (especially on the sidewalk); "he was employed to see that his paper's news pitches were not trespassed upon by rival vendors" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. set to a certain pitch, as of an instrument or one's voice; "He pitched his voice very low" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. any of various dark heavy viscid substances obtained as a residue Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. a vendor's position (especially on the sidewalk); "he was employed to see that his paper's news pitches were not trespassed upon by rival vendors" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. set to a certain pitch; "He pitched his voice very low" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. lead (a card) and establish the trump suit Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. hit (a golf ball) in a high arc with a backspin Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. throw or hurl from the mound to the batter, as in baseball; "The pitcher delivered the ball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. erect and fasten; "pitch a tent" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. fall or plunge forward; "She pitched over the railing of the balcony" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. The distance between symmetrically arranged or corresponding parts of an armature, measured along a line, called the pitch line, drawn around its length. Sometimes half of this distance is called the pitch. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A thick, black, lustrous, and sticky substance obtained by boiling down tar. It is used in calking the seams of ships; also in coating rope, canvas, wood, ironwork, etc., to preserve them. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. See Pitchstone. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. To cover over or smear with pitch. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Fig.: To darken; to blacken; to obscure. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To throw, generally with a definite aim or purpose; to cast; to hurl; to toss; as, to pitch quoits; to pitch hay; to pitch a ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To thrust or plant in the ground, as stakes or poles; hence, to fix firmly, as by means of poles; to establish; to arrange; as, to pitch a tent; to pitch a camp. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To fix or set the tone of; as, to pitch a tune. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To set or fix, as a price or value. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To plunge or fall; esp., to fall forward; to decline or slope; as, to pitch from a precipice; the vessel pitches in a heavy sea; the field pitches toward the east. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand; as, a good pitch in quoits. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Height; stature. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. A descent; a fall; a thrusting down. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant; as, a steep pitch in the road; the pitch of a roof. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. The relative acuteness or gravity of a tone, determined by the number of vibrations which produce it; the place of any tone upon a scale of high and low. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. The length, measured along the axis, of a complete turn of the thread of a screw, or of the helical lines of the blades of a screw propeller. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. The distance between the centers of holes, as of rivet holes in boiler plates. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. To settle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. To fix one's choise; - with on or upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. The distance from center to center of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; - called also circular pitch. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. The solid black sticky substance obtained from boiled tar; a plunging forward or down; as, a headlong pitch from a rock; tossing motion, as of a ship in a storm; degree or rate; as, the highest pitch of excitement; slope; as, the pitch of a roof; the degree of a musical note, or the tone of a voice; distance between the centers of two gear teeth; the act or manner of throwing or tossing; a cast. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  52. To smear with boiled tar; throw or fling; cast headlong; set to a keynote; to fit, or set in order; fix in or on the ground; as, to pitch a tent. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  53. To settle; fall headlong; as, to pitch forward; encamp; rise and fall, as a ship; fix the choice: with upon. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  54. A resinous substance obtained from tar after the volatile substances have been expelled by boiling. See pix. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  55. The solid black shining substance obtained by boiling down common tar. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  56. To smear with pitch. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  57. To pick or strike with a pike: to throw: to fix or set in array: to fix the tone. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  58. To settle, as something pitched: to come to rest from flight: to fall headlong: to fix the choice: to encamp: to rise and fall, as a ship. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  59. Any point or degree of elevation or depression: degree: degree of slope: a descent: (mus.) the height of a note: (mech.) distance between the centres of two teeth. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  60. Black, sticky resin. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  61. Degree of elevation; descent. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  62. To settle; fix; fall headlong; rise and fall. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  63. To smear or fill with pitch. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  64. To threw; toss; fix; fix the tone. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  65. To toss; throw. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. To fix or arrange, as a tent. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. To set the pitch of. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. To throw; fall or plunge downward. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. To rise and fall alternately at the bow and stern, as a ship. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  70. To cover or treat with pitch. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  71. Point or degree of elevation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  72. The degree of descent; slope, as of a roof. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  73. The highness or lowness of a tone. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  74. A toss; throw. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  75. A thick, sticky substance obtained from tar or turpentine; the resinous sap of pines. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  76. A thick black substance obtained by boiling down tar. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  77. Any point or degree of elevation; highest rise; size; stature; degree; rate; descent; slope; elevation of the key-note of a tune. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  78. To smear or pay over with pitch. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  79. To throw or thrust, primarily with a long pointed object; to fix; to plant; to throw at a point; to throw headlong; to throw with a fork; to set the key-note of a tune in music. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  80. To settle; to fall headlong; to plunge; to fall; to encamp; to rise and fall, as the head and stern of a ship. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  81. The thick black substance obtained by boiling down common tar; the resinous juice of the pine or fir-tree. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  82. To smear or cover with pitch; to blacken; to obscure. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  83. Any degree of elevation or slope; slope or declivity, as of a hill or roof; a fall or throw; a throw at a point; a casting forward or down; the degree of acuteness or graveness of a sound, generally musical; degree; position; in mech., the distance between centres, as between two adjacent teeth of gearing. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  84. To fling or throw; to plant or set, as a camp or tent; to throw, as at a point; to cast forward; to ascertain by trial the key-note of a piece of music; to fix choice; to rise and fall, as a boat or ship on the water; to come to rest from flight; to plunge or fall headlong. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  85. The three Hebrew words so translated all represent the same object, viz., mineral pitch or asphalt in its different aspects. Asphalt is an opaque, inflammable substance which bubbles up from subterranean fountains in a liquid state, and hardens by exposure to the air, but readily melts under the influence of heat. In the latter state it is very tenacious, and was used as a cement in lieu of mortar in Babylonia ( ( Genesis 11:3 ) as well as for coating the outside of vessels, ( Genesis 6:14 ) and particularly for making the papyrus boats of the Egyptians water-tight. ( Exodus 2:3 ) The jews and Arabians got their supply in large quantities from the Dead Sea, which hence received its classical name of Lacus Asphaltites . biblestudytools.com
  86. To fix one's choise; -- with on or upon. mso.anu.edu.au
  87. The distance from center to center of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; -- called also circular pitch. mso.anu.edu.au
  88. In chemistry, pitch is another term used for asphalt. In mechanices, pitch is the distance between two adjacent openings of a gear. In the travel industry, pitch is the empty space situated between two empty seats, usaually for the legs. thelawdictionary.org
  89. ( Genesis 6:14 ), asphalt or bitumen in its soft state, called "slime" ( Genesis 11:3 ; 14:10 ; Exodus 2:3 ), found in pits near the Dead Sea (q.v.). It was used for various purposes, as the coating of the outside of vessels and in building. Allusion is made in Isaiah 34:9 to its inflammable character. (See SLIME .) biblestudytools.com
  90. pich, n. the solid black shining substance obtained by boiling down common tar.--v.t. to smear with pitch.--adjs. PITCH'-BLACK, PITCH'-DARK, dark as pitch: very dark.--ns. PITCH'-BLENDE, a black oxide of uranium; PITCH'-COAL, a kind of bituminous coal: jet; PITCH'INESS, state or quality of being pitchy; PITCH'-PINE, a kind of pine which yields pitch, and is much used in America as fuel; PITCH'-PLAS'TER, a plaster of Burgundy or white pitch; PITCH'-STONE, an old volcanic-like hardened pitch; PITCH'-TREE, the kauri pine, the Amboyna pine, or the Norway spruce.--adj. PITCH'Y, having the qualities of pitch: smeared with pitch: black like pitch: dark: dismal. [A.S. pic--L. pix, pic-is.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  91. pich, v.t. to thrust or fix in the ground: to fix or set in array: to fix the rate or price: to fling or throw: (mus.) to set the keynote of.--v.i. to settle, as something pitched: to come to rest from flight: to fall headlong: to fix the choice: to encamp: to rise and fall, as a ship.--n. a throw or cast from the hand: any point or degree of elevation or depression: degree: degree of slope: a descent: the height of a note in speaking or in music: (mech.) distance between the centres of two teeth in a wheel or a saw, or between the threads of a screw measured parallel to the axis.--ns. PITCHED'-BATT'LE, a battle in which the contending parties have fixed positions: a battle previously arranged for on both sides; PITCH'ER; PITCH'-FAR'THING, chuck-farthing; PITCH'FORK, a fork for pitching hay, &c.: a tuning-fork.--v.t. to lift with a pitchfork: to throw suddenly into any position.--ns. PITCH'ING, the act of throwing: a facing of stone along a bank to protect against the action of water; PITCH'PIPE, a small pipe to pitch the voice or tune with.--PITCH AND PAY (Shak.), pay down at once, pay ready-money; PITCH AND TOSS, a game in which coins are thrown at a mark, the person who throws nearest having the right of tossing all the coins, and keeping those which come down head uppermost; PITCH IN, to begin briskly; PITCH INTO, to assault. [A form of pick.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  92. Colophonia-p. Black, see Pinus sylvestris-p. Burgundy, see Pinus abies-p. Canada, see Pinus Canadensis. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  93. Height; steepness; especially, the height or acuteness of a tone as determined by the number of vibrations required to produce it. na
  94. [Latin] The lustrous, black, solid substance produced by boiling down tar; formerly used under the name of Pix (Pix navalis or Pix nigra). Burgundy p. (Pix burgundica, U. S., B. P.), the brownish, aromatic substance derived from Picea excelsa, or Norway spruce, of Europe. It consists of a volatile oil and a resin composed mainly of abietic acid. Used as a protective, stimulant, and mild counter-irritant in rheumatism, lumbago, sciatica, bronchitis, and pleurisy, in the form of Emplastrum picis burgunticos, U. S. (Emplastrum picis, B. P.,), and Emplastrum picis cantharidatum, U. S. Canada p. (Pix canadensis), from Tsuga canadensis or hemlock of North America, is used like Burgundy p. Liquid p. (Pix liquida), tar. na
  95. Black or dark-brown tenacious resinous substance, semi-liquid when hot, hard when cold, got from distillation of tar or turpentine, used for caulking seams of ships &c.; p. -blende, native oxide of uranium, found in p.- like masses; p.-cap, cap lined with p., used as instrument of torture; p.-pine, specially resinous kinds of p.-tree; pitchstone, old volcanic rock looking like p.; (v.t.) cover, coat, smear, with p. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  96. Fix& erect (tent, camp); (abs.) encamp; (Crick.) p. wickets, fix stumps in ground& place bails; fix, plant, (thing) in definite position; expose (wares) for sale in market &c.; pave, prepare, (road) with stones set on end; pitched (arranged) battle; (Mus.) set at particular pitch, (fig.) express in particular style; throw, fling; (in games) throw (flat object) towards a mark; (slang) tell (tale, yarn); fall heavily (on one\'s head, into, &c.); (of ship) plunge in longitudinal direction (cf. ROLL); p. in (colloq.), set to work vigorously; p. into (colloq.), assail forcibly with blows, words, &c.; make vigorous attack on, (person, food, &c.); p. upon, decide upon; p.-&-toss, game of skill& chance in which coins are pitched at a mark; p.-farthing, = CHUCK-farthing. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  97. Pitching (e.g. of ship); mode of delivering cricket-ball in bowling; quantity of commodity pitched in market; place at which one (e. g. street performer, bookmaker) is stationed; (Crick.) place between& about wickets; height to which falcon &c. soars before swooping on prey, as fly a high &c. p. (also fig.); height, degree, intensity, (of quality &c.); (Mus.) degree of acuteness or graveness of tone; degree of slope; steepness of roof\'s slope; (Mech.) distance between successive points or lines, e.g. between successive teeth of cog-wheel; p.-pipe, small pipe blown by mouth to set p. for singing or tuning; p.-wheel, toothed wheel engaging with another. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  98. A black substance derived from tar. American pocket medical dictionary.
  99. The substance left behind in the distillation of tar. It is a shiny, black, solid substance which, on the application of moderate heat, becomes viscous and adhesive. It consists of fixed resin and volatile resinous principles. It was formerly official in the Br. Ph. as pix (pix nigra or pix arida). Appleton's medical dictionary.
  100. When two toothed wheels work together, their motion is the same as that of two circles on the same centres moving by a pure rolling contact ; the circle corresponding to either wheel is its Pitch circle or P. line ; each tooth of the wheel is partly within and partly projects beyond the pitch circle. The P. of a wheel is the distance from one side of a tooth to the same side of the next tooth, i.e. the distance occupied by one complete tooth and space measured along the pitch circle. The P. of a screw is the distance between two consecutive turns of the thread measured parallel to the axis. The P. of rivets is the distance from centre to centre of any two adjacent rivets. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  101. n. [Latin, Greek] A thick, black, sticky substance obtained by boiling down tar;—a viscid resinous substance obtained by incision from the bark of the silver fir and other pine trees. Cabinet Dictionary
  102. n. [French] A point or peak;—the highest rise; extreme point; greatest altitude;—height in size or stature;—degree of ascent; rate of advance;—place or position attained;—degree of elevation of the voice, or of an instrument, &c.;—the point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; descent; slope. Cabinet Dictionary

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