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Definitions of provoke

  1. call forth; of emotions, feelings, and responses; "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. provide the needed stimulus for Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. annoy continually or chronically; "He is known to harry his staff when he is overworked"; "This man harasses his female co-workers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. To stimulate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. To call forth; to call into being or action; esp., to incense to action, a faculty or passion, as love, hate, or ambition; hence, commonly, to incite, as a person, to action by a challenge, by taunts, or by defiance; to exasperate; to irritate; to offend intolerably; to cause to retaliate. Newage Dictionary DB
  6. To cause provocation or anger. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. To appeal. [A Latinism] Newage Dictionary DB
  8. To excite or stir up; as, to provoke criticism; to cause; as, to provoke a laugh; enrage or irritate; as, to provoke another to anger. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To call forth: to excite to action: to excite with anger: to offend: (B.) to challenge. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. PRoVOKINGLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Provocation. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To excite to action; call forth; excite to anger. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. To offend. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To occasion; to elicit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To produce resentment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. To call into action; to excite; to make angry; to incense; to stir up. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  17. To call forth or bring into action; to excite or move to; to make angry; to irritate; to produce anger. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. pr[=o]-v[=o]k', v.t. to call forth: to summon: to excite or call into action: to excite with anger: to offend: (B.) to challenge.--n. PROVOC[=A]'TION, act of provoking: that which provokes: any cause of danger.--adjs. PROVOC'ATIVE, PROVOC'ATORY, tending to provoke or excite.--n. anything that stirs up or provokes.--n. PROVOC'ATIVENESS, the quality of being provocative.--adj. PROV[=O]'KABLE.--ns. PROV[=O]KE'MENT (Spens.), provocation; PROV[=O]'KER, one who, or that which, provokes, causes, or promotes.--adj. PROV[=O]'KING, irritating.--adv. PROV[=O]'KINGLY.--THE PROVOCATION, the sojourn of the Jews in the wilderness, when they provoked God. [Fr. provoquer--L. provoc[=a]re, pro, forth, voc[=a]re, to call.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  19. Rouse, incite, (person to anger, to do); irritate; instigate, tempt, allure; call forth (indignation, inquiry, a storm, &c.); cause, as will p. fermentation. Hence provoking a., provokingly adv. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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