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Definitions of eat

  1. use up, as of resources or materials; "this car consumes a lot of gas"; "We exhausted our savings"; "They run through 20 bottles of wine a week" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. cause to deteriorate due to the action of water, air, or an acid; "The acid corroded the metal"; "The steady dripping of water rusted the metal stopper in the sink" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. worry or cause anxiety in a persistent way; "What's eating you?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. eat a meal; take a meal; "We did not eat until 10 P.M. because there were so many phone calls"; "I didn't eat yet, so I gladly accept your invitation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. take in solid food; "She was eating a banana"; "What did you eat for dinner last night?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. take in food; used of animals only; "This dog doesn't eat certain kinds of meat"; "What do whales eat?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. use up (resources or materials); "this car consumes a lot of gas"; "We exhausted our savings"; "They run through 20 bottles of wine a week" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. To corrode, as metal, by rust; to consume the flesh, as a cancer; to waste or wear away; to destroy gradually; to cause to disappear. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To take food; to feed; especially, to take solid, in distinction from liquid, food; to board. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To taste or relish; as, it eats like tender beef. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To make one's way slowly. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. of Eat. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To chew and swallow as food; to devour; - said especially of food not liquid; as, to eat bread. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To chew and swallow, as food; devour; consume; corrode; waste or wear away; as, rust eats away the surface. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To take food; to become corroded. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Eater. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Ate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. Eating. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. 1. To take solid food. 2. To chew and swallow any substance as one would food. 3. To corrode. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  20. To chew and swallow: to consume: to corrode. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To take food:-pr.p. eating; pa.t. ate (at or et); pa.p. eaten (et'n) or (obs.) eat (et). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Eaten. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To chew and swallow; take food; consume; corrode. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To chew and swallow, as food. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To consume or corrode. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. To take sustenance; feed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To gnaw; penetrate; corrode. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To bite or chew and swallow, as food; to corrode or gnaw away; to consume; to oppress; to enjoy; to feast. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To take food; to gnaw; to taste. To eat one's terms, to study for the English bar, so said as the student has to eat so many dinners each term in the public hall of the legal body to which he attaches himself, before being reckoned to have completed it. To eat one's words, to take back or retract what has been uttered. To cat, eat in, or eat into, to wear away by gnawing or corrosion. To eat out, to consume. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To consume, as food with the mouth; to wear away or corrode; to gnaw; to take food. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. To chew and swallow as food; to devour; -- said especially of food not liquid; as, to eat bread. mso.anu.edu.au
  32. [=e]t, v.t. to chew and swallow: to consume: to corrode.--v.i. to take food:--pr.p. eat'ing; pa.t. ate ([=a]t or et); pa.p. eaten ([=e]tn) or (obs.) eat (et).--adj. EAT'ABLE, fit to be eaten.--n. anything used as food (chiefly pl.).--ns. EAT'AGE, grass or fodder for horses, &c.: the right to eat; EAT'ER, one who, or that which, eats or corrodes; EAT'ING, the act of taking food.--p.adj. that eats: corroding.--ns. EAT'ING-HOUSE, a place where provisions are sold ready dressed: a restaurant; GOOD'-EAT'ING, something good for food.--EAT AWAY, to destroy gradually: to gnaw; EAT IN, used of the action of acid; EAT ITS HEAD OFF, used of an animal which costs as much for food as it is worth; EAT ONE'S HEART, to pine away, brooding over misfortune; EAT ONE'S TERMS, to study for the bar, with allusion to the number of times in a term that a student must dine in the hall of an Inn of Court; EAT ONE'S WORDS, to retract: to recant; EAT OUT, to finish eatables: to encroach upon; EAT THE AIR (Shak.) to be deluded with hopes; EAT UP, to devour: to consume, absorb; EAT WELL, to have a good appetite. [A.S. etan; cf. Ger. essen, Ice. eta, L. ed[)e]re, Gr. edein.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. (past ate, eat, pron. et; p.p. eaten, pron. etn). Masticate& swallow (solid food); swallow (soup); e. one\'s words, retract them in humiliating manner; e. one\'s terms, be studying for the bar; e. HUMBLE pie; e. (person) out of house& home, ruin him by eating (lit. & fig.) all he has; horse &c. eats its head off, costs more to feed than it is worth; (intr. as pass.) the cakes e. crisp; destroy, consume, as e. one\'s heart out, suffer silently; e. away, destroy gradually (lit. & fig.); e. up, consume completely, waste, (lit. & fig.); e. up, consume completely, waste, (lit. & fig.), absorb, as eaten up with pride. Hence eatable a. & n. (usu. pl.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  34. e. dinners, = EAT one\'s terms; well, don\'t e. me! (joc. reply to vehement protest &c). Concise Oxford Dictionary

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