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Definitions of manage

  1. be successful; achieve a goal; "She succeeded in persuading us all"; "I managed to carry the box upstairs"; "She pulled it off, even though we never thought her capable of it"; "The pianist negociated the difficult runs" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. come to terms or deal successfully with; "We got by on just a gallon of gas"; "They made do on half a loaf of bread every day" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. achieve something by means of trickery or devious methods Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. watch and direct; "Who is overseeing this project?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. carry on or manage; "We could do with a little more help around here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the appendage to an object that is designed to be held in order to use or move it; "he grabbed the hammer by the handle"; "it was an old briefcase but it still had a good grip" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. The handling or government of anything, but esp. of a horse; management; administration. See Manege. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To have under control and direction; to conduct; to guide; to administer; to treat; to handle. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Hence: Esp., to guide by careful or delicate treatment; to wield with address; to make subservient by artful conduct; to bring around cunningly to one's plans. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To train in the manege, as a horse; to exercise in graceful or artful action. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To treat with care; to husband. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To bring about; to contrive. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To direct affairs; to carry on business or affairs; to administer. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To conduct or carry on; govern; make obedient or controllable; to bring about; contrive. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To conduct or direct affairs. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To conduct with economy: to control: to wield: to handle: to have under command: to contrive: to train, as a horse. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To conduct affairs. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  18. MANAGER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. To conduct affairs; contrive. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  20. To conduct; control; contrive. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. To control; conduct; guide; contrive. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. To conduct business or affiairs. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Management; manege. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. To conduct; to direct; to control; to wield; to have under command; to make subservient; to husband; to treat judiciously. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To carry on the concerns of, as a house or business; to conduct or direct; to move or use easily; to control; to govern with address; to contrive. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. and proceeding from ignorance, carelessness, want of proper professional skill, disregard of established rules or principles, neglect, or a malicious or criminal intent. See Itodgers v. Kline, 56 Miss. 816, 31 Am. Rep. 380; Tucker v. Gillette, 22 Ohio Cir. Ct. R. 009; Abbott v. Mayfield, 8 Kan. App. 387. 56 Pac. 327; Ilibbard v. Thompson, 109 Mass. 2S8. The term is occasionally applied to lawyers, and then means generally any evil practice in a professional capacity, but rather with reference to the court aud its practice and process than to the client. See In re Baum, 55 Hun, 611, 8 N. Y. Supp. 771; In re Silkman, 88 App. Div. 102, 84 N. Y. Supp. 1025; Cowley v. O'Connell, 174 Mass. 253, 54 N. E. 558. thelawdictionary.org
  27. to guide by careful or delicate treatment; to wield with address; to make subservient by artful conduct; to bring around cunningly to one's plans. dictgcide_fs
  28. man'[=a]j, v.t. to guide by use of the hands: to have under command or control: to bring round to one's plans: to conduct with great carefulness: to wield: to handle: to contrive: to train by exercise, as a horse.--v.i. to conduct affairs.--n. MANAGEABIL'ITY, the quality of being manageable.--adj. MAN'AGEABLE, that can be managed: governable.--n. MAN'AGEABLENESS.--adv. MAN'AGEABLY.--ns. MAN'AGEMENT, art or act of managing: manner of directing or of using anything: administration: skilful treatment: a body of managers; MAN'AGER, one who manages: a person who controls a business or other concern.--adj. MANAG[=E]'RIAL, of or pertaining to a manager, or to management. [Fr. manége, the managing of a horse--It. maneggio--L. manus, the hand.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  29. (archaic). Training of horse; trained movements of horse, esp. short gallop; riding-school. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. Handle, wield, (tool &c.); conduct (undertaking &c.); control (household, institution, State); take charge of (cattle &c.); subject (person, animal) to one\'s control; gain one\'s ends with (person &c.) by flattery &c., whence managing a.; contrive (to do, often iron., as he managed to muddle it); succeed in one\'s aim (often with inadequate material &c.); (with can or be able to) cope with, make proper use of, as can you m. another slice?. Hence manageability, manageableness, nn., manageable a., manageably adv. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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