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Definitions of bond

  1. stick to firmly; "Will this wallpaper adhere to the wall?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the property of sticking together (as of glue and wood) or the joining of surfaces of different composition Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a connection based on kinship or marriage or common interest; "the shifting alliances within a large family"; "their friendship constitutes a powerful bond between them" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. create social or emotional ties; "The grandparents want to bond with the child" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a connection that fastens things together Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (criminal law) money that must be forfeited by the bondsman if an accused person fails to appear in court for trial; "the judge set bail at $10,000"; "a $10,000 bond was furnished by an alderman" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. British secret operative 007 in novels by Ian Fleming Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. United States civil rights leader who was elected to the legislature in Georgia but was barred from taking his seat because he opposed the Vietnam War (born 1940) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. an electrical force linking atoms Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a certificate of debt (usually interest-bearing or discounted) that is issued by a government or corporation in order to raise money Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. bring together in a common cause or emotion; "The death of their child had drawn them together" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a superior quality of strong durable white writing paper; originally made for printing documents Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a certificate of debt (usually interest-bearing or discounted) that is issued by a government or corporation in order to raise money; the issuer is required to pay a fixed sum annually until maturity and then a fixed sum to repay the principal Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. issue bonds on Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. That which binds, ties, fastens, or confines, or by which anything is fastened or bound, as a cord, chain, etc.; a band; a ligament; a shackle or a manacle. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The state of being bound; imprisonment; captivity, restraint. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A binding force or influence; a cause of union; a uniting tie; as, the bonds of fellowship. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Moral or political duty or obligation. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A writing under seal, by which a person binds himself, his heirs, executors, and administrators, to pay a certain sum on or before a future day appointed. This is a single bond. But usually a condition is added, that, if the obligor shall do a certain act, appear at a certain place, conform to certain rules, faithfully perform certain duties, or pay a certain sum of money, on or before a time specified, the obligation shall be void; otherwise it shall remain in full force. If the condition is not performed, the bond becomes forfeited, and the obligor and his heirs are liable to the payment of the whole sum. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. An instrument (of the nature of the ordinary legal bond) made by a government or a corporation for purpose of borrowing money; as, a government, city, or railway bond. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The state of goods placed in a bonded warehouse till the duties are paid; as, merchandise in bond. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The union or tie of the several stones or bricks forming a wall. The bricks may be arranged for this purpose in several different ways, as in English or block bond (Fig. 1), where one course consists of bricks with their ends toward the face of the wall, called headers, and the next course of bricks with their lengths parallel to the face of the wall, called stretchers; Flemish bond (Fig.2), where each course consists of headers and stretchers alternately, so laid as always to break joints; Cross bond, which differs from the English by the change of the second stretcher line so that its joints come in the middle of the first, and the same position of stretchers comes back every fifth line; Combined cross and English bond, where the inner part of the wall is laid in the one method, the outer in the other. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A unit of chemical attraction; as, oxygen has two bonds of affinity. It is often represented in graphic formulae by a short line or dash. See Diagram of Benzene nucleus, and Valence. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To place under the conditions of a bond; to mortgage; to secure the payment of the duties on (goods or merchandise) by giving a bond. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To dispose in building, as the materials of a wall, so as to secure solidity. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A vassal or serf; a slave. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. In a state of servitude or slavery; captive. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A heavy copper wire or rod connecting adjacent rails of an electric railway track when used as a part of the electric circuit. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. League; association; confederacy. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A written agreement purchased from a bonding company that guarantees a person will properly carry out a specific act, such as managing funds, showing up in court, providing good title to a piece of real estate or completing a construction project. If the person who purchased the bond fails at his or her task, the bonding company will pay the aggrieved party an amount up to the value of the bond. An interest-bearing document issued by a government or company as evidence of a debt. A bond provides pre-determined payments at a set date to the bond holder. Bonds may be "registered" bonds, which provide payment to the bond holder whose name is recorded with the issuer and appears on the bond certificate, or "bearer" bonds, which provide payments to whomever holds the bond in-hand.
  32. Anything that fastens or confines; a manacle; a cause of union; a uniting influence; as, the bond of peace; an obligation; an agreement under seal by which a person promises that he and his heirs, etc., a promise to pay a certain sum on or before a definite date; a certificate, bearing interest, issued by a government or company in return for money borrowed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To put (dutiable goods) into a warehouse, the duties remaining unpaid till the goods are taken out, but security being given for their payment; to place under a mortgage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. In a state of servitude or slavery; captive; as, "whether he be bond or free". The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. That which binds, a band: link of connection or union: a writing of obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. That which binds; a band; legal instrument binding on its maker. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  37. To put under bond; mortgage; bind. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Subject to servitude; enslaved. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. That which binds; a band; obligation. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. Fetters; captivity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  41. An interest-bearing debt-certificate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  42. In a state of servitude or slavery. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. Anything that binds, as a cord or band; link of connection; an obligation or promise in writing to do or pay something on or before a given day; any written promise; a government store for goods till the duty is paid; chains; imprisonment; captivity; the disposition of stones or bricks in a wall so that the vertical joints are separated from each other. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To put imported goods in a customs warehouse till the duties chargeable thereon are paid. See Bind. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. Anything that binds, as a rope, a chain, &c.; union; an obligation; a vow or promise; a written agreement; a government store for goods on which the duty remains unpaid. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. To place in government storehouses; to secure; to give bond for. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. In a state of servitude or slavery; bound-as bondman, bondmaid, bond-servant, bond-service, bond-slave. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. an obligation of any kind ( Numbers 30:2 Numbers 30:4 Numbers 30:12 ). The word means also oppression or affliction ( Psalms 116:16 ; Phil 1:7 ). Christian love is the "bond of perfectness" ( Colossians 3:14 ), and the influences of the Spirit are the "bond of peace" ( Ephesians 4:3 ). biblestudytools.com
  49. 1.a signed promise to pay an amount to do something on a date. Documents like contracts and loan agreements are bonds. 2.a contract with three parties. One party gives guaranty to a customer that a contractor will perform the actions agreed to. If the w thelawdictionary.org
  50. Contract. An obligation or bond is a deed whereby the obligor, obliges himself, his heirs, executors and administrators, to pay a certain sum of money to another at a day appointed. But see 2 Shepl. 185. If this be all, the bond is called a single one, simplex obligatio; but there is generally a condition added, that if the obligor pays a smaller sum, or does, or omits to do some particular act, the obligation shall be void. 2 Bl. Com. 840. The word bond ex vi termini imports a sealed instrument. 2 S. & R. 502; 1 Bald. R. 129; 2 Porter, R. 19; 1 Blackf. R. 241; Harp. R. 434; 6 Verm. R. 40. See Condition; Interest of money; Penalty. It is proposed to consider: 1. The form of a bond, namely, the words by which it may be made, and the ceremonies required. 2. The condition. 3. The performance or discharge. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  51. -I. 1. There must be parties to a bond, an obligor and obligee : for where a bond was made with condition that the obligor should pay twenty pounds to such person or persons; as E. H. should, by her last will and testament in writing, name and appoint the same to be paid, and E. H. did not appoint any person to, whom the same should be paid, it was held that the money was not payable to the executors of E. H. Hob. 9. No particular form of words are essential to create an obligation, but any words which declare the intention of the parties, and denote that one is bound to the other, will be sufficient, provided the ceremonies mentioned below have been observed. Shep. Touch. 367-8; Bac. Abr. Obligations, B; Com. Dig. Obligations, B 1. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  52. It must be in writing, on paper or parchment, and if it be made on other materials it is void. Bac. Abr. Obligations, A. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  53. It must be sealed, though it is not necessary that it should be mentioned in the writing that it is sealed. As to what is a sufficient sealing, see the above case, and the word Seal. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  54. It must be delivered by the party whose bond it is, to the other. Bac. Abr. Obligations, C. But the delivery and acceptance may be by attorney. The date is not considered of the substance of a deed, and therefore a bond which either has no date or an impossible one is still good, provided the real day of its being dated or given, that is, delivered, can be proved. 2 Bl. Com. 304; Com. Dig. Fait, B 3; 3 Call, 309. See Date. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  55. - II. The condition is either for the payment of money, or for the performance of something else. In the latter case, if the condition be against some rule of law merely, positively impossible at the time of making it, uncertain or insensible, the condition alone is void, and the bond shall stand single and unconditional; for it is the folly of the obligor to enter into such an obligation, from which he can never be released. If it be to do a thing malum in se, the obligation itself is void, the whole contract being unlawful. 2 Bl. Com. 340; Bac. Abr. Conditions, K, L; Com. Dig. Conditions, D 1, D 2, D 3, D 7, D 8. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  56. - III. 1. When, by the condition of an obligation, the act to be done to the obligee is of its own nature transitory, as payment of money, delivery of charters, or the like, and no time is limited, it ought to be performed in convenient time. 6 Co. 31 Co. Lit. 208; Roll. Abr. 436. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  57. A payment before the day is good; Co. Lit. 212, a; or before action brought. 10 Mass. 419; 11 Mass. 217. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  58. If the condition be to do a thing within a certain time, it may be performed the last da of the time appointed. Bac. Abr. Conditions, P 3. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  59. If the condition be to do an act, without limiting any time, he who has the benefit may do it at what time he pleases. Com. Dig. Conditions, G 3. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  60. When the place where the act to be performed is agreed upon, the party who is to perform it, is not obliged to seek the opposite party elsewhere; nor is he to whom it is to be performed bound to accept of the performance in another place. Roll. 445, 446 Com. Dig. Conditions, G 9 Bac. Abr. Conditions, P 4. See Performance. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  61. For what amounts to a breach of a condition in a bond see Bac. Abr. Conditions, 0; Com. Dig. Conditions, M; and this Dict. tit. Breach. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  62. A financial instrument (of the nature of the ordinary legal bond) made by a government or a corporation for purpose of borrowing money; a written promise to pay a specific sum of money on or before a specified day, given in return for a sum of money; as, a government, city, or railway bond. dictgcide_fs
  63. The union or tie of the several stones or bricks forming a wall. The bricks may be arranged for this purpose in several different ways, as in English bond or block bond (Fig. 1), where one course consists of bricks with their ends toward the face of the wall, called headers, and the next course of bricks with their lengths parallel to the face of the wall, called stretchers; Flemish bond (Fig.2), where each course consists of headers and stretchers alternately, so laid as always to break joints; Cross bond, which differs from the English by the change of the second stretcher line so that its joints come in the middle of the first, and the same position of stretchers comes back every fifth line; Combined cross and English bond, where the inner part of the wall is laid in the one method, the outer in the other. dictgcide_fs
  64. A unit of chemical attraction between atoms; as, oxygen has two bonds of affinity. Also called chemical bond. It is often represented in graphic formulae by a short line or dash. See Diagram of Benzene nucleus, and Valence. Several types of bond are distinguished by chemists, as double bond, triple bond, covalent bond, hydrogen bond. dictgcide_fs
  65. bond, n. that which binds, a band: link of connection or union: a writing of obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract: any constraining or any cementing force: in building, the connection of one stone or brick with another, made by lapping the one over the other as the work is carried up, as in ENGLISH BOND, FLEMISH BOND, &c.: (pl.) imprisonment, captivity.--adj. bound: in a state of servitude.--v.t. to put imported goods in the customs' warehouses till the duties on them are paid--hence BONDED STORES or WAREHOUSES, TO TAKE OUT OF BOND, &c.--p.adj. BOND'ED, secured by bond, as duties.--ns. BOND'ER, a binding stone or brick; BOND'-HOLD'ER, a person who holds bonds of a private person or public company; BOND'ING, that arrangement by which goods remain in the customs' warehouses till the duties are paid; BOND'MAID, BOND'WOMAN, BONDS'WOMAN, a woman-slave; BOND'MAN, a man-slave; BOND'MANSHIP; BOND'SERV'ANT, a slave; BOND'-SERV'ICE, the condition of a bond-servant: slavery; BOND'-SLAVE, a slave; BONDS'MAN, a bondman or slave: a surety; BOND'-STONE, a stone which reaches a considerable distance into or entirely through a wall for the purpose of binding it together; BOND'-TIM'BER, timber built into a wall as it is carried up for the purpose of binding it together in a longitudinal direction.--BONDED DEBT, the debt of a corporation represented by the bonds it has issued, as contrasted with its floating debt. [A variant of band--A.S. bindan, to bind.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  66. Thing restraining bodily freedom, imprisonment, (rare, only in pl., esp. in bb.); fagot-withe; restraining or uniting force; binding engagement, agreement; deed by which A binds himself& his heirs &c. to pay a sum to B& his; government\'s or public company\'s documentary promise to pay borrowed money, debenture, (bondholder, person holding such document); (Customs, of goods) in b., stored under charge of Customs in bonded warehouse\' till importer pays duty (take out of b.); (Bricklaying) various methods (English b., Flemish b., &c.) of holding wall together by making bricks overlap; b.-stone, stone or brick running through wall. [middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. Bind together (bricks &c., see prec.); put customable goods into b. (see prec.); encumber with bonded debt (see BONDED). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. League, confederation, (see AFRICAnder). [Dutch] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. In slavery, not free, (archaic). Hence bondman, bondmaid, bondservant, bondservice, bondslave, nn. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  70. [A.S.] (Arch.) The arrangement of materials in a wall-"tied" together-in a way which shall show harmony of structure; known as English and Flemish B. See Stretcher. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  71. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A band, tie or link; that which fastens, confines or unites; a binding;—means of connection or union; moral forces or obligation;—a legal deed by which a person engages himself and his representatives to fulfill specific conditions or pay moneys;—pl. chains; fetters; captivity; imprisonment. Cabinet Dictionary
  72. Cords, or chains, with which any one is bound; ligament that holds any thing together; union, connexion; imprisonment, captivity; cement of union, cause of union; a writing of obligation; law by which any one is obliged. Complete Dictionary

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