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Definitions of show

  1. pretending that something is the case in order to make a good impression; "they try to keep up appearances"; "that ceremony is just for show" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. provide evidence for; "The blood test showed that he was the father"; "Her behavior testified to her incompetence" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. show or demonstrate something to an interested audience; "She shows her dogs frequently"; "We will demo the new software in Washington" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. establish the validity of something, as by an example, explanation or experiment; "The experiment demonstrated the instability of the compound"; "The mathematician showed the validity of the conjecture" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. show in, or as in, a picture; "This scene depicts country life"; "the face of the child is rendered with much tenderness in this painting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. something intended to communicate a particular impression; "made a display of strength"; "a show of impatience"; "a good show of looking interested" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. make clear and visible; "The article revealed the policies of the government" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. give expression to; "She showed her disappointment" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. indicate a place, direction, person, or thing; either spatially or figuratively; "I showed the customer the glove section"; "He pointed to the empty parking space"; "he indicated his opponents" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. indicate a certain reading; of gauges and instruments; "The thermometer showed thirteen degrees below zero"; "The gauge read `empty'" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a public exhibition of entertainment; "a remarkable show of skill" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a public exhibition or entertainment; "they wanted to see some of the shows on Broadway" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. give evidence of, as of records; "The diary shows his distress that evening" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. finish third or better in a horse or dog race; "he bet $2 on number six to show" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. show (someone) to their seats, as in theaters or auditoriums; "The usher showed us to our seats" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. be or become visible or noticeable; "His good upbringing really shows"; "The dirty side will show" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. make visible or noticeable; "She showed her talent for cooking"; "Show me your etchings, please" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. To exhibit or present to view; to place in sight; to display; -- the thing exhibited being the object, and often with an indirect object denoting the person or thing seeing or beholding; as, to show a house; show your colors; shopkeepers show customers goods (show goods to customers). Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To exhibit to the mental view; to tell; to disclose; to reveal; to make known; as, to show one's designs. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Specifically, to make known the way to (a person); hence, to direct; to guide; to asher; to conduct; as, to show a person into a parlor; to show one to the door. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To make apparent or clear, as by evidence, testimony, or reasoning; to prove; to explain; also, to manifest; to evince; as, to show the truth of a statement; to show the causes of an event. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To exhibit or manifest one's self or itself; to appear; to look; to be in appearance; to seem. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To have a certain appearance, as well or ill, fit or unfit; to become or suit; to appear. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. The act of showing, or bringing to view; exposure to sight; exhibition. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. That which os shown, or brought to view; that which is arranged to be seen; a spectacle; an exhibition; as, a traveling show; a cattle show. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Proud or ostentatious display; parade; pomp. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Semblance; likeness; appearance. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. False semblance; deceitful appearance; pretense. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A discharge, from the vagina, of mucus streaked with blood, occuring a short time before labor. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A pale blue flame, at the top of a candle flame, indicating the presence of fire damp. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To present to view; exhibit; display; to tell, reveal, or make known; make clear; make (a person) understand; direct; as, to show one to his seat; bestow; as, to show favor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To present an appearance; to be visible or noticeable; as, the stain shows. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. The act of exhibiting or displaying; the exhibition or display; parade; pomp; deceitful appearance or pretense; as, a show of wealth; sign or promise, as of metal in a mine. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. Shower. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. Showed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. Shown. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. Showing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. An appearance; specifically the first appearance of blood in beginning menstruation or labor. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  40. Bloody discharge during labor. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  41. To present to view: to enable to perceive or know: to inform: to teach: to guide: to prove: to explain: to bestow. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. To appear: to look:-pa.p. shown or showed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Act of showing: display: a sight or spectacle: parade: appearance: plausibility: pretence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. Display; spectacle; appearance. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. To exhibit; display; prove; inform; bestow. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. To oppear. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  47. To present to view; exhibit; explain; reveal; prove; convince; confer; bestow. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. To become visible; appear; seem. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A spectacle; exhibition; display; parade; pretense; semblance; indication; promise. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. The act of showing; exhibition to view; appearance; ostentatious display; semblance; plausibility; pretence. Show of hands, a raising of hands as a vote. To show off, to exhibit in an ostentatious manner. To show forth, to proclaim. To show up, to expose. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. To present to the view; to enable to see or perceive; to teach or inform; to prove; to manifest; to point out; to bestow. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To appear; to be in appearance; to make known. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. To present to view; to make or enable to see or know; to reveal; to give proof of; to publish; to teach, instruct, or inform; to point out; to confer or bestow; to afford; to appear or be in appearance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  54. A sight or spectacle; something exhibited for money; superficial appearance; ostentatious display; hypocritical pretence; public appearance. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  55. To exhibit or present to view; to place in sight; to display; the thing exhibited being the object, and often with an indirect object denoting the person or thing seeing or beholding; as, to show a house; show your colors; shopkeepers show customers goods (show goods to customers). dictgcide_fs
  56. sh[=o], v.t. to present to view: to enable to perceive or know: to inform: to teach: to guide: to prove: to explain: to bestow.--v.i. to appear, come into sight: to look:--pa.p. sh[=o]wn or sh[=o]wed.--n. act of showing: display: a sight or spectacle: parade: appearance: plausibility, pretence: a sign, indication.--ns. SHOW'-BILL, a bill for showing or advertising the price, merits, &c. of goods; SHOW'-BOX, a showman's box out of which he takes his materials; SHOW'BREAD, among the Jews, the twelve loaves of bread shown or presented before Jehovah in the sanctuary; SHOW'-CARD, a placard with an announcement: a card of patterns; SHOW'-CASE, a case with glass sides in which articles are exhibited in a museum, &c.; SHOW'-END, that end of a piece of cloth which is on the outside of the roll for exhibition to customers; SHOW'ER; SHOW'ING, appearance: a setting forth, representation; SHOW'MAN, one who exhibits shows; SHOW'-PLACE, a place for exhibition: a gymnasium: (Shak.) a place where shows are exhibited; SHOW'-ROOM, a room where a show is exhibited: a room in a warehouse, &c., where goods are displayed to the best advantage, a room in a commercial hotel where travellers' samples are exhibited.--SHOW A LEG (vul.), to get out of bed; SHOW FIGHT, to show a readiness to resist; SHOW FORTH, to give out, proclaim; SHOW OFF, to display ostentatiously; SHOW OF HANDS, a raising of hands at a meeting to show approval of any proposal; SHOW ONE'S HAND (see HAND); SHOW ONE THE DOOR, to dismiss a person from one's house or presence; SHOW UP, to expose to blame or ridicule. [A.S. scéawian; Dut. schouwen, Ger. schauen, to behold.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  57. The discharge of blood premonitory of labor or menstruation. na
  58. (p.p. -n, rarelyed). Let be seen, disclose, manifest, offer (thing, person thing, thing to person) for inspection, exhibit, produce, give (treatment, person treatment, treatment to person), reveal, (clothes s. signs of wear; an aperture shows the inside; showed neither joy nor anger, that he was annoyed, how much he felt it, &c.; s. oneself, be seen in public; s. me, I was shown, a specimen; s. your tickets, please; got prizes for all the dogs he showed; s. cause; s. favour, mercy, to; showed me kindness or unkindness; s. fight, not yield tamely; s. one\'s colour s; s. one\'s hand orig. in cards, let out one\'s designs; s. the hoof or cloven hoof, see cleave; s. white feather; s. clean pair of heels; s. a leg, get out of bed; s. thing the fire, slightly heat it); be visible or noticeable, come into sight, appear in public, have some appearance, (the blood shows through her skin; stain will never s.; buds are just showing; her husband never shows at her at-homes colloq.; shows white, like a disk, from here); demonstrate, prove, expound, point out, cause (person) to understand (thing), (has shown the falsity of the tale, that it is false, how false it is, it to be false; s. one the way, by words, pointing, or going with or before him, also encourage by doing thing first; s. person how to write, what to do, &c.; s. person the door; it only shows how little you know; on your own showing, even according to your own admission or contention); conduct (showed us round the house; s. one out or in, esp. open door for his exit or entrance); s. forth archaic, exhibit, expound; s. off trans., display to advantage, intr., try to make impression by exhibiting one\'s wealth or skill; s. up, make or be conspicuous or clearly visible, expose (fraud, impostor); shew-bread, twelve loaves displayed in Jewish temple& renewed each sabbath; show-case, glazed case for exhibiting goods, curiosities, &c.; showroom, -window, in which wares are kept, hung up, for inspection; s.-place, that tourists &c. go to see. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. Showing (voted by s. of hands; dumb s.); spectacle, exhibition, pageant, display, collection of things shown esp. for money to entertain, (flower, horse, &c., -s.; Lord Mayor\'s s., procession of symbolic cars &c.; a fine s. of blossom); outward appearance, semblance, impression produced, parade, ostentation, pomp, display, (pierce beneath the ss. of things; there is a s. of reason in it; good enough in outward s.; did it for s.; is fond of s.; S. Sunday, that before Commemoration at Oxford), whence showy a., showly adv., showiness n.; (slang) concern, undertaking, organization, (run or boss the s.; give away the s., betray its inadequacy or pretentiousness); (slang) opportunity of acting, defending oneself, &c. (had no s. at all; give him a fair s.); (Obstetr.) discharge indicating approach of labour; showman, proprietor or manager of menagerie or other such s. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Appearance of blood forerunning labor or menstruation. American pocket medical dictionary.
  61. An appearance. A colloquial term for the first discharge of blood in menstruation or in labor. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  62. n. Act of showing or bringing to view; appearance; exhibition;—that which is shown or brought to view; a spectacle;—proud or ostentatious display; parade; pomp;— semblance; likeness; appearance;— pretext; specious;-plausibility; representation; theatrical action;—dramatic exhibition. Show of hands, vote taken at a public meeting by raising hands for or against a motion, candidate, &c. Cabinet Dictionary

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