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Definitions of turn

  1. a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program; "he did his act three times every evening"; "she had a catchy little routine"; "it was one of the best numbers he ever did" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. undergo a change or development; "The water turned into ice"; "Her former friend became her worst enemy"; "He turned traitor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a circular segment of a curve; "a bend in the road"; "a crook in the path" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. have recourse to or make an appeal or request for help or information to; "She called on her Representative to help her"; "She turned to her relatives for help" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. change to the contrary; "The trend was reversed"; "the tides turned against him"; "public opinion turned when it was revealed that the president had an affair with a White House intern" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. go sour or spoil; "The milk has soured"; "The wine worked"; "The cream has turned--we have to throw it out" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a time for working (after which you will be relieved by someone else); "it's my go"; "a spell of work" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a favor for someone; "he did me a good turn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. pass into a condition gradually, take on a specific property or attribute; become;"The weather turned nasty"; "She grew angry"; "The teacher became impatient" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. pass to the other side of; "turn the corner"; "move around the obstacle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the activity of doing something in an agreed succession; "it is my turn"; "it is still my play" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. twist suddenly so as to sprain; "wrench one's ankle"; "The wrestler twisted his shoulder"; "the hikers sprained their ankles when they fell"; "I turned my ankle and couldn't walk for several days" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. cause to change or turn into something different;assume new characteristics; "The princess turned the frog into a prince by kissing him"; "The alchemists tried to turn lead into gold" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. taking a short walk out and back; "we took a turn in the park" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. turning or twisting around (in place); "with a quick twist of his head he surveyed the room" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. turning away or in the opposite direction; "he made an abrupt turn away from her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. the act of changing or reversing the direction of the course; "he took a turn to the right" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a movement in a new direction; "the turning of the wind" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. an unforeseen development; "events suddenly took an awkward turn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. cause to move around a center so as to show another side of; "turn a page of a book" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. (sports) a period of play during which one team is on the offensive Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. pass into a condition gradually, take on a specific property or attribute; become; "The weather turned nasty"; "She grew angry" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. become officially one year older; "She is turning 50 this year" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. change color; "In Vermont, the leaves turn early" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. direct at someone; "She turned a smile on me"; "They turned their flashlights on the car" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. alter the functioning or setting of; "turn the dial to 10"; "turn the heat down" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form; "bend the rod"; "twist the dough into a braid"; "the strong man could turn an iron bar" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. let (something) fall or spill a container; "turn the flour onto a plate" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  30. shape by rotating on a lathe or cutting device or a wheel; "turn the legs of the table"; "turn the clay on the wheel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. to break and turn over earth especially with a plow; "Farmer Jones plowed his east field last week"; "turn the earth in the Spring" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. change orientation or direction, also in the abstract sense; "Turn towards me"; "The mugger turned and fled before I could see his face"; "She turned from herself and learned to listen to others' needs" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. channel one's attention, interest, thought, or attention toward or away from something; "The pedophile turned to boys for satisfaction"; "people turn to mysticism at the turn of a millenium" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. to send or let go; "They turned away the crowd at the gate of the governor's mansion" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. cause to move around or rotate; "turn a key"; "turn your palm this way" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. cause to move along an axis or into a new direction; "turn your face to the wall"; "turn the car around"; "turn your dance partner around" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. move around an axis or a center; "The wheels are turning" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. get by buying and selling; "the company turned a good profit after a year" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. accomplish by rotating; "turn a somersault"; "turn cartwheels" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  40. To make a turn about or around (something); to go or pass around by turning; as, to turn a corner. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To cause to move upon a center, or as if upon a center; to give circular motion to; to cause to revolve; to cause to move round, either partially, wholly, or repeatedly; to make to change position so as to present other sides in given directions; to make to face otherwise; as, to turn a wheel or a spindle; to turn the body or the head. Newage Dictionary DB
  42. To cause to present a different side uppermost or outmost; to make the upper side the lower, or the inside to be the outside of; to reverse the position of; as, to turn a box or a board; to turn a coat. Newage Dictionary DB
  43. To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; -- used both literally and figuratively; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn a horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to turn the attention to or from something. Newage Dictionary DB
  44. To change from a given use or office; to divert, as to another purpose or end; to transfer; to use or employ; to apply; to devote. Newage Dictionary DB
  45. To change the form, quality, aspect, or effect of; to alter; to metamorphose; to convert; to transform; -- often with to or into before the word denoting the effect or product of the change; as, to turn a worm into a winged insect; to turn green to blue; to turn prose into verse; to turn a Whig to a Tory, or a Hindu to a Christian; to turn good to evil, and the like. Newage Dictionary DB
  46. To form in a lathe; to shape or fashion (anything) by applying a cutting tool to it while revolving; as, to turn the legs of stools or tables; to turn ivory or metal. Newage Dictionary DB
  47. Hence, to give form to; to shape; to mold; to put in proper condition; to adapt. Newage Dictionary DB
  48. To translate; to construe; as, to turn the Iliad. Newage Dictionary DB
  49. To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle, etc.: as, to turn cider or wine; electricity turns milk quickly. Newage Dictionary DB
  50. To sicken; to nauseate; as, an emetic turns one's stomach. Newage Dictionary DB
  51. To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man turns on his heel. Newage Dictionary DB
  52. Hence, to revolve as if upon a point of support; to hinge; to depend; as, the decision turns on a single fact. Newage Dictionary DB
  53. To result or terminate; to come about; to eventuate; to issue. Newage Dictionary DB
  54. To be deflected; to take a different direction or tendency; to be directed otherwise; to be differently applied; to be transferred; as, to turn from the road. Newage Dictionary DB
  55. To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another; to turn Mohammedan. Newage Dictionary DB
  56. To undergo the process of turning on a lathe; as, ivory turns well. Newage Dictionary DB
  57. To become acid; to sour; -- said of milk, ale, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  58. To become giddy; -- said of the head or brain. Newage Dictionary DB
  59. To be nauseated; -- said of the stomach. Newage Dictionary DB
  60. To become inclined in the other direction; -- said of scales. Newage Dictionary DB
  61. To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; -- said of the tide. Newage Dictionary DB
  62. To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery. Newage Dictionary DB
  63. To invert a type of the same thickness, as temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted. Newage Dictionary DB
  64. The act of turning; movement or motion about, or as if about, a center or axis; revolution; as, the turn of a wheel. Newage Dictionary DB
  65. Change of direction, course, or tendency; different order, position, or aspect of affairs; alteration; vicissitude; as, the turn of the tide. Newage Dictionary DB
  66. One of the successive portions of a course, or of a series of occurrences, reckoning from change to change; hence, a winding; a bend; a meander. Newage Dictionary DB
  67. A circuitous walk, or a walk to and fro, ending where it began; a short walk; a stroll. Newage Dictionary DB
  68. Successive course; opportunity enjoyed by alternation with another or with others, or in due order; due chance; alternate or incidental occasion; appropriate time. Newage Dictionary DB
  69. Incidental or opportune deed or office; occasional act of kindness or malice; as, to do one an ill turn. Newage Dictionary DB
  70. Convenience; occasion; purpose; exigence; as, this will not serve his turn. Newage Dictionary DB
  71. Form; cast; shape; manner; fashion; -- used in a literal or figurative sense; hence, form of expression; mode of signifying; as, the turn of thought; a man of a sprightly turn in conversation. Newage Dictionary DB
  72. A change of condition; especially, a sudden or recurring symptom of illness, as a nervous shock, or fainting spell; as, a bad turn. Newage Dictionary DB
  73. A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; -- so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given. Newage Dictionary DB
  74. A round of a rope or cord in order to secure it, as about a pin or a cleat. Newage Dictionary DB
  75. A pit sunk in some part of a drift. Newage Dictionary DB
  76. A court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county. Newage Dictionary DB
  77. Monthly courses; menses. Newage Dictionary DB
  78. An embellishment or grace (marked thus, /), commonly consisting of the principal note, or that on which the turn is made, with the note above, and the semitone below, the note above being sounded first, the principal note next, and the semitone below last, the three being performed quickly, as a triplet preceding the marked note. The turn may be inverted so as to begin with the lower note, in which case the sign is either placed on end thus /, or drawn thus /. Newage Dictionary DB
  79. To make to revolve or go round, as a wheel; to do by means of a revolving motion, as a handspring; to change the direction or position of; to change from one state to another, as milk into butter; upset; as, success has turned her head; to cause to become; to nauseate; to guide or direct; to give into the hands of another; with over; to bend or fold up, down, or over, as the leaf of a book; to go around; as to turn a corner; to shape in circular form, as by holding a revolving piece of wood against a sharp edge , or lathe; hence , to make or mold; as, he turns many a pretty compliment; to revolve in the mind; as, he turned the plan in every direction; to ponder; translate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  80. To have a circular motion; revolve; become; be changed; to start in especially to revolt; to depend; as, my action turns on yours; to incline to one side or the other; said of scales; hinge; to change from ebb to flow or from flow to ebb; said of the tide; to become spoiled, acid, or sour, as milk; to be nauseated, as the stomach; to become dizzy; as, my head turns; to result. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  81. The act of revolving; circular motion, as of a wheel; a bend or curve; as, a turn of the road; change of direction; a good or evil act; as, to do a good turn; a single twist of a rope about a post; a critical change in the progress of a disease; colloquially, startling surprise or shock; a short walk for air and exercise; time for some act which one does in rotation with others; special purpose; tendency; bent; a charcacteristic growing out of a particular cast of mind, thought, etc.; a short stage piece or act. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  82. 1. To revolve or cause to revolve; specifically to change the position of the fetus in utero so as to convert a malpresentation into one permitting of normal delivery. 2. A change of position. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  83. To whirl round: to hinge: to depend: to issue: to take a different direction or tendency: to become by a change: to be turned in a lathe: to sour: to become giddy: to be nauseated: to change from ebb to flow or from flow to ebb: to become inclined in the other direction. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  84. To cause to revolve: to reverse: to change the position or the direction of: to make to nauseate, to make giddy: direct the mind to: infatuate or make mad: to cause to return with profit: to transfer: to convert: to form in a lathe: to shape. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  85. Act of turning: new direction, or tendency: a walk to and fro: change: a winding: a bend: from: manner: opportunity, convenience: act of kindness or malice. -TURNER. BY TURNS, one after another, alternately. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  86. Act of turning: new direction: change: act. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  87. To form in a lathe; cause to revolve; reverse; transfer; employ; convert. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  88. To revolve; move round; depend; issue; bechanged; sour. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  89. To move or go round; revolve; rotate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  90. To change; alter. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  91. To shape in a lathe; round. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  92. To give or take a new direction; reverse; incline; bend. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  93. The act of turning; a change; variation; rotation; revolution. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  94. A round; spell. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  95. Shape or form; mold; disposition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  96. An embellishment formed by playing a note and the accessory notes above and below it. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  97. The act of turning; a revolution; a winding; a bend or bending; a walk to and fro; change; change of direction; chance; hap; incidental opportunity; form, shape or manner; act of kindness or malice; new position of things; a pit sunk in some part of a drift. By turns, alternately. To take turns, to take each other's places alternately. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  98. To cause to move in a circular course; to change or shift sides; to change or transform; to metamorphose; to put upside down to alter position, as the posture of the body; to form on a lathe; to shape; to translate; to transfer; to cause to nauseate; to make giddy; to infatuate; to direct; to revolve; to move from a direct course or straight line; to cause to deviate; to reverse; to make acid; to sour, as wines; to dissuade from a purpose or cause to change sides. To turn aside, to avert. To turn away, to dismiss; to avert. To turn down, to fold or double down. To turn in, to fold or double. To turn off, to dismis contemptuously; to deflect. To be turned to be advanced beyond. To turn out, to expel; to put forth. To turn over, to change sides; to transfer; to overset. To turn to, to have recourse to. To turn upon, to retort. To turn the back, to flee. To turn the back upon, to quit with contempt; to for sake. To turn the die, to change fortune. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  99. To move round; to have a circular motion; to be directed; to move the body round; to move; to revolve; to deviate; to be changed; to change; to become giddy; to change a course of life; to repent. To turn about, to move the face to another quarter. To turn away, to deviate. To turn in, to bend inward; to go to bed. To turn off, to deviate from a course. To turn on, to reply or retort. To turn out, to move from its place; to rise from bed; to prove in the result. To turn over, to turn from side to side; to tumble; to change sides. To turn to, to be directed. To turn under, to bend or be folded downward. To turn up, to bend or be doubled upward. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  100. To cause to go round; to move round; to move from a direct course or straight line; to change the direction of; to change or alter; to reverse; to put the upper side downwards; to form or shape, as by means of a lathe; to translate, as from one language to another; to transform; to cause to loathe; to bewilder or make mad, as, it has turned his brain; to expel, as, to turn him out of doors; to direct, as the inclination or thoughts; to cause to change, as a party or principle; to change, as a course of life; to revolve in the mind; to make sour, as a liquor. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  101. A movement in a circular direction; a bend, as in a road; the twist of a rope round a dent or belaying-pin; a walk to and fro; a change; change of direction; opportunity; convenience, use, or purpose; that which comes to one by rotation or in the course of duty; a good or evil act; form or cast, as the turn of a sentence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  102. To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; used both literally and figuratively; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn a horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to turn the attention to or from something. dictgcide_fs
  103. To change the form, quality, aspect, or effect of; to alter; to metamorphose; to convert; to transform; often with to or into before the word denoting the effect or product of the change; as, to turn a worm into a winged insect; to turn green to blue; to turn prose into verse; to turn a Whig to a Tory, or a Hindu to a Christian; to turn good to evil, and the like. dictgcide_fs
  104. To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another; to turn Muslim. dictgcide_fs
  105. To become acid; to sour; said of milk, ale, etc. dictgcide_fs
  106. To become giddy; said of the head or brain. dictgcide_fs
  107. To be nauseated; said of the stomach. dictgcide_fs
  108. To become inclined in the other direction; said of scales. dictgcide_fs
  109. To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; said of the tide. dictgcide_fs
  110. Form; cast; shape; manner; fashion; used in a literal or figurative sense; hence, form of expression; mode of signifying; as, the turn of thought; a man of a sprightly turn in conversation. dictgcide_fs
  111. A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given. dictgcide_fs
  112. An embellishment or grace (marked thus, dictgcide_fs
  113. turn, v.i. to whirl round: to hinge: to depend: to issue: to take a different direction or tendency: to become by a change, hence to rebel: to return: to be fickle: to result: to be shaped on the lathe: to sour: to become giddy: to be nauseated: to change from ebb to flow or from flow to ebb: to become inclined in the other direction.--v.t. to cause to revolve: to reverse: to pass round: to direct, apply: to send, drive: to fold, remake: to translate: to make sour: to change the position or the direction of: to nauseate, to make giddy: to direct the mind to: to infatuate or make mad: to cause to return with profit: to transfer: to convert: to form in a lathe: to shape: to round: to adapt: to blunt.--n. act of turning: new direction or tendency, disposition: a walk to and fro: chance: a turning-point, crisis: (mus.) a melodic embellishment, consisting of a principal tone with two auxiliary tones lying respectively next above and below it: a spell of work, a job: (coll.) a nervous shock: change: a winding: a bend: form: manner: opportunity, convenience: act of kindness or malice: a type turned upside down, owing to a temporary want of the proper letter.--ns. TURN'ABOUT, a merry-go-round; TURN'BACK, the strap from the hames to the hip-strap; TURN'BUCKLE, a form of coupling so arranged as to regulate the length or tension of the connected parts; TURN'-CAP, a chimney-cowl rotating on a vertical axis; TURN'COAT, one who turns his coat--that is, abandons his principles or party; TURN'COCK, one who turns on the water for the mains, regulates the fire-plugs, &c., of a water company.--adj. TURN'-DOWN, folded down.--ns. TURN'ER, one who, or that which, turns: a tumbler, gymnast, esp. a member of the German Turnvereine or gymnastic bodies, instituted by F. L. Jahn in 1811; TURN'ERY, art of turning or of shaping by a lathe: things made by a turner, also the place where these are made: ornamentation by means of the lathe; TURN'ING, a winding: deviation from the proper course: turnery, the art of shaping wood, metal, ivory, or other hard substances into forms having a curved (generally circular or oval) transverse section, and also of engraving figures composed of curved lines upon a smooth surface, by means of a turning-lathe: (mil.) a manoeuvre for turning an enemy's position: in pottery, the shaping of a vase: (pl.) chips; TURN'ING-LATHE, a lathe used by turners; TURN'ING-POINT, the point on which a question turns, and which decides the case: a grave and critical period; TURN'ING-REST, a support on a lathe serving as a fulcrum for a hand turning-tool; TURN'ING-SAW, a thin-bladed saw contrived for cutting curved wood for chair-backs, &c.--also Sweep-saw, Frame-saw, Scroll-saw; TURN'ING-STEEL, a piece of hard bar-steel for turning the edge of a tool, &c.; TURN'ING-TOOL, a tool for shaping the cutting edges of the tools used in seal-engraving; TURN'KEY, one who turns the keys in a prison: a warder; TURN'-OUT, the act of coming forth: a strike: a striker: a crowd of spectators: a carriage and its horses: quantity of produce yielded.--adj. TURN'OVER, made to be turned over or reversed.--n. act of turning over, upset, overthrow: a small pie made by turning half of the circular crust over the other which has been covered with fruit, &c.: an apprentice turned over to a new master to complete his apprenticeship: the total amount of the sales in a business for a specified time.--ns. TURN'PIKE, a gate set across a road to stop those liable to toll: a turnpike-road--originally a frame consisting of two cross-bars armed with pikes, and turning on a post; TURN'PIKE-MAN, a man who collects tolls at a tollgate; TURN'PIKE-ROAD, a road on which turnpikes or tollgates are established; TURN'-SCREW, a screw-driver; TURN'SKIN, a werewolf; TURN'SPIT, one who turns a spit: a person engaged in some menial occupation: a long-bodied, short-legged dog employed to drive a wheel by which roasting-spits were turned--closely allied to the Dachshund (q.v.); TURN'STILE, a revolving frame in a footpath which prevents the passage of cattle, but allows the passage of one person at a time; TURN'STILE-REG'ISTER, a device for recording the number of persons passing through a turnstile; TURN'STONE, a small grallatorial bird, intermediate between the true plovers and sandpipers, so called from its habit of turning over pebbles on the beach in search of food; TURN'-TA'BLE (same as TRAVERSE-TABLE); TURN'-UP, a disturbance: something that appears unexpectedly.--TURN ABOUT, to move the face or front to another quarter; TURN ABOUT, TURN AND TURN ABOUT, alternately; TURN A, or THE, CORNER (see CORNER); TURN A DEAF EAR TO, to ignore; TURN ADRIFT, to unmoor and let float away: to cast off; TURN AGAIN, to return: to make a stand; TURN AGAINST, to use to the injury of: to render hostile: to rebel against; TURN AN ENEMY'S FLANK, LINE, or POSITION, to manoeuvre so as to attack an enemy in the rear: to outwit; TURN A PENNY (see PENNY); TURN AROUND ONE'S FINGER, to make any one subservient to one's will; TURN ASIDE, to avert; to deviate: to avert the face; TURN AWAY, to dismiss from service, to discharge: to avert, to look in another direction: to deviate, to depart from; TURN BACK, to cause to retreat: to return; TURN DOWN, to double or fold down: to hide the face of: to lessen or lower; TURN FORTH, to expel; TURN IN, to bend inward: to enter: (coll.) to go to bed; TURN INTO, to become by a process of change; TURN OFF, to deviate: to dismiss: to divert: to complete, achieve by labour: to shut off: (slang) to hang; TURN ON, to set running (as water): to depend on: to confront in fight; TURN ONE'S HAND TO, to apply one's self; TURN ONE'S HEAD, or BRAIN, to make one giddy: to fill with pride or conceit; TURN OUT, to drive out, to expel: to put to pasture (as cattle): to make for market or for use: to project: to prove in the result: to muster: to leave one's work to take part in a strike: (coll.) to get out of bed; TURN OVER, to roll over: to change sides: to sell goods to the amount of: to examine by turning the leaves; TURN ROUND, to reverse one's position or party; TURN THE BACK, to flee, to retreat; TURN THE BACK UPON, to quit with contempt, to forsake; TURN THE EDGE OF, to blunt; TURN THE SCALE, to decide, determine; TURN THE STOMACH, to nauseate; TURN TO, to have recourse to: to point to: to result in; TURN TURTLE (see TURTLE); TURN UP, to point upwards: to appear, happen: place with face up: to bring the point uppermost: to refer to in a book; TURN UPON, to cast back upon, retort; TURN UPSIDE DOWN, to throw into complete confusion.--BE TURNED OF, to have advanced beyond--of age; BY TURNS, one after another: at intervals; ILL TURN, an injurious act: a change for the worse; IN TURN, in order of succession; NOT TO TURN A HAIR, to be quite undisturbed or unaffected; ON THE TURN, at the turning-point, changing; SERVE A TURN, to answer the purpose; TAKE ONE'S TURN, to occupy one's allotted place; TAKE TURNS, to take each the other's place alternately; TO A TURN, exactly, perfectly. [A.S. tyrnan; Ger. turnen; Fr. tourner; all from L. torn[=a]re, to turn in a lathe--tornus, a turner's wheel--Gr. tornos.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  114. Move (t. & i.) on or as on axis, give rotary motion to, receive such motion, as crank turns wheel, wheel turns, t. the key in the lock, t. the tap, tap will not t., he turned on his heel (s), t. person round one\'s FINGER, everything turns (depends) on his answer; execute (somer-sault &c.) with rotary motion; change from one side to another, invert, reverse, (fig.) revolve mentally, as turns everything upside down or inside out (into state of confusion), whole world has turned topsy-turvy, umbrella turns inside out, turned the body with its face upwards, turned (inverted) comma, turned period (\'), t. TURTLE, t. the Tables on, t. over pages of book (to read on other side), t. over new LEAF, not t. a HAIR, dress must be turned (the soiled outside becoming the inside), t. one\'s COAT, have turned the matter over& over in my mind; give new direction to, take new direction, adapt, be adapted, as t. your face this way, (Mil.) left, right, t., change front to left, right, river turns to the right, turned his flight northwards, scarcely know where or which way to t. (fig. what course to follow, where to seek help), turned to God in her trouble, t. one\'s BACK on, t. a DEAF ear to, t. the edge of (knife &c., fig. remark &c.), blunt, t. your attention to this, have often turned my thoughts, thoughts have often turned, to the subject, can t. his hand to (learn to do) any thing, turns even his errors to account (profits by them), all turns (tends) to his profit, tide turns (at ebb or flow); move to other side of, go round, flank, as t. the CORNER. t. the scale, cause it to sink, fig. decide question in suspense, t. (the flank or position of) an army, pass round so as to attack it from flank or rear, t. persons flank, out-wit him, defeat him in argument &c.; be turned (have passed the age) (of) 40 &c.; cause to go, send, put, as was turned adrift in the world, t. it out into a basin, never turned (away) a beggar from his door; change (t. & i.) in nature, form, condition, &c., change for the worse, (cause to) become, as turned water into wine, has been turned into a joint stock company, fear he will t. crusty, has turned traitor, Mohammedan, botanist, joy is or has turned to bitterness, t. (translate) it into French, how would you t. this passage?, milk will t. (sour), thunder will t. milk (sour), turned pale at the thought, very thought turns me pale, sight of raw meat turns (nauseates) my stomach, stomach turns at the sight, success has turned his head (intoxicated him), head has turned with success, head turns (with giddiness), overwork has turned his brain; shape (object) in lathe, (of material) lend itself (easily, well, &c.) to treatment in lathe; give (esp. elegant) form to, as can t. a compliment, could t. a Latin verse in my day, welt-turned phrase, exquisitely-turned wrist. Spec. uses with advv. & prepp.: T. about, t. so as to face in new direction. T. against, become hostile to. T. down: fold down; place (playing-card) face downwards; reduce flame of (gas, lamp, &c.) by turning tap &c. T. in; fold inwards; incline in wards, as his toes t. in; (colloq.) go to bed. T. off: check passage of (water, gas, &c.) by means of tap &c.; achieve, produce, (epigram, piece of work); dismiss (servant &c.) from employment; (slang) hang (criminal), marry (couple). T. on (adv.): give free passage to (water &c.) by turning tap; (colloq.) give free scope to, as t. on the waterworks, begin to cry. T. on (prep.): depend upon; face hostilely, become hostile to. T. out: expel; cause to point or incline out wards, as t. out your toes; produce (manufactured goods &c.); t. inside out, bring to view, as made him t. out his pockets; assemble for duty &c., as 15 men turned out; be found, prove to be the case, as this turns out to be true, he turned out a humbug, it turns out that he was never there, we shall see how things t. out. T. over: cause to fall over, upset; transfer the conduct of (thing to person); do business to the amount of, as turns over 500 a week. T. round: face about; adopt new opinions or policy. T. to (prep.), apply oneself to, set about, (work, doing). T. to (adv.), begin work. T. up: (Cards) expose (trump card); disinter, as plough turns up skulls; make one\'s appearance, as turned up an hour late, unexpectedly; (of event, opportunity, &c.) happen, present itself; (colloq.) cause to vomit, as the sight turned me up. T. upon, = t. on. T. -bench, watchmakers portable lathe; t.-buckle, device for connecting parts of metal rod; t.-cap, revolving chimney-top; turn-coat, one who turns his COAT; turncock, person employed to t. on water for mains &c.; t.-down, (of collar) doubled down; turnkey, person in charge of prison keys; t.-out, turning-out esp. for duty, strike of employees, assembly of persons to see spectacle &c., equipage, quantity of goods manufactured &c. in given time; turn-over, upsetting of carriage &c., semicircular pie or tart, amount of money turned over in business, newspaper article running on to second page; turnpike, (hist.) defensive frame of pikes, gate set across road to stop carts &c. till toll is paid, such road; t.-screw, screw-driver; turn-side, giddiness in dogs; turnsole, kinds of plant supposed to t. with the sun; turnspit, longbodied short-legged dog formerly used to t. spit; turnstile, post at entrance of building esp. where admission fee is charged with four horizontal arms that move round as person passes through; turnstone, bird allied to plover; t. -table, circular revolving platform for reversing locomotives &c.; t.-up (colloq.), commotion. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  115. Rotary motion, changed or change of direction or position or tendency, deflection, deflected part, bend, as a single t. of the handle, a t. of Fortune\'s wheel (change of luck), with a neat t. of the wrist, took a sudden t. to the left, complaint took a favourable t., milk is on the t. (just turning sour), tide is on the t. (turning), gave a new t. to the argument, path is full of tt. & twists, walked along a t. of the river; character, tendency, disposition, formation, as was of a humorous t., do not like the t. of the sentence, the t. of an ankle; short walk, stroll, drive, ride, or performance, as take a t. in the garden, on a bicycle, took at. of work, short tt. (songs, recitations, &c., in music hall &c.); opportunity, occasion, privilege, obligation, coming successively to each of several persons &c., as it is your t. to watch, it was now my t. to be angry, must not speak out of (before or after) your t., will hear you all in t. (succession), we dug by tt. (in rotation of individuals or groups), take tt., work &c. alternately, work t. & t. about (alternately), went hot& cold by tt.; did not serve my t. (purpose); did me a good, an ill, t. (service, disservice); (Mus.) kinds of grace consisting of principal tone with those above& below it; (pl.) menses; each round in coil of rope &c.; (Print.) inverted type as temporary substitute for missing letter, letter turned wrong side up; (colloq.) nervous shock, as gave me quite a t.; meat is done to a t. (enough& not too much). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  116. have a fine, pretty, &c., t. of speed &c., be able to go very fast &c. on occasion. Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for turn?

X