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Definitions of judge

  1. put on trial or hear a case and sit as the judge at the trial of; "The football star was tried for the murder of his wife"; "The judge tried both father and son in separate trials" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. form an opinion about; judge tentatively; form an estimate of, as of quantities or time; "I estimate this chicken to weigh at three pounds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. an authority who is able to estimate worth or quality Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a public official authorized to decide questions bought before a court of justice Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. determine the result of, as of a competition Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. pronounce judgment on; "They labeled him unfit to work here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. form an opinion of or pass judgment on; "I cannot judge some works of modern art" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. determine the result of (a competition) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. judge tentatively or form an estimate of (quantities or time); "I estimate this chicken to weigh three pounds" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. A public officer who is invested with authority to hear and determine litigated causes, and to administer justice between parties in courts held for that purpose. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. One who has skill, knowledge, or experience, sufficient to decide on the merits of a question, or on the quality or value of anything; one who discerns properties or relations with skill and readiness; a connoisseur; an expert; a critic. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. One of supreme magistrates, with both civil and military powers, who governed Israel for more than four hundred years. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. The title of the seventh book of the Old Testament; the Book of Judges. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To hear and determine, as in causes on trial; to decide as a judge; to give judgment; to pass sentence. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To assume the right to pass judgment on another; to sit in judgment or commendation; to criticise or pass adverse judgment upon others. See Judge, v. t., 3. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To compare facts or ideas, and perceive their relations and attributes, and thus distinguish truth from falsehood; to determine; to discern; to distinguish; to form an opinion about. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To hear and determine by authority, as a case before a court, or a controversy between two parties. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To examine and pass sentence on; to try; to doom. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To arrogate judicial authority over; to sit in judgment upon; to be censorious toward. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To determine upon or deliberation; to esteem; to think; to reckon. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To exercise the functions of a magistrate over; to govern. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. A person appointed to decide in atrial of skill, speed, etc., between two or more parties; an umpire; as, a judge in a horse race. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The presiding official in a court of law; a person appointed to decide in a trial of skill, speed, etc., between two or more persons; one who has skill, knowledge, or experience to decide on the quality or value of anything. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To examine and pass sentence upon; hold an opinion upon; consider; come to a conclusion concerning; to decide with authority; as, to judge a case. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. To form an opinion or decision after careful consideration; pass sentence. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To point out or declare what is just or law: to hear and decide: to pass sentence: to compare facts to determine the truth: to form or pass an opinion: to distinguish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To hear and determine authoritatively: to sentence: to be censorious towards: to consider: (B.) to condemn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. One who judges: a civil officer who hears and settles any cause, either in connection with a jury or without one: an arbitrator: one who can decide upon the merit of anything: in Jewish history, a magistrate having civil and military powers:-pl. title of 7th book of the Old Testament. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. One appointed to hear and decide; one competent to decide. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. To determine; sentence; consider. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To hear and decide; give sentence; form an opinion. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To come to a conclusion regarding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. To decide upon evidence; try judicially. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. To form a judgment; sit in judgment; express judgment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. To consider. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. An officer authorized to administer justice in a court. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. One who decides upon the merits of things, as in contests; a connoisseur. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A civil officer invested with authority to hear and determine causes, civil or criminal, between parties; one skilled in judging merit or worth; in the history of Israel, a chief magistrate, with civil and military powers. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To hear and determine a case; to examine and pass sentence on; to try; to pass severe sentence upon; to reckon; to consider. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To hear and determine, as in causes on trial; to pass sentence; to distinguish; to compare facts or ideas, and perceive their agreement or disagreement, and thus to distinguish truth from falsehood. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. The presiding officer in a court of law who awards punishment to offenders; a chief magistrate; one who has skill to decide on the merits or value of; the Supreme Being. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. To hear and determine; to decide; to form or give an opinion; to distinguish; to pass sentence upon; to be censorious toward; to censure severely; to doom. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. A person appointed to decide in a/trial of skill, speed, etc., between two or more parties; an umpire; as, a judge in a horse race. mso.anu.edu.au
  44. (Heb. shophet, pl. shophetim), properly a magistrate or ruler, rather than one who judges in the sense of trying a cause. This is the name given to those rulers who presided over the affairs of the Israelites during the interval between the death of Joshua and the accession of Saul ( Judges 2:18 ), a period of general anarchy and confusion. "The office of judges or regents was held during life, but it was not hereditary, neither could they appoint their successors. Their authority was limited by the law alone, and in doubtful cases they were directed to consult the divine King through the priest by Urim and Thummim ( Numbers 27:21 ). Their authority extended only over those tribes by whom they had been elected or acknowledged. There was no income attached to their office, and they bore no external marks of dignity. The only cases of direct divine appointment are those of Gideon and Samson, and the latter stood in the peculiar position of having been from before his birth ordained 'to begin to deliver Israel.' Deborah was called to deliver Israel, but was already a judge. Samuel was called by the Lord to be a prophet but not a judge, which ensued from the high gifts the people recognized as dwelling in him; and as to Eli, the office of judge seems to have devolved naturally or rather ex officio upon him." Of five of the judges, Tola ( Judges 10:1 ), Jair (3), Ibzan, Elon, and Abdon ( 12:8-15 ), we have no record at all beyond the bare fact that they were judges. Sacred history is not the history of individuals but of the kingdom of God in its onward progress. In Exodus 2:14 Moses is so styled. This fact may indicate that while for revenue purposes the "taskmasters" were over the people, they were yet, just as at a later time when under the Romans, governed by their own rulers. biblestudytools.com
  45. juj, v.i. to point out or declare what is just or law: to hear and decide: to pass sentence: to compare facts to determine the truth: to form or pass an opinion: to distinguish.--v.t. to hear and determine authoritatively: to sentence: to decide the merits of: to be censorious towards: to consider: (B.) to condemn.--n. one who judges: a civil officer who hears and settles any cause: an arbitrator: one who can decide upon the merit of anything: in Jewish history, a supreme magistrate having civil and military powers: (pl.) title of 7th book of the Old Testament.--ns. JUDGE'SHIP, the office of a judge; JUDG'MENT, act of judging: the comparing of ideas to elicit truth: faculty by which this is done, the reason: opinion formed: taste: sentence: condemnation: doom; JUDG'MENT-DAY, the day on which God will pronounce final judgment on mankind; JUDG'MENT-DEBT, a debt evidenced by legal record; JUDG'MENT-HALL, a hall where a court of justice meets; JUDG'MENT-SEAT, seat or bench in a court from which judgment is pronounced. [Fr. juger--L. judic[=a]re--jus, law, dic[)e]re, to declare.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  46. Public officer appointed to hear& try causes in court of justice; (of God) supreme arbiter; (Heb. Hist.) officer having temporary authority in Israel in period between Joshua& the kings; (pl., abbr. Judg.) book of O. T.; person appointed to decide dispute or contest; person who decides a question; person who is qualified to decide on merits of thing or question, as am no j. of that, good j. of claret. Hence judgeship (1,2) n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. Pronounce sentence on (person) in court of justice; try (cause); decide (question); decide, decree, (that &c.); form opinion about, estimate, (person &c. by his deeds &c.); criticize, censure; conclude, consider, suppose, (thing to be, that, &c.); act as judge; form a judgment (of thing &c.). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. n. [Latin] A civil officer invested with authority to hear and determine causes civil or criminal ; - one who sits on the bench in police or other inferior courts ; - one to whom a question is referred ; arbitrator ; umpire ; referee ; a connoisseur ; an expert ; - a chief magistrate, such as those who governed the Hebrew nation more than three hundred years ; - the Supreme Being ; God the judge of all ; - pl. The title of the seventh book of the Old Testament. Cabinet Dictionary
  49. One who is invested with authority to determine any cause or question, real or personal; one who presides in a court of judicature; one who has skill sufficient to decide upon the merit of any thing. Complete Dictionary

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