Spellcheck.net

Definitions of mark

  1. something that exactly succeeds in achieving its goal; "the new advertising campaign was a bell ringer"; "scored a bull's eye"; "hit the mark" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a symbol of disgrace or infamy; "And the Lord set a mark upon Cain"--Genesis Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. to accuse or condemn or openly or formally or brand as disgraceful; "He denounced the government action"; "She was stigmatized by society because she had a child out of wedlock" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a person who is gullible and easy to take advantage of Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. mark by some ceremony or observation; "We marked the anniversary of his death" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. marking consisting of crossing lines Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. remove from a list; "Cross the name of the dead person off the list" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. be a distinctive feature, attribute, or trait; sometimes in a very positive sense; "His modesty distinguishes him form his peers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the shortest of the four Gospels in the New Testament Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a number or letter indicating quality (especially of a student's performance); "she made good marks in algebra"; "grade A milk"; "what was your score on your homework?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. assign a grade or rank to, according to one's evaluation; "grade tests"; "score the SAT essays"; "mark homework" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. attach a tag or label to; "label these bottles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. the impression created by doing something unusual or extraordinary that people notice and remember; "it was in London that he made his mark"; "he left an indelible mark on the American theater" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. an indication of damage Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. a perceptible indication of something not immediately apparent (as a visible clue that something has happened); "he showed signs of strain"; "they welcomed the signs of spring" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. a reference point to shoot at; "his arrow hit the mark" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. a distinguishing symbol; "the owner's mark was on all the sheep" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. make small marks into the surface of; "score the clay before firing it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. mark with a scar; "The skin disease scarred his face permanently" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. insert punctuation marks into Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. Apostle and companion of Saint Peter; assumed to be the author of the second Gospel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. something that exactly succeeds in achieving its goal; "the new advertising campaign was a bell ringer"; "scored a bull's eye"; "hit the mark"; "the president's speech was a home run" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. a visible indication made on a surface; "some previous reader had covered the pages with dozens of marks"; "paw prints were everywhere" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. a written or printed symbol (as for punctuation); "his answer was just a punctuation mark" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. formerly the basic unit of money in Germany Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. make or leave a mark on; "mark the trail so that we can find our way back" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. put a check mark on or next to; "Please check each name on the list"; "tick off the items" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. designate as if by a mark; "This sign marks the border"; "He indicated where the border ended" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. make underscoring marks Wordnet Dictionary DB
  30. establish as the highest level or best performance; "set a record" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. notice or perceive; "She noted that someone was following her"; "mark my words" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. A license of reprisals. See Marque. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. An old weight and coin. See Marc. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. The unit of monetary account of the German Empire, equal to 23.8 cents of United States money; the equivalent of one hundred pfennigs. Also, a silver coin of this value. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. A visible sign or impression made or left upon anything; esp., a line, point, stamp, figure, or the like, drawn or impressed, so as to attract the attention and convey some information or intimation; a token; a trace. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A character or device put on an article of merchandise by the maker to show by whom it was made; a trade-mark. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. A character (usually a cross) made as a substitute for a signature by one who can not write. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A fixed object serving for guidance, as of a ship, a traveler, a surveyor, etc.; as, a seamark, a landmark. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A trace, dot, line, imprint, or discoloration, although not regarded as a token or sign; a scratch, scar, stain, etc.; as, this pencil makes a fine mark. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. An evidence of presence, agency, or influence; a significative token; a symptom; a trace; specifically, a permanent impression of one's activity or character. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. That toward which a missile is directed; a thing aimed at; what one seeks to hit or reach. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. Attention, regard, or respect. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. Limit or standard of action or fact; as, to be within the mark; to come up to the mark. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. Badge or sign of honor, rank, or official station. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. Preeminence; high position; as, particians of mark; a fellow of no mark. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. A characteristic or essential attribute; a differential. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. A number or other character used in registring; as, examination marks; a mark for tardiness. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. Image; likeness; hence, those formed in one's image; children; descendants. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. To put a mark upon; to affix a significant mark to; to make recognizable by a mark; as, to mark a box or bale of merchandise; to mark clothing. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. To leave a trace, scratch, scar, or other mark, upon, or any evidence of action; as, a pencil marks paper; his hobnails marked the floor. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. To keep account of; to enumerate and register; as, to mark the points in a game of billiards or cards. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. To notice or observe; to give attention to; to take note of; to remark; to heed; to regard. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. To take particular notice; to observe critically; to note; to remark. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. One of the bits of leather or colored bunting which are placed upon a sounding line at intervals of from two to five fathoms. The unmarked fathoms are called deeps. Webster Dictionary DB
  55. To be a mark upon; to designate; to indicate; - used literally and figuratively; as, this monument marks the spot where Wolfe died; his courage and energy marked him for a leader. Webster Dictionary DB
  56. A Trait; a sign by which anything is known; a symptom; an indication; impression, as a line, stain, scratch, written word, etc.; a proof; target; distinction; as, a man of mark; a German coin worth 24 1/2 cents. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  57. To make a line, scratch, character, etc., on; point out from others; to notice; to signle out, as by a sign; to indicate by a sign; to observe. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  58. To pay care ful attention; take note. marker. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  59. 1. Any spot, line, or other figure on the surface, visible through difference in color, elevation, or other peculiarity. 2. Infundibulum, the hollow in the incisor tooth of a horse, extending down about half an inch in the milk teeth and rather deeper in the permanent incisors; it appears as a black mark on the occlusal surface of the incisors; as the permanent incisors wear away by attrition, the mark tends gradually to disappear, and it is chiefly by a study of its condition that one is able to tell the age of a horse. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  60. A visible sign: any object serving as a guide: that by which anything is known: badge: a trace: proof: any visible effect: symptom: a thing aimed at: a character made by one who cannot write: distinction. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  61. To make a mark on anything: to impress with a sign: to take notice of: to regard. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  62. To take particular notice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  63. An obsolete English coin, value about $3.22: a coin of the present German Empire, value about 25c.: a silver coin of Hamburg, value about 32c. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  64. A visible sign; indication; thing aimed at; distinction. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  65. To make a mark upon; take notice of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  66. To make a mark or marks on; produce by marking; designate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. To heed; regard. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. To pay special attention. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. Marker. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  70. A visible trace or sign; a character; badge; characteristic. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  71. A target; aim. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  72. Distinction; eminence. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  73. A stroke drawn; an impression; any note of distinction; distinction; a visible effect; a visible sign; indication; an evidence; a thing aimed at; something serving as a guide; a character made by a person who cannot write his name; a weight; a coin, specially a German one, worth about is.; a trade mark; a license of reprisals. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  74. To make a mark on; to single out; to note or observe. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  75. To note; to observe critically. See Marque. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  76. Any visible impression, as a line, streak, or channel; any sign of distinction; a print; a stamp; evidence; sign; notice taken; an object; that at which a missile is directed; conspicuous character, as a man of mark; impression produced by ability or character, as "he has made his mark;" the X made by a person who cannot write his name. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  77. To draw or make an impression on or in; to impress with a token; to denote; to heed or regard; to observe. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  78. An ancient piece of money, equal to 13s. 4d. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  79. same as Marcus biblestudytools.com
  80. one of the evangelists, and probable author of the Gospel bearing his name. (Marcus was his Latin surname. His Jewish name was John, which is the same as Johanan (the grace of God ). We can almost trace the steps whereby the former became his prevalent name in the Church. "John, whose surname was Mark" in ( Acts 12:12 Acts 12:25 ; 15:37 ) becomes "John" alone in ( Acts 13:5 Acts 13:13 ) "Mark" in ( Acts 15:39 ) and thenceforward there is no change. ( Colossians 4:10 ); Phlm 1:24; 2Tim 4:11 The evangelist was the son of a certain Mary, a Jewish matron of some position who dwelt in Jerusalem, ( Acts 12:12 ) and was probably born of a Hellenistic family in that city. Of his father we know nothing; but we do know that the future evangelist was cousin of Barnabas of Cyprus, the great friend of St. Paul. His mother would seem to have been intimately acquainted with St. Peter, and it was to her house, as to a familiar home, that the apostle repaired, A.D. 44, after his deliverance from prison ( Acts 12:12 ) This fact accounts for St. Marks intimate acquaintance with that apostle, to whom also he probably owed his conversion, for St. Peter calls him his son. ( 1 Peter 5:13 ) We hear Of him for the first time in Acts 15:25 where we find him accompanying and Barnabas on their return from Jerusalem to Antioch, A.D. 45. He next comes before us on the occasion of the earliest missionary journey of the same apostles, A.D. 48, when he joined them as their "minister." ( Acts 13:8 ) With them he visited Cyprus; but at Perga in Pamphylia, ( Acts 13:13 ) when they were about to enter upon the more arduous part of their mission, he left them, and, for some unexplained reason, returned to Jerusalem to his mother and his home. Notwithstanding this, we find him at Pauls side during that apostles first imprisonment at Rome, A.D. 61-63, and he Is acknowledged by him as one of his few fellow laborers who had been a "comfort" to him during the weary hours of his imprisonment. ( Colossians 4:10 Colossians 4:11 ); Phle 1:24 We next have traces of him in ( 1 Peter 5:13 ) "The church that is in Babylon ... saluteth you, and so doth Marcus my son." From this we infer that he joined his spiritual father, the great friend of his mother, at Babylon, then and for same hundred years afterward one of the chief seats of Jewish culture. From Babylon he would seem to have returned to Asia Minor; for during his second imprisonment A.D. 68 St. Paul, writing to Timothy charges him to bring Mark with him to me, on the ground that he was "profitable to him For the ministry." ( 2 Timothy 4:11 ) From this point we gain no further information from the New Testament respecting the evangelist. It is most probable, however that he did join the apostle at Rome whither also St. Peter would seem to have proceeded, and suffered martyrdom with St. Paul. After the death of these two great pillars of the Church; ecclesiastical tradition affirms that St. Mark visited Egypt, founded the church of Alexandria, and died by martyrdom.--Condensed from Cambridge Bible for Schools.--ED.) biblestudytools.com
  81. To be a mark upon; to designate; to indicate; -- used literally and figuratively; as, this monument marks the spot where Wolfe died; his courage and energy marked him for a leader. mso.anu.edu.au
  82. the evangelist; "John whose surname was Mark" ( Acts 12:12 Acts 12:25 ). Mark (Marcus, Colossians 4:10 , etc.) was his Roman name, which gradually came to supersede his Jewish name John. He is called John in Acts 13:5 Acts 13:13 , and Mark in 15:39,2Tim 4:11 , etc. He was the son of Mary, a woman apparently of some means and influence, and was probably born in Jerusalem, where his mother resided ( Acts 12:12 ). Of his father we know nothing. He was cousin of Barnabas ( Colossians 4:10 ). It was in his mother's house that Peter found "many gathered together praying" when he was released from prison; and it is probable that it was here that he was converted by Peter, who calls him his "son" ( 1 Peter 5:13 ). It is probable that the "young man" spoken of in Mark 14:51,52was Mark himself. He is first mentioned in Acts 12:25 . He went with Paul and Barnabas on their first journey (about A.D. 47) as their "minister," but from some cause turned back when they reached Perga in Pamphylia ( Acts 12:25 ; 13:13 ). Three years afterwards a "sharp contention" arose between Paul and Barnabas ( 15:36-40 ), because Paul would not take Mark with him. He, however, was evidently at length reconciled to the apostle, for he was with him in his first imprisonment at Rome ( Colossians 4:10 ; Philemon 1:24 ). At a later period he was with Peter in Babylon ( 1 Peter 5:13 ), then, and for some centuries afterwards, one of the chief seats of Jewish learning; and he was with Timothy in Ephesus when Paul wrote him during his second imprisonment ( 2 Timothy 4:11 ). He then disappears from view. biblestudytools.com
  83. 1. A character, usually in the form of a cross, made as a substitute for his signature by a person who cannot write, in executing a conveyance or other legal docu- ment. It is commonly made as follows: A third person writes the name of the marks- man, leaving a blank space between the Christian name and surname; in this space the latter traces the mark, or crossed lines, and above the mark is writteu "his," (or "her,") and below it, "mark." 2. The sign, writing, or ticket put upon manufactured goods to distinguish them from others, appearing thus in the compound, "trade-mark." 3. A token, evidence, or proof; as In the phrase "a mark of fraud." 4. A weight used iu several parts of Europe, and for several commodities, especially gold and silver. When gold and silver are sold by the mark, it Is divided into twenty- four carats. 5. A money of accounts in England, and in some other countries a coin. The English mark is two-thirds of a pound sterling, or 13s. 4d.; and the Scotch mark is of equal value in Scotch money of account. Enc. Amer. 6. In early Teutonic and English law. A species of village community, being the lowest unit in the political system; one of the forms of the gens or clan, variously known as the "mark," "gemeinde," "com- iii line." or "parish." Also the land held in common by such a community. The union of several such village communities and their marks, or common lands, forms the next higher political union, the hundred. Freem. Coinpar. Politics, 110, 117. 7. The word is sometimes used as another form of "marque," a license of reprisals. thelawdictionary.org
  84. The unit of monetary account of the German Empire, equal to 23.8 cents of United States money (1913); the equivalent of one hundred pfennigs. Also, a silver coin of this value. The unit was retained by subsequent German states up to the time of the Federal Republic of Germany. In 1995, the value was approximately 65 cents American. In 1999 it began to be superseded by the Euro as a unit of currency in Germany and throughout much of the European union. dictgcide_fs
  85. Preeminence; high position; as, patricians of mark; a fellow of no mark. dictgcide_fs
  86. A number or other character used in registering; as, examination marks; a mark for tardiness. dictgcide_fs
  87. One of the bits of leather or colored bunting which are placed upon a sounding line at intervals of from two to five fathoms. The unmarked fathoms are called dictgcide_fs
  88. To be a mark upon; to designate; to indicate; used literally and figuratively; as, this monument marks the spot where Wolfe died; his courage and energy marked him for a leader. dictgcide_fs
  89. To notice or observe; to give attention to; to take note of; to remark; to heed; to regard; as, mark my words. dictgcide_fs
  90. märk, n. a visible sign: any object serving as a guide: that by which anything is known: a badge: a trace, impression, proof: any visible effect: symptom: a thing aimed at or striven for: an attainable point: a character made by one who cannot write: any impressed sign or stamp: a physical peculiarity: distinction: a boundary, limit: in medieval times, a tract of common land belonging to a community.--v.t. to make a mark on anything: to impress with a sign: to take notice of: to regard.--v.i. to take particular notice.--adj. MARKED, distinguished: prominent: notorious.--adv. MARK'EDLY, noticeably.--ns. MARK'ER, one who marks the score at games, as at billiards: a counter used at card-playing, &c.: the soldier who forms the pivot round which a body of soldiers wheels; MARK'ING, act of making a mark: a mark made upon anything; MARK'ING-INK, indelible ink, used for marking clothes; MARK'ING-NUT, the fruit of an East Indian tree of the cashew family, yielding a black juice used in marking cloths; MARK'MAN, one of the community owning a mark; MARKS'MAN, one good at hitting a mark: one who shoots well.--MARK DOWN, set down in writing, put a note of; MARK OUT, to lay out the plan or outlines of anything; MARK TIME, to move the feet alternately in the same manner as in marching, but without changing ground.--A MAN OF MARK, a well-known or famous man; BESIDE THE MARK, not properly referring to the matter in hand; GOD BLESS, or SAVE, THE MARK, or SAVE THE MARK, a phrase expressing ironical astonishment or scorn, from the usage of archery; MAKE ONE'S MARK, to leave a lasting impression: to gain great influence; TOE THE MARK, to stand to one's obligations, facing the consequences; TRADE MARK, a distinctive mark put on goods, &c., to show by whom they were made; UP TO THE MARK, good enough, measured by a certain standard. [A.S. mearc, a boundary; Ger. mark, Goth. marka.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  91. märk, n. an obsolete English coin=13s. 4d.: a coin of the present German Empire=about one shilling: a silver coin of Hamburg=about 1s. 4d. [A.S. marc, another form of the above word.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  92. Target or other object to be aimed at; beside, wide of, the m., not hitting it, (fig.) not to the point; (Boxing) pit of stomach; desired object, as hit, miss, the m.; sign, indication, (of quality, character, &c.), esp. m. of mouth, depression in horse\'s tooth indicating age; affixed or impressed sign, seal, &c.; EAR, HALL, TRADE, -m.; cross &c. made in place of signature by illiterate person; written symbol; this as sign of good or bad conduct; unit of numerical award of merit in examination, as he gained 46 mm.; line &c. serving to indicate position; Plimsoll\'s m., line showing how far ship may legally besubmerged when loaded; below, up to, &c., the m. (standard); (Footb.) heelm. on ground made by player who has obtained fair catch; stain, scar, &c.; make one\'s m., attain distinction; (as apology for mentioning anything horrible &c.) (God) save the m.; of m., noteworthy; (Hist.) tract of land held by Teutonic village community. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  93. Make a mark on (thing) by stamping, cutting, writing, &c.; put identifying mark or name on (linen); attach figures indicating prices to (goods); (pass.) have natural marks, as marked with silver spots; m. out, trace out boundaries for (ground), plan (course), destine, as marked out for slaughter; m. off, separate (thing from another, lit. & fig.) by boundary; indicate (place on map, length of syllable) by signs or marks; record (points gained in games); manifest (one\'s displeasure &c. by); (pass.) this tendency is strongly marked (noticeable), a marked difference, whence markedly adv., markedness n.; accompany, be a feature of, as no triumph marks her manner; m. time, move feet as in marching, but without advancing (often fig.); see, notice; observe mentally, as m. my words; a marked man, one whose conduct is watched with suspicion or hostility; (also m. down) note& remember spot to which (grouse &c.) has retired; (Footb.) keep close to (opponent) so as to hamper him if he receives ball. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  94. Denomination of weight for gold& silver, usu. 8 oz. (now only of continental weights); German coin worth slightly less than shilling. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  95. A localized peculiarity, presenting a visible difference of color, bruise, nevus, etc. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  96. A silver coin weighing eleven pennyweights six grains, offered by Morris to the Continental Congress in 1783 for consideration as a national coin, but not accepted. It was equivalent to ten of his "cents," seventy of ours. Obverse: An eye, the centre of a glory, thirteen-points cross, equidistant a circle of as many stars. Legend: Nova Constellatio. Reverse: U.S. 1.000, a wreath surrounding. Legend: Libertas. Justitia. 1783. This, with the quint, were known as the Nova Constellatio patterns. Dictionary of United States history
  97. [A.S.] A sum of 13s. 4d. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  98. A weight, which in Prussia is 3609 grains troy; it is half a Cologne or Prussian pound, and a little more than an English half-pound avoirdupois. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  99. In the new German coinage, which is legal throughout the empire, a mark is a third of a thaler; the twenty-mark gold coin is worth about 19s. 7d. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  100. The territory of a primitive Teutonic community, ruled by a king, ealdorman, or some other elective or hereditary leader. Such are Denmark, Finmark, etc. See Marches. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  101. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A visible sign, as a line, point, trace, or the like, made by drawing; figure;— a groove or depression made by stamping or cutting; impression; stamp; incision;— visible effect; proof; evidence;— a note or sign of distinction; token; conspicuous character; rank; state;— any object used as a guide or directory; landmark;— object to which one seeks to reach; goal; standard of attain mental;— specifically, a character made, instead of signature, by one who cannot write;— a merchant's stamp or board. [Anglo-Saxon] A silver coin, valued at thirteen shillings and four pence. Cabinet Dictionary

What are the misspellings for mark?

X