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Definitions of catch

  1. the act of apprehending (especially apprehending a criminal); "the policeman on the beat got credit for the collar" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. attract and fix; "His look caught her"; "She caught his eye"; "Catch the attention of the waiter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. attract; cause to be enamored; "She captured all the men's hearts" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. capture as if by hunting, snaring, or trapping; "I caught a rabbit in the trap toady" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. start burning; "The fire caught" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a cooperative game in which a ball is passed back and forth; "he played catch with his son in the backyard" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a fastener that fastens or locks a door or window Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a restraint that checks the motion of something; "he used a book as a stop to hold the door open" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a hidden drawback; "it sounds good but what's the catch?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. a break or check in the voice (usually a sign of strong emotion) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. anything that is caught (especially if it is worth catching); "he shared his catch with the others" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. a person regarded as a good matrimonial prospect Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. contract; "did you catch a cold?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. be struck or affected by; "catch fire"; "catch the mood" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. catch up with and possibly overtake; "The Rolls Royce caught us near the exit ramp" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. take hold of so as to seize or restrain or stop the motion of; "Catch the ball!"; "Grab the elevator door!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. the quantity that was caught; "the catch was only 10 fish" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. to hook or entangle; "One foot caught in the stirrup" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. hear, usually without the knowledge of the speakers; "We overheard the conversation at the next table" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. see or watch; "view a show on television"; "This program will be seen all over the world"; "view an exhibition"; "Catch a show on Broadway"; "see a movie" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. detect a blunder or misstep; "The reporter tripped up the senator" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. the act of catching an object with the hands; "Mays made the catch with his back to the plate"; "he made a grab for the ball before it landed"; "Martin's snatch at the bridle failed and the horse raced away". Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. delay or hold up; prevent from proceeding on schedule or as planned; "I was caught in traffic and missed the meeting" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. grasp with the mind or develop an undersatnding of; "did you catch that allusion?"; "We caught something of his theory in the lecture"; "don't catch your meaning"; "did you get it?"; "She didn't get the joke"; "I just don't get him" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. discover or come upon accidentally, suddenly, or unexpectedly; catch somebody doing something or in a certain state; "She caught her son eating candy"; "She was caught shoplifting" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. become aware of; "he caught her staring out the window" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. be the catcher; "Who is catching?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. succeed in catching or seizing, especially after a chase; "We finally got the suspect"; "Did you catch the thief?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. cause to become accidentally or suddenly caught, ensnared, or entangled; "I caught the hem of my dress in the brambles" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  30. spread or be communicated; "The fashion did not catch" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. reach with a blow or hit in a particular spot; "the rock caught her in the back of the head"; "The blow got him in the back"; "The punch caught him in the stomach" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. take in and retain; "We have a big barrel to catch the rainwater" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  33. apprehend and reproduce accurately; "She really caught the spirit of the place in her drawings"; "She got the mood just right in her photographs" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  34. reach in time; "I have to catch a train at 7 o'clock" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  35. suffer from the receipt of; "She will catch hell for this behavior!" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. perceive with the senses quickly, suddenly, or momentarily; "I caught the aroma of coffee"; "He caught the allusion in her glance"; "ears open to catch every sound"; "The dog picked up the scent"; "Catch a glimpse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. perceive by hearing; "I didn't catch your name"; "She didn't get his name when they met the first time" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. get or regain something necessary, usually quickly or briefly; "Catch some sleep"; "catch one's breath" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. check oneself during an action; "She managed to catch herself before telling her boss what was on her mind" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  40. To lay hold on; to seize, especially with the hand; to grasp (anything) in motion, with the effect of holding; as, to catch a ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To seize after pursuing; to arrest; as, to catch a thief. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To take captive, as in a snare or net, or on a hook; as, to catch a bird or fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. Hence: To insnare; to entangle. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. To seize with the senses or the mind; to apprehend; as, to catch a melody. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. To communicate to; to fasten upon; as, the fire caught the adjoining building. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. To engage and attach; to please; to charm. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. To get possession of; to attain. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. To take or receive; esp. to take by sympathy, contagion, infection, or exposure; as, to catch the spirit of an occasion; to catch the measles or smallpox; to catch cold; the house caught fire. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. To come upon unexpectedly or by surprise; to find; as, to catch one in the act of stealing. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. To reach in time; to come up with; as, to catch a train. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. To attain possession. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. To be held or impeded by entanglement or a light obstruction; as, a kite catches in a tree; a door catches so as not to open. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. To take hold; as, the bolt does not catch. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. To spread by, or as by, infecting; to communicate. Webster Dictionary DB
  55. Act of seizing; a grasp. Webster Dictionary DB
  56. That by which anything is caught or temporarily fastened; as, the catch of a gate. Webster Dictionary DB
  57. The posture of seizing; a state of preparation to lay hold of, or of watching he opportunity to seize; as, to lie on the catch. Webster Dictionary DB
  58. That which is caught or taken; profit; gain; especially, the whole quantity caught or taken at one time; as, a good catch of fish. Webster Dictionary DB
  59. Something desirable to be caught, esp. a husband or wife in matrimony. Webster Dictionary DB
  60. Passing opportunities seized; snatches. Webster Dictionary DB
  61. A slight remembrance; a trace. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. A humorous canon or round, so contrived that the singers catch up each other's words. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. To seize or grasp; lay hold of suddenly; take captive; to please or charm; to take, by contagion, infection, or sympathy, as a disease; attack; detect; to comprehend; as, to catch the idea; come up to; reach in time, as a train. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  64. The act of seizing or grasping; that which is taken; as, a good catch of fish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  65. Catcher. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. Caught. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  67. Catching. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  68. To take hold of: to seize after pursuit: to trap or insnare: to take a disease by infection. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  69. To be contagious:-pa.t. and pa.p. caught (kawt). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  70. Seizure: anything that seizes or holds: that which is caught: a sudden advantage taken: a song the parts of which are caught up by different voices. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  71. A trick. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  72. Seizure; that which takes hold; that which is taken; a song for several voices. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  73. To seize; trap; take. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  74. To take; seize; capture; ensnare; surprize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  75. To grasp; apprehend; engage; captivate. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  76. To seize or attempt to seize something; with at. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  77. Baseball. To act as catcher. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  78. To become entangled or fastened. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  79. To be contagious. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  80. The act of catching. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  81. That which catches; a fastening. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  82. Something caught or gained. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  83. An impediment; a break. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  84. A round; a scrap of song. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  85. The act of seizing; seizure; anything that seizes, takes hold, or checks; a watching an opportunity to seize; advantage; a snatch, or a short interval of action; a song, the parts of which are caught up in succession by different singers; a play upon words. To catch at, to endeavour to seize suddenly. To catch it, to receive a scolding. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  86. To seize; to intercept from falling; to seize in pursuit; to ensnare; to captivate; to get entangled with; to get possession of; to receive; to receive by sympathy, contagion, or infection; to engage and attach to; to come upon suddenly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  87. To get entangled; to communicate; to be contagious; to take hold. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  88. To seize suddenly; to lay hold on with the hands; to take or receive by exposure, as a cold, or a disease by infection; to ensnare; to overtake. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  89. Anything that seizes or holds; the act of seizing; a sudden advantage taken; a song in parts, in which those singing catch up the strain one after the other at various intervals. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  90. kach, v.t. to take hold of: to apprehend or understand: to seize after pursuit: to trap or ensnare: to take a disease by infection: to take up anything by sympathy or imitation.--v.i. to be contagious: to be entangled or fastened in anything;--pa.t. and pa.p. caught (kawt).--n. seizure: anything that seizes or holds: that which is caught: anything worth catching: a sudden advantage taken: a specially English form of musical composition, written generally in three or four parts, and in the canon form--originally synonymous with the round.--adj. CATCH'ABLE, that may be caught.--ns. CATCH'ER, one who catches; CATCH'FLY, a popular name of several plants belonging to the genus Silene, and of Lychnis Viscaria, whose glutinous stems often retain insects settling on them; CATCH'ING, the action of the verb 'to catch:' a nervous or spasmodic twitching.--adj. infectious: captivating, attractive.--ns. CATCH'MENT-B[=A]S'IN, a term applied to all that part of a river-basin from which rain is collected, and from which, therefore, the river is fed; CATCH'PENNY, any worthless thing, esp. a publication, intended merely to gain money--also adj.; CATCH'WORD, among actors, the last word of the preceding speaker--the cue: the word at the head of the page in a dictionary or encyclopædia: the first word of a page given at the bottom of the preceding page: any word or phrase taken up and repeated as the watchword or symbol of a party.--adj. CATCH'Y, attractive, deceptive, readily caught up, as an air, &c., fitful.--CATCH AT, to snatch at; CATCH FIRE, to become ignited, to be inspired by passion or zeal; CATCH HOLD OF, to seize; CATCH IT, to get a scolding or the like; CATCH ME! an emphatic colloquial phrase implying that there is not the remotest possibility of my doing something suggested; CATCH ON, to comprehend: to catch the popular fancy; CATCH OUT, to put a batsman out at cricket by catching the ball he has batted; CATCH SIGHT OF, suddenly to get a glimpse of; CATCH UP, to overtake; CATCH UP, or AWAY, to lay hold of forcibly. [From O. Fr. cachier--Late L. capti[=a]re for capt[=a]re, inten. of cap[)e]re, to take. See CHASE.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  91. (caught Provencal kawt). Capture, ensnare (c. CRAB), overtake (also c. up; caught in storm), lay hold of (also c. hold of; c. a TARTAR; c. up habit &c., adopt), be in time for (train &c.); surprise, detect, (at or in, or doing; c. me!, him!, you may be sure we shall not); hit (usu. with part specified; caught him on the nose; also caught him a blow or one); (of fire or combustible) ignite, be ignited, (c. fire or c.); be entangled, take hold, (usu. c. in a thing; bolt catches; c. on, become popular); snatch (esp. c. up, away; c. at, often fig. =be glad to get); intercept motion of (nail catches dress; at cricket, c. ball, prevent its touching ground off bat, also c. or c. out batsman, dismiss by doing this); check suddenly (c. one\'s breath; c. up speaker, interrupt); receive, incur, be infected with, (cold, a cold, a fever; a scolding, thrashing, or it; enthusiasm, a habit, an accent; c. one\'s DEATH; pond &c. catches, is coated with ice); grasp with senses or mind (meaning, sound, tune; c. a likeness, see& reproduce it; c. glimpse of, see for a moment; don\'t c. on, fail to see meaning); arrest, captivate, (attention, eye, fancy; c. Speaker\'s eye, succeed in being called on to speak in H. of Commons); c.-drain, along hillside to prevent water\'s running off; c.-\'em-alive-o, sticky fly-paper; c.-fly, a sticky-stemmed plant; catch-penny (adj.), claptrap, intended merely to sell; catchweed, Goosegrass; catchword, word so placed as to draw attention, e. g. first of dictionary article, rhyming word in verse, last word (cue) of actor\'s speech, also influential temporary phrase in politics, religion, &c. Hence catchable a., (-)catcher n. [old Northern French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  92. Act of catching; amount of fish caught; chance of, success in, catching at cricket (also a good, safe, c., one skilful at it); cunning question, deception, surprise; contrivance for checking motion of door &c.; thing or person caught or worth catching (no c., bad bargain, unwelcome acquisition); (Mus.) composition for several voices, second &c. beginning same melody when first &c. is a line further on, usu. with arrangement for ludicrous verbal combinations. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  93. c. out, (fig.) c. in a mistake &c., c. napping; c.-out n., act of catching out, circumstance &c. that upsets calculations &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  94. n. Act of seizing; seizure;—that which is taken; sudden advantage; gain;—a play upon words;—a humorous round, in which the singers alternate the words;—the last word in a page reprinted at the top of the succeeding page;—the closing word of an actor's speech serving as a cue to the speaker following. Cabinet Dictionary
  95. Seizure, the act of seizing; the act of taking quickly; a song sung in succession; watch, the posture of seizing; an advantage taken hold laid on; the thing caught, profit; a short interval of action; a taint, a slight contagion; any thing that catches, as a hook; a small failing ship. Complete Dictionary

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