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Definitions of flow

  1. To move or run, as a fluid; to melt; to proceed or issue; to abound; to glide along smoothly; to rise, as the tide; to circulate, as the blood; to move in a stream. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To cover with water or other liquid; to overflow; to inundate; to flood. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To cover with varnish. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To overflow or inundate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To cover with water. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  6. To overflow; flood. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To move with a continual change of place among the particles or parts, as a fluid; to change place or circulate, as a liquid; as, rivers flow from springs and lakes; tears flow from the eyes. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To become liquid; to melt. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To proceed; to issue forth; as, wealth flows from industry and economy. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To glide along smoothly, without harshness or asperties; as, a flowing period; flowing numbers; to sound smoothly to the ear; to be uttered easily. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To have or be in abundance; to abound; to full, so as to run or flow over; to be copious. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To hang loose and waving; as, a flowing mantle; flowing locks. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To discharge blood in excess from the uterus. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To rise, as the tide; - opposed to ebb; as, the tide flows twice in twenty-four hours. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To run or spread, as water; circulate; glide; rise, as the tide; melt; issue forth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To run, as water; to rise, as the tide; to move in a stream, as air: to glide smoothly; to circulate, as the blood; to abound; to hang loose and waving; (B.) to melt. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To run, as a liquid; rise, as the tide; be poured forth; abound; hang loose and waving. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. be abundantly present; "The champagne flowed at the wedding" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. cover or swamp with water Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. cause to flow; "The artist flowed the washes on the paper" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. fall or flow in a certain way; "This dress hangs well"; "Her long black hair flowed down her back" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. imp. sing. of Fly, v. i. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To move, as a stream; glide; issue; result. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. To rise, as the tide; abound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To move along, as water; to run, as a liquid; to issue, as from a source; to glide along smoothly; to hang loose and waving, as a mantle. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. the monthly discharge of blood from the uterus of nonpregnant women from puberty to menopause; "the women were sickly and subject to excessive menstruation"; "a woman does not take the gout unless her menses be stopped"--Hippocrates; "the semen begins to appear in males and to be emitted at the same time of life that the catamenia begin to flow in females"--Aristotle Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. the act of flowing or streaming; continuous progression Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. the motion characteristic of fluids (liquids or gases) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. any uninterrupted stream or discharge Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. something that resembles a flowing stream in moving continuously; "a stream of people emptied from the terminal"; "the museum had planned carefully for the flow of visitors" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. A stream of water or other fluid; a current; as, a flow of water; a flow of blood. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Any gentle, gradual movement or procedure of thought, diction, music, or the like, resembling the quiet, steady movement of a river; a stream. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. The tidal setting in of the water from the ocean to the shore. See Ebb and flow, under Ebb. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A low-lying piece of watery land; - called also flow moss and flow bog. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A current or stream; the rise of the tide. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  36. A stream or current; the setting in of the tide from the ocean; abundance; copiousness; free expression. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. A stream; current; rising tide; copiousness. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  38. The act of flowing; a stream or current; incoming of the tide; a copious outpouring. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. A stream; a current; the rise of the tide; abundance; copiousness; free out flow. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Rise of water, as opposed to a fall; a stream; copiousness, as a flow of language; sudden plenty or abundance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for flow?

Usage examples for flow

  1. They flow in pity for you. – The Gamester (1753) by Edward Moore Commentator: Charles H. Peake Phillip R. Wikelund
  2. The Spaniards, however, were not thoroughly reduced until four years after, though they were being continually killed, beaten, cut to pieces, and otherwise dealt with, in a manner from which their reduction would seem to flow as a natural consequence. – The Comic History of Rome by Gilbert Abbott Becket
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