Spellcheck.net

Definitions of humor

  1. the liquid parts of the body Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. put into a good mood Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous; "she didn't appreciate my humor"; "you can't survive in the army without a sense of humor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the quality of being funny; "I fail to see the humor in it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed (in ancient and medieval physiology) to determine your emotional and physical state; "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. (Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state; "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. Moisture, especially, the moisture or fluid of animal bodies, as the chyle, lymph, etc.; as, the humors of the eye, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A vitiated or morbid animal fluid, such as often causes an eruption on the skin. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. State of mind, whether habitual or temporary (as formerly supposed to depend on the character or combination of the fluids of the body); disposition; temper; mood; as, good humor; ill humor. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Changing and uncertain states of mind; caprices; freaks; vagaries; whims. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. That quality of the imagination which gives to ideas an incongruous or fantastic turn, and tends to excite laughter or mirth by ludicrous images or representations; a playful fancy; facetiousness. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To comply with the humor of; to adjust matters so as suit the peculiarities, caprices, or exigencies of; to adapt one's self to; to indulge by skillful adaptation; as, to humor the mind. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To help on by indulgence or compliant treatment; to soothe; to gratify; to please. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The faculty of expressing the amusing, clever, or comical or the keen perception and cleverly apt expression of connections between ideas that awaken amusement and pleasure. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed) Medical Dictionary DB
  17. Wit; merriment; the tendency to look at things from the mirthful side; caprice; proud conceit; temper; as, good or bad humor; petulance; peevishness; moisture of the body and eye; disease. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. To indulge; yield to a particular desire of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. 1. The uncombined fluids of the body-blood and lymph. 2. Any clear fluid or semifluid hyaline anatomical substance. 3. A chronic moist skin disease. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  20. The moisture of fluids of animal bodies: an animal fluid in an unhealthy state: state of mind (because once thought to depend on the humors of the body): disposition: caprice: a mental quality which delights in ludicrous and mirthful ideas. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To go in with the humor of: to gratify by compliance. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Animal fluid; state of mind; disposition; caprice; subtle kind of wit. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To comply with the humor of; indulge. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To yield to the humor or caprices of; adapt oneself to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Disposition; characteristic mood; whim. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A facetious turn of thought. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. An animal fluid. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A catuneous eruption. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Humour-h. Albugineous, Aqueous humour-h. Articularis, Synovia-h. Ceruminous, Cerumen-h. Doridis, Water, sea-h. Genitalis, Sperm-h. Glacialis, Crystalline, Corpus vitreum-h. Hyalinus seu Hyaloides, Corpus vitreum-h. Lacteus, Milk-h. Lacrymalis, Tear-h. Melancholicus, see Mercurialis-h. Mercurialis, see Mercurialis-h. Morgagnianus, Morgagni, humor of-h. Ovatus, Aqueous humour-h. Oviformis, Aqueous humour-h. Pericardii, see Pericardium-h. Purnlentus, Pus-h. Seminalis, Sperm-h. Venereus, Sperm-h. Vitreus, Corpus vitreum. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  30. [Latin] Literally, moisture; a liquid; especially, one of the body-liquids. Now usually restricted to denote the liquids of the eye, namely, the watery Aqueous h., filling the anterior and posterior chambers in front of the lens, the Crystalline h. (or lens), and the gelatinous Vitreous h., filling the chamber posterior to the lens. na
  31. Any fluid or semifluid of the body. American pocket medical dictionary.
  32. Any fluid of the body. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  33. Of the old writers, a fluid supposed to be present in the body which, by its excess, gave the type to a certain disease. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  34. In popular language, a chronic skin disease attributed to disorder of the blood. Appleton's medical dictionary.

What are the misspellings for humor?

X