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Definitions of object

  1. the goal intended to be attained (and which is believed to be attainable); "the sole object of her trip was to see her children" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. express or raise an objection or protest; express dissent; "She never objected to the amount of work her boss charged her with" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the focus of cognitions or feelings; "objects of thought"; "the object of my affection" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a grammatical constituent that is acted upon; "the object of the verb" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (grammar) a constituent that is acted upon; "the object of the verb" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. express or raise an objection or protest or criticism or express dissent; "She never objected to the amount of work her boss charged her with"; "When asked to drive the truck, she objected that she did not have a driver's license" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. be averse to or express disapproval of; "My wife objects to modern furniture" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. To set before or against; to bring into opposition; to oppose. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To offer in opposition as a criminal charge or by way of accusation or reproach; to adduce as an objection or adverse reason. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. That which is put, or which may be regarded as put, in the way of some of the senses; something visible or tangible; as, he observed an object in the distance; all the objects in sight; he touched a strange object in the dark. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. That which is set, or which may be regarded as set, before the mind so as to be apprehended or known; that of which the mind by any of its activities takes cognizance, whether a thing external in space or a conception formed by the mind itself; as, an object of knowledge, wonder, fear, thought, study, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. That by which the mind, or any of its activities, is directed; that on which the purpose are fixed as the end of action or effort; that which is sought for; end; aim; motive; final cause. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Sight; show; appearance; aspect. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Opposed; presented in opposition; also, exposed. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To make opposition in words or argument; - usually followed by to. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Anything that can be seen or touched; anything that can be known or understood by the mind; motive; end; aim; in grammar, a word, phrase, or clause that receives the action of the verb and completes the predicate; opposite to subject. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To urge as a reason against. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To make opposition: usually with to; to disapprove. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Objector. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To offer in opposition: to oppose. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Anything set or thrown before the mind: that which is sought for: end: motive: (gram.) that which follows a transitive verb. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. Anything set before the mind or senses; thing perceived or thought of; end; motive. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To offer in opposition. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To allege as a reason against something. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. To declare oneself opposed to something. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Anything that may be perceived by the senses. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. That which is affected by an action. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A purpose; aim. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. That about which any faculty is employed, or to which it is directed; something presented to or before the mind; end; ultimate purpose; that which follows as acted upon by a transitive verb. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. To oppose; to offer in opposition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. To offer reasons against. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. Anything set over against or before one; a thing seen; that with which the mind is occupied in the act of knowing; that on which the mind is fixed, as the end of an action or effort; anything presented to the mind; end; ultimate purpose; in gram., the noun or pronoun which follows a transitive verb or a preposition. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. To oppose in words or arguments; to present or offer in opposition. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  36. To make opposition in words or argument; -- usually followed by to. mso.anu.edu.au
  37. To make opposition in words or argument; to express one's displeasure; usually followed by to; as, she objected to his vulgar language. dictgcide_fs
  38. That which is put, or which may be regarded as put, in the way of some of the senses; something visible or tangible and persists for an appreciable time; as, he observed an object in the distance; all the objects in sight; he touched a strange object in the dark. dictgcide_fs
  39. Anything which is set, or which may be regarded as set, before the mind so as to be apprehended or known; that of which the mind by any of its activities takes cognizance, whether a thing external in space or a conception formed by the mind itself; as, an object of knowledge, wonder, fear, thought, study, etc. dictgcide_fs
  40. That toward which the mind, or any of its activities, is directed; that on which the purpose are fixed as the end of action or effort; that which is sought for; goal; end; aim; motive; final cause. dictgcide_fs
  41. Any set of data that is or can be manipulated or referenced by a computer program as a single entity; the term may be used broadly, to include files, images (such as icons on the screen), or small data structures. dictgcide_fs
  42. Anything which exists and which has attributes; distinguished from attributes, processes, and relations. dictgcide_fs
  43. ob-jekt', v.t. to place before the view: to throw in the way of: to offer in opposition: to oppose.--v.i. to oppose: to give a reason against.--n. OBJECTIFIC[=A]'TION.--v.t. OBJECT'IFY, to make objective.--n. OBJEC'TION, act of objecting: anything said or done in opposition: argument against.--adj. OBJEC'TIONABLE, that may be objected to: requiring to be disapproved of.--adv. OBJEC'TIONABLY, in an objectionable manner or degree.--adj. OBJECT'IVE, relating to an object: being exterior to the mind: substantive, self-existent: setting forth what is external, actual, practical, apart from the sensations or emotions of the speaker: as opposed to Subjective, pertaining to that which is real or exists in nature, in contrast with what is ideal or exists merely in thought: (gram.) belonging to the case of the object.--n. (gram.) the case of the object: in microscopes, &c., the lens which brings the rays to a focus: the point to which the operations of an army are directed.--adv. OBJECT'IVELY.--ns. OBJECT'IVENESS; OBJECT'IVISM.--adj. OBJECTIVIST'IC.--ns. OBJECTIV'ITY, state of being objective; OBJECT'OR. [Fr.,--L. object[=a]re, a freq. of objic[)e]re, -jectum--ob, in the way of, jac[)e]re, to throw.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  44. ob'jekt, n. anything perceived or set before the mind: that which is sought after, or that toward which an action is directed: end: motive: (gram.) that toward which the action of a transitive verb is directed.--ns. OB'JECT-FIND'ER, a device in microscopes for locating an object in the field before examination by a higher power; OB'JECT-GLASS, the glass at the end of a telescope or microscope next the object; OB'JECTIST, one versed in the objective philosophy.--adj. OB'JECTLESS, having no object: purposeless.--ns. OB'JECT-LESS'ON, a lesson in which the object to be described, or a representation of it, is shown; OB'JECT-SOUL, a vital principle attributed by the primitive mind to inanimate objects. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. Thing placed before eyes or presented to sense, material thing, thing observed with optical instrument or represented in picture; person or thing of pitiable or ridiculous aspect; person or thing to which action or feeling is directed, subject of or for, (the Bible had been the o. of his study; he is a proper o. of or for charity); thing aimed at, end, purpose; (Metaphys.) thing thought of or apprehended as correlative to the thinking mind or subject, external thing, the non-ego; (Gram:) noun or noun-equivalent governed by active transitive verb or by preposition (direct, indirect, o., that primarily, secondarily, affected by action, as shilling, him, in I gave him a shilling); o.-ball, at which player aims his in billiards &c.; o.-finder, contrivance for registering position of o. on mounted microscopic slide so as to find it again; o.-glass or -lens, lens in telescope &c. nearest the o.; o.-lesson, instruction about a material o. that is present for inspection, (fig.) striking practical illustration of some principle; o.-plate, on which o. is placed for microscopic examination; o.-staff, surveyor\'s levelling-staff. Hence objectless a. [medieval Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. Adduce (quality, fact) as objection (to theory &c.); state (usu. that-clause) as damaging fact to or against person &c.; state objection, feel or express disapproval, have objection or dislike to (I o. to being, & incorrectly to be, treated like this). Hence objector n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. I o., words used in House of Commons in announcing intention to oppose a motion &c. (esp. for purpose of converting it from unopposed to opposed business& so shelving it indefinitely); no o., formula in advertisements &c. announcing that the other party may make his own terms in the specified respect (money, time, distance, &c., no o.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. See Subject; Subjective and objective. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  49. n. [Latin] Material body or substance perceived or cognizable by the senses ;- any thing material, mental, or spiritual, presented to the mind for observation or consideration ; matter or subject of thought and contemplation ;—that which the mind has in view to accomplish ; aim ; design ; end ; ultimate purpose or result ;—person or thing brought before the senses to awaken pity or charity ;—in grammar the objective case after a transitive verb. Cabinet Dictionary

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