Spellcheck.net

Definitions of field

  1. a place where planes take off and land Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a particular environment or walk of life; "his social sphere is limited"; "it was a closed area of employment"; "he's out of my orbit" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a piece of land prepared for playing a game; "the home crowd cheered when Princeton took the field" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a region where a battle is being (or has been) fought; "they made a tour of Civil War battlefields" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. extensive tract of level open land; "they emerged from the woods onto a vast open plain"; "he longed for the fields of his youth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. catch or pick up (balls) in baseball or cricket Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a particular kind of commercial enterprise; "they are outstanding in their field" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the area that is visible (as through an optical instrument) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. all the competitors in a particular contest or sporting event Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. (horse racing) all of the horses in a particular race Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. (mathematics) a set of elements such that addition and multiplication are commutative and associative and multiplication is distributive over addition and there are two elements 0 and 1; "the set of all rational numbers is a field" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. (computer science) a set of one or more adjacent characters comprising a unit of information Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. somewhere (away from a studio or office or library or laboratory) where practical work is done or data is collected; "anthropologists do much of their work in the field" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. the space around a radiating body within which its electromagnetic oscillations can exert force on another similar body not in contact with it Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. all of the horses in a particular horse race Wordnet Dictionary DB
  17. a region in which active military operations are in progress; "the army was in the field awaiting action"; "he served in the Vietnam theater for three years" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. a piece of land cleared of trees and usually enclosed; "he planted a field of wheat" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. a geographic region (land or sea) under which something valuable is found; "the diamond fields of South Africa" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. select (a team or individual player) for a game; "The Patriots fielded a young new quarterback for the Rose Bowl" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. answer adequately or successfully; "The lawyer fielded all questions from the press" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. play as a fielder Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture; cultivated ground; the open country. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A piece of land of considerable size; esp., a piece inclosed for tillage or pasture. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A place where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. An open space; an extent; an expanse. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Any blank space or ground on which figures are drawn or projected. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The space covered by an optical instrument at one view. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The whole surface of an escutcheon; also, so much of it is shown unconcealed by the different bearings upon it. See Illust. of Fess, where the field is represented as gules (red), while the fess is argent (silver). Webster Dictionary DB
  30. An unresticted or favorable opportunity for action, operation, or achievement; province; room. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A collective term for all the competitors in any outdoor contest or trial, or for all except the favorites in the betting. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To take the field. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To stand out in the field, ready to catch, stop, or throw the ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To catch, stop, throw, etc. (the ball), as a fielder. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. That part of the grounds reserved for the players which is outside of the diamond; - called also outfield. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture; open country; a region yielding some natural product; a region yielding some natural product; site of a battle; sphere of action; a wide expanse; space within which telescopic or microscopic objects are viewed; outdoor work; in heraldry, the surface of the shleld; the ground upon which a game is played. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  37. To catch or stop and return to the wicket-keeper, as a ball at cricket, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  38. To act as a fielder in baseball or cricket. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  39. A definite area or plane surface, considered in relation to some specific object. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  40. Country or open country in general; a piece of ground inclosed for tillage or pasture; the locality of a battle; the battle itself; room for action of any kind; a wide expanse; (her.) the surface of a shield; the background on which figures are drawn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. To take to the field; in cricket and base-ball, to be one of the field whose duty is to watch the ball as it is driven by the batsman, and endeavor to put him out either by catching it before it reach the ground, or by recovering it rapidly and returning it to the infield. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  42. In cricket and base-ball, to catch or stop and return to the infield; as, to field a ball. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Open ground; inclosed land; place of a battle; battle; space for action; expanse. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. A large piece of land enclosed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A region; open expanse; the open country. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A sphere of action; battle - ground; battle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A piece of land inclosed for tillage or pasture; the open country; the locality of a battle; a battle; wide expanse; room for action or operation; the ground or blank space on which figures are drawn; the whole surface of a shield; the body of fielders. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. To catch the ball. A field of ice, a large body of floating ice. Field of view, in a telescope or microscope, the space within which objects are visible when the instrument is adjusted to its focus. To keep the field, to remain out of garrison, or to keep ready for action. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  49. A piece of land enclosed for tillage; the open country; a battle-ground; room; space; in her., the surface of the shield; the blank space on which figures are drawn or projected; the entire space within which objects are seen by a telescope or microscope. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  50. a dynamic system in which all the parts are interrelated and in equilibrium, so that a change in any part affects the whole. na
  51. The Hebrew sadeh is applied to any cultivated ground, and in some instances in marked opposition to the neighboring wilderness. On the other hand the sadeh is frequently contrasted with what is enclosed, whether a vineyard, a garden or a walled town. In many passages the term implies what is remote from a house, ( Genesis 4:8 ; 24:63 ; 22:25 ) or settled habitation, as in the case of Esau. ( Genesis 25:27 ) The separate plots of ground were marked off by stones, which might easily be removed, ( 19:14 ; 27:17 ) cf. Job 24:2; Prov 22:28; 23:10 the absence of fences rendered the fields liable to damage from straying cattle, ( Exodus 22:5 ) or fire, ( Exodus 22:6 ; 2 Samuel 14:30 ) hence the necessity of constantly watching flocks and herds. From the absence of enclosures, cultivated land of any size might be termed a field. [E] indicates this entry was also found in Easton's Bible Dictionary biblestudytools.com
  52. This term might well be considered as definite and certain a description as"close," and might be used In law; but it is not a usual description in legal proceed ings.1 Chit Gen. Pr. 160. thelawdictionary.org
  53. That part of the grounds reserved for the players which is outside of the diamond; -- called also outfield. mso.anu.edu.au
  54. (Heb. sadeh), a cultivated field, but unenclosed. It is applied to any cultivated ground or pasture ( Genesis 29:2 ; 31:4 ; 34:7 ), or tillage ( Genesis 37:7 ; 47:24 ). It is also applied to woodland ( Psalms 132:6 ) or mountain top ( Judges 9:32 Judges 9:36 ; 2 Sam 1:21 ). It denotes sometimes a cultivated region as opposed to the wilderness ( Genesis 33:19 ; 36:35 ). Unwalled villages or scattered houses are spoken of as "in the fields" ( Deuteronomy 28:3 Deuteronomy 28:16 ; Leviticus 25:31 ; Mark 6:36 Mark 6:56 ). The "open field" is a place remote from a house ( Genesis 4:8 ; Leviticus 14:7 Leviticus 14:53 ; 17:5 ). Cultivated land of any extent was called a field ( Genesis 23:13 Genesis 23:17 ; 41:8 ; Leviticus 27:16 ; Ruth 4:5 ; Nehemiah 12:29 ). biblestudytools.com
  55. A part of a farra separately enclosed; a close. 1 Chit. Pr. 160. The Digest defines a field to be a piece of land without a house; ager est locus, que sine villa est. Dig. 50, 16, 27. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  56. An area of a database record, orgraphical user interface form, into which a particularitem of data is entered.Example usage: "The telephone number field is not really anumerical field", "Why do we need a four-digit field for theyear?".A database column is the set of all instances of a givenfield from all records in a table. foldoc_fs
  57. f[=e]ld, n. country or open country in general: a piece of ground enclosed for tillage or pasture: the range of any series of actions or energies: the locality of a battle: the battle itself: room for action of any kind: a wide expanse: (her.) the surface of a shield: the background on which figures are drawn: the part of a coin left unoccupied by the main device: those taking part in a hunt: all the entries collectively against which a single contestant has to compete: all the parties not individually excepted, as 'to bet on the field' in a horse-race.--v.t. at cricket and base-ball, to catch or stop and return to the fixed place.--v.i. to stand in positions so as to catch the ball easily in cricket.--ns. FIELD'-ALLOW'ANCE, a small extra payment to officers on active service; FIELD'-ARTILL'ERY, light ordnance suited for active operations in the field; FIELD'-BED, a camp or trestle bedstead; FIELD'-BOOK, a book used in surveying fields.--n.pl. FIELD'-COL'OURS, small flags used for marking the position for companies and regiments, also any regimental headquarters' flags.--n. FIELD'-DAY, a day when troops are drawn out for instruction in field exercises: any day of unusual bustle.--adj. FIELD'ED (Shak.), encamped.--ns. FIELD'ER, one who fields; FIELD'FARE, a species of thrush, having a reddish-yellow throat and breast spotted with black; FIELD'-GLASS, a binocular telescope slung over the shoulder in a case; FIELD'-GUN, a light cannon mounted on a carriage; FIELD'-HAND, an outdoor farm labourer; FIELD'-HOS'PITAL, a temporary hospital near the scene of battle; FIELD'-ICE, ice formed in the polar seas in large surfaces, distinguished from icebergs; FIELD'ING, the acting in the field at cricket as distinguished from batting; FIELD'-MAR'SHAL, an officer of the highest rank in the army; FIELD'-MEET'ING, a conventicle; FIELD'-MOUSE, a species of mouse that lives in the fields; FIELD'-NIGHT, a night marked by some important gathering, discussion, &c.; FIELD'-OFF'ICER, a military officer above the rank of captain, and below that of general; FIELD'PIECE, a cannon or piece of artillery used in the field of battle; FIELD'-PREACH'ER, one who preaches in the open air; FIELD'-PREACH'ING; FIELDS'MAN, a fielder.--n.pl. FIELD'-SPORTS, sports of the field, as hunting, racing, &c.--n. FIELD'-TRAIN, a department of the Royal Artillery responsible for the safety and supply of ammunition during war.--advs. FIELD'WARD, -WARDS, toward the fields.--n.pl. FIELD'WORKS, temporary works thrown up by troops in the field, either for protection or to cover an attack upon a stronghold.--FIELD OF VISION, the compass of visual power.--KEEP THE FIELD, to keep the campaign open: to maintain one's ground. [A.S. feld; cf. Dut. veld, the open country, Ger. feld.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  58. [Latin] The area or portion of space within the limits of which an apparatus, function, or sense is capable of operating. F. of vision (Visual f.), the portion of space containing all the points that are visible to an eye remaining fixed in one position. F. of fixation, that portion of space comprising all points that the eye can look straight at, if turned in all possible directions, the head remaining still. Auditory f., the portion of space within which a sonorous body can be heard. F. of a microscope, the area visible at one time through the microscope. Magnetic f., the portion of space within which the attraction of a magnet is sensibly appreciable. na
  59. (Piece of) ground, esp. one used for pasture or tillage, & usu. bounded by hedges &c.; tract abounding in some natural product (diamond, coal, &c., -f.); ground on which battle is fought (often battle-f.; also fig., left his rival in possession of the f.; FAIR f. & no favour; hold the f., not be superseded); scene of campaign (in the f., campaigning; take, keep, the f., begin, continue, campaign); battle (hard-fought, stricken, f.); ground for playing cricket, football, &c.; players, partakers, in cricket, football, &c.; players, partakers, in outdoor contest or sport; all competitors or all except the favourite (a good f., many& good competitors); (Cricket) side not batting, one of this side (see also LONG f.); large stretch, expanse, of sea, sky, ice, snow, &c., also fig. (the whole f. of history); (Herald.) surface of escutcheon or of one of its divisions; ground work of picture, coin, flag, &c.; area or sphere of operation, observation, &c. (each supreme in his own f.; filled the f. of the telescope; wide f. of vision; outside the magnetic f., not near enough to be attracted); (attrib. in names of animals &c.) found in the open country (f.-mouse, f.-ash); f.-allowance, to officer on campaign to meet increased expenditure; f.-artillery, -battery, -gun or -piece, light& mobile for use on campaign& in battle; f.-cornet, magistrate of township in Cape Colony &c.; f.-day, (Mil.) manaeuvring -exercise or review, (flg.) great occasion, important debate; f.-dressing, appliances for wound in battle; f.-glass, binocular telescope for outdoor use, one of the lenses of astronomical telescope or compound microscope; f.-hospital, ambulance, temporary hospital near battlefield; French. -marshal, general officer of highest rank; f.-night, =f.-day (fig. sense); f.-officer, above captain& below general; f.-preachering, in open air; fieldsman, fielder at cricket; f.-sports, outdoor, esp. hunting, shooting, fishing; f.-telegraph, inovable for use on campaign; f.-work, temporary fortification; hence fieldward (s) adv. (Vb) act as fieldsman in cricket, base-ball, or rounders; stop (& return) ball; hence fielder n. [West German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. Any definite circumscribed area. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  61. [A.S.] (Her.) The whole surface of an escutcheon. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  62. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German] Cleared land;—any part of a farm inclosed for tillage or pasture;—ground not inclosed; the country;—a cleared space or plain where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself;—an open space of any kind; a wide extent; an expanse;- the surface of the shield; hence, any blank space or ground on which figures are drawn or projected. Cabinet Dictionary
  63. Ground not inhabited, not built on; cultivated tract of ground; the open country, opposed to quarters; the ground of battle; the ground occupied by an army; a wide expanse ; space, compass, extent; in heraldry, the surface of a field. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for field?

X